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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 8:40 am 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 5:24 pm 
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County Line

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2019 11:08 am 
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California 1930's

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2019 3:14 pm 
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from surfline.com

We’ve been doing this whole Good-Epic series showcasing perfect lineup photos since about 2011. Mostly, as you’d expect, it’s places like Cloudbreak or the Mentawais or Maldives or some other dreamy tropical spot. ‘Cause lets face it: they tend more towards Good-Epic than say, the average beachbreak down the street.

Well, in Wednesday afternoon’s case, the average beachbreak directly across the street from Surfline HQ decided to show up and throw its hat into the ring with a few-hour window of absolutely flawless, punchy, offshore a-frames. It got very difficult to focus in meetings when it looked like the Outer Banks or Ocean Beach or Hossegor out front. And PS: This never happens. Especially in the afternoon, and especially on an afternoon in May, which normally sees whitecaps to the horizon with the typical spring northwest winds. We grabbed forecaster Schaler Perry after he got out of the water with salt-crusted eyebrows and an unshakeable, wide-eyed grin.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2019 2:03 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 9:58 am 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Jul 06, 2019 9:41 am 
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The pressure is releasing....

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2019 11:25 am 
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Pismo Beach Pier in rare form.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2019 2:10 pm 
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Surf's on the way.

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Juliette

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2019 5:06 am 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2019 9:34 am 
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8) :mrgreen:

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2019 10:47 am 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:06 am 
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HOLLISTER RANCH WILL OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, BUT IS THAT A GOOD THING?
NEWLY-PASSED BILL ENDS THE ERA OF EXCLUSIVITY FOR SOCAL'S MOST PRISTINE COASTLINE
OCTOBER 11, 2019 BY JUSTIN HOUSMAN


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Other than a party, a sporting event, maybe a concert, few things are improved by the addition of a whole lot more people. Take, oh, I don’t know, California, for example. Geographically, topographically, meteorologically, bathymetrically, it’s about as good and beautiful as a hunk of land gets on this planet. It’s kind of magical, really. Be a lot more so, though, with about half the amount of people living here. As the population has skyrocketed in recent decades with development and infrastructure following apace, bit by bit, the magic has faded.

Same goes with idyllic surf spots. What a freaking joy it must have been to surf Rincon when there were, at most, a couple hundred surfers in the entire state. You would actually get to experience the surf and the natural environment it inhabits for what it is. Now, you mostly experience it relative to a crowd. It’s impossible to filter out the effect of human activity; that aspect is now as much a natural part of Rincon as the cobblestone point.

Every so often when my mind drifts it gets hung up on a lingering fantasy: What if I was given the keys to a time machine? Where would I go? See the dinosaurs? Cool, but, nah. Take in a joust in medieval France? Tempting, but nope. Visit our potentially space-touring future? Yawn. My fantasy is California before the hordes fucked it up. Northern California salmon running in huge numbers in small streams, brown bears patrolling coastal forests, functioning river systems emptying into the sea. And in Southern California, beautiful, mostly untouched beaches.

That last part has always been the charm of privately-held Hollister Ranch. Sure, the waves there can be incredible and much less crowded than Santa Barbara to the south on the same swell, but the pristine coastal bluffs and ocean at the Ranch are as close as we’ll ever get to the experience of hopping out of a time machine and into a pre-modern California. That’s the real magic of the place.

Whether that magic can be sustained is now in question with the passage into law of California Assembly Bill 1680 this week. The bill guarantees public access to Hollister Ranch. For nearly four decades various lawsuits have sought to provide public entry into the Ranch, but they’ve been summarily swatted away by the Hollister Ranch Owners Association. But in recent years a lawsuit built around an old YMCA easement into the Ranch gained enough steam to attract the attention of the California Coastal Commission and then the state legislature and finally Governor Newsom himself.

Just like that, with the swipe of a pen, the guardhouse at the entrance to the Ranch has been razed.

Well, sorta. The bill sets a deadline for a public access plan to be in place by April 2022. It allows the state to exercise eminent domain to seize land in order to create that public access. It makes it a crime to delay or otherwise obstruct public access, which raises the question of whether it will even be legally possible to bring a lawsuit to combat the bill. It’s a fairly aggressive use of state power to assure the public can get to the beaches of the Ranch.

Those have always been public, of course, up to the mean high tide line, you just had to get there without going over the land fronting the beach. Meaning you could always surf the Ranch. You just had to put in the effort. That effort might mean boating or hiking in or scraping together a couple hundred thou with some buddies to buy your way in, but the effort kept the crowds down. Made it special.

I guess at this point I should say that I occasionally get to surf the Ranch. I do not own property at the Ranch. But I have an extended family member who does. I cannot go whenever I want. I cannot go without my family member there. I cannot go anywhere on the beach without my family member present. I am certainly not rich. The Ranch is not my private surf playground, and ha ha, you can’t come in. But I have surfed there many times and I have seen that it’s unlike anywhere else in California. I say that not to boast, but to suggest that it’s easy to read about the Ranch and shake your fist at wealthy assholes keeping you out if you’ve never been there. But, like most things in life, this is a nuanced issue. Am I biased? Sure. If you’ve surfed there, you probably are too. If I didn’t have that access, I wouldn’t have seen what might be lost.

The bill has put me, a bleeding heart progressive liberal, normally on the front lines of protecting public lands against the clutches of private interests, in the awkward position of arguing against public lands, at least in this one unique case, and depending on what “public access” ends up meaning. Hollister Ranch is the last major slice of undeveloped coastal land south of Point Conception. If that changes, it’s gone forever. I don’t anticipate major development there in the wake of this bill, but I do anticipate a whole lot more traffic and people and all of the impact that may bring. I wonder if there will be compensation for property owners who will surely see their land values plummet in the wake of the bill. I wonder how the state will decide what access means. I wonder if this will result in something as relatively harmless as a state-funded access road and a few bluff-side parking areas and restrooms. Or if houses and infrastructure will pop up in a place that’s beautiful and special precisely because it has none of that. I wonder how crowded Rights and Lefts will get.

I find it difficult to believe that anyone who would enjoy a place like the Ranch, in all its natural beauty, would really think that allowing countless more people access to the place is a good thing. For surfers, that’d be even more dubious. Do we really want Big Drakes to become another Rincon? Another Pleasure Point? A hundred surfers in the water on any hint of swell?

The bane of every single surfer’s existence is a crowded lineup. It’s the one thing we all can agree on—crowds suck. They threaten to ruin the fun of surfing. We all dream of uncrowded waves. We pay thousands of dollars to fly across the world to surf without hordes of people. So, here’s an idea: let’s maybe keep at least one part of this state (south of the mostly poor-wave-filled-and-empty northern coastline) crowd-free. Why would we, as surfers, want to import the thing we hate most about surfing—crowds—right into one of the most pristine surf zones in the US? Because everyone should get to enjoy that pristine beach, you say? Sure, that’d be nice. But if everybody does, then it’s no longer pristine, and you’re no better off than when you started—the coast, however, is much worse off.

Growing up in San Luis Obispo County, long before I had my Ranch connection, the place was whispered about. A surfing Shangri-La that held a mystique and a romance. It wasn’t exactly untouchable but it invited a kind of quest. “Let’s get a zodiac and boat in,” we’d say, teenagers drunk on beer and ambition and naivete. “Let’s sneak in at night,” we’d say, poring over topo maps and tide books. “Joe hiked in once, he knows secret paths,” we’d overhear while bobbing in the lineup during south swell lulls. If the Ranch had been open then, there’d be no such magic.

If in a decade the Ranch resembles the coast off Highway One between Santa Cruz and Pacifica—mostly private ag land with occasional state beaches every few miles—that’s a best-case scenario. If the Hollister Ranch Owners Association can maintain its rigorous standards of protection against development, and the beach is run as a state beach with no buildings other than restrooms, then, it’s probably not going to physically change the character of the Ranch much.

But it will lose its magic. That sense that there is still a place where you can surf California in the days before it was the California we know, a living time capsule. Whether you have a key to its pearly gates or not, there’s a kind of comfort knowing that it exists. But now, it seems, its days are numbered.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2019 10:38 am 
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Steve Greenberg
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Steve Greenberg is an editorial cartoonist and artist in Southern California, drawing for the Ventura County Reporter and LAObserved.


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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:46 pm 
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The Wedge 2019 - https://youtu.be/vsRsDBoQYew & https://youtu.be/XP5TBzQkBvQ

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:36 pm 
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South Bay LA Dec 2nd

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 11:31 am 
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Thousands of 'Penis Fish' Washed Up on a California Beach: 'It Went on for Two Miles'

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“I walked for another half hour and they were scattered everywhere. There were seagulls lined up the beach the whole way having eaten so much they could barely stand."

David Ford likes to walk Drakes Beach whenever he can. On December 6, after a storm, he walked along the Bay Area beach and noticed hundreds of seagulls feasting on something in the sand. The sight of what they were eating shocked him.

The creatures were pink and roughly six inches long with a little nipple-like protrusion at the tip. Frankly, It looked as if hundreds of thousands of dicks had washed ashore. “I didn’t expect to see such bizarre creatures on the ground,” Ford told Motherboard over the phone.

“I had no idea what they might be...it went on for two miles,” Ford said. “I walked for another half hour and they were scattered everywhere. There were seagulls lined up the beach the whole way having eaten so much they could barely stand. A quarter of them looked like they were still alive. The rest were dead, they had a dead sea-creature smell.”

Ford took pictures of the creatures and searched the internet to solve the mystery of the beached cock swarm. He discovered they were a species of worm called fat innkeeper worms, or "penis fish." Ford reached out to Bay Nature, which runs a column called “Ask a Naturalist” that explained the worms' strange shape and guessed at why they may have have washed up on the beach en masse. According to biologist Ivan Parr, writing for Bay Nature:

“Yes, the physical design of the fat innkeeper worm has some explaining to do. But the fat innkeeper is perfectly shaped for a life spent underground. Within a beach or mudflat, it digs a U-shaped burrow extending a few feet in length but no wider than the worm itself. The burrow’s front entrance pokes up like a little sand chimney. These can be seen clustered around the low tide line of a mudflat or sandy beach. The backdoor is marked by a pile of worm castings, which get projected out the end of the tunnel with a blast of water from the worm’s hindquarters.”

Par wrote that he didn’t know why the penis fish ended up on Drakes Beach, but guessed that it had something to do with the recent storm and the fish’s penchant for sandy habitats. This isn’t the first time this has happened, either.

“We’re seeing the risk of building your home out of sand,” Parr wrote. “Strong storms—especially during El Niño years—are perfectly capable of laying siege to the intertidal zone, breaking apart the sediments, and leaving their contents stranded on shore.”

“When the tide is in, the worm slides up to the chimney of its burrow and exudes a sticky mucous net from a ring of glands,” Parr wrote. “Sometimes you can see these mucous nets, looking like decaying jellyfish, draped around the burrow entrance. The worm continues to secrete as it slips lower into the burrow, generating a slime-net that stretches from the chimney to the worm’s mouth.”

Seeing such strange sights is one of the reasons Ford loves to walk the beach. “Those creatures are in a phylum all by themselves with three other things and have been on their own path of evolution for 400 or 500 million years,” he said. “It’s a wonder of their fertility. There must have been hundreds of thousands of them.”

The innkeeper worms weren’t the only odd site on the beach that day. “There were a couple of elephant seals, which are rather phallic themselves,” he said. “There was a carcass of a sea turtle, which don’t live around here, and the carcass of an angel shark. The ocean is full of mysteries.”

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 3:11 pm 
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^^The unspoken sign of the apocalypse^^
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 3:57 pm 
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^ I thought the sign would be vagina crabs or something.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:44 pm 
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West Cliff, Santa Cruz:
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 10:41 am 
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Meanwhile, in Palo Alto:
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2020 3:50 pm 
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Good-Epic: Northern California Beachbreak, January 3rd
Solid northwest swell tapers off, local wind conditions shape up, a few hours of perfection ensue


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The giant purple blob that ate up much of the Pacific Ocean after Christmas, was, as Surfline forecaster Jonathan Warren described, “a storm system that portrayed a classic midwinter scenario – a large/strong low that slowly tracked from Japan toward the Gulf of Alaska and with good high pressure support ridging in behind it.” The Eddie went on Yellow Alert, but was called off. Meanwhile, Pipeline pumped for days. Mavericks was, well, a bit ragged on January 1st and 2nd. Yesterday, though, as the swell dropped to manageable levels and the wind swung around from the east, Ocean Beach offered up large to extra-large a-frames for locals and visitors alike — making it our first Good-Epic of the decade. (See all 2019’s Good-Epic here.)

We asked Surfline lead forecaster Schaler Perry about it. “When it comes to XL or large California surf, storm systems strongest west of the dateline are typically a write-off,” he said. “There’s just too much decay as the swell makes its way ‘cross the Pacific. But there’s really no cliché more applicable to surf forecasting than the notion that general rules of thumb are meant to be broken. Leading into Christmas, long-range forecast charts were telegraphing a low to behold – with seas near 60 feet – developing over the far northwestern Pacific just before the New Year. Special sauce for the West Coast would be the track – slow to the east-northeast with a captured fetch developing as the strongest winds remained over the developing seas. Enhanced swell production.”

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Perry continues: “As our low began to deepen on a slow track away from Japan the stats were impressive – an expansive area of 45-65 knot winds and seas just shy of 60 feet. A little short of model guidance, but we knew Hawaii was going to be XXL and the West Coast would see a uniquely sizeable, especially long period swell to start the New Year. The end result for Northern California was a near-three-day run with about ten feet of deepwater swell – period in the 20-22 second range January 1st, at 18-20 seconds on the 2nd, then easing to 15-17 seconds as Ocean Beach went Good to Epic on the 3rd.”

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2020 10:57 pm 
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The swell was so big that the waves cracked some of the pilings on the Capitola Wharf. And there's a viral video of some idiot getting washed off the rocks at Bonny Doon Beach. Park Rangers had to risk their own lives to save his sorry ass...

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2020 12:37 pm 
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Morro Bay Rock Going Off!!!... :shock:

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:40 am 
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