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PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 6:12 pm 
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http://www.drumchannel.com/entertainment/3016.aspx

a discussion with some of Frank's drummers.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 10:10 pm 
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Yeah, it's pretty neat. Terry Bozzio, Chad Wackerman, Ruth Underwood, Chester Thompson and Ralph Armstrong.

Ya' can't beat that with a stick..... well, actually you can. :P

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 9:54 am 
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aynsley dunbar is where its at

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 10:44 am 
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MentalTossFlycoon wrote:
Ralph Armstrong.



Ralph Humphrey (Ralph Armstrong is the Mahavishnu bassist who guested with FZ once or twice)


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:57 am 
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Does anyone know what Indiana concert Chad is referring to (around 4:30 into the vid), on the 4th part, about playing almost the full concert in reggae arrangements?! I bet jaypfunk knows...

BTW, there is another thread about this somewhere around...

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:09 am 
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will travel: Drummer Terry Bozzio brings his supersize kit to the Iron will travel: Drummer Terry Bozzio brings his supersize kit to the Iron Horse

https://www.gazettenet.com/Have-drums-will-travel-Legendary-drummer-Terry-Bozzio-comes-to-the-Iron-Horse-19782546

By CHRIS GOUDREAU
Staff writer
Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Terry Bozzio is a drumming legend known for his work with rock and roll iconoclast Frank Zappa, British rock guitarist Jeff Beck, Mick Jagger and scores of other famous rock and jazz musicians. Among a number of accomplishments, he’s been listed by Rolling Stone as one of the top five drummers of all time, and he won a Grammy award for best rock instrumental on Jeff Beck’s 1990 album, “Jeff Beck’s Guitar Shop.”

The California-born Bozzio got his start on drums at a young age in the 1950s and, after seeing The Beatles perform on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964, begged his father for formal lessons. He’s been touring constantly since the 1970s and next Thursday, September 6, he brings his unique solo show to Northampton’s Iron Horse Music Hall at 7 p.m.

The Gazette spoke with the celebrated drummer by phone ahead of his performance, which will feature Bozzio performing compositions that draw from jazz, classical, and ethnic percussion styles across the world on his massive custom drum kit (26 toms, two snares, eight bass drums, 53 cymbals, 22 pedals, including xylophone, glockenspiel, gongs, and two electronic drums).

And Bozzi’s show is much more than just a “bombastic two hour drum solo,” according to the Iron Horse. The veteran drummer combines classical forms and structures, ambient electronic loops, atmospheric percussion effects, looped bass sounds, and a number of other sounds.

Daily Hampshire Gazette: Could you tell me how you developed your current musical project building these musical compositions on percussion?

Terry Bozzio: I try to improvise in a compositional way. It’s not just throwaway soloing or licks. It’s thematic and developmental. Over the years, that’s just become what I do … It’s not a typical, Ginger-Baker-type long rock solo. At least 10 or so compositions have a wide variety of feels and textures and moods.

DHG: What was it like working with Frank Zappa, specifically on “Baby Snakes”? (Zappa’s legendary 1977 Halloween concert at New York City’s Palladium Theater, which was later released as a concert film including footage of backstage antics)


TB: Everything was. It was more at the beginning. You kind of get used to the work and the level of intensity. Being with Frank was a very intense situation … Every day there was a sound check and a rehearsal, and we would do new arrangements.

We were kind of like Army training or boot camp. You just really dug in, and music was your life. That was a fantastic experience. Plus the guy was such a genius, was so funny, and great to be around. I consider myself very lucky to have had that opportunity to play with him.

DHG: You’ve performed with a ton of famous musicians throughout the years. Who are some of your favorites, and what did you like about performing with them?

TB: One of my favorite bass players and dearest friends is Patrick O’Hearn, and we’ve done a lot of things together. We used to play jazz together with Eddie Henderson, Joe Henderson, and Woody Shaw, and Julian Priester — all the great jazz musicians that came to San Francisco in the early 1970s.

And then, I would say in terms of projects one of the favorite things I’ve ever done was [instrumental improvisational group HoBoLeMa] with Allan Holdsworth, Tony Levin, and Pat Mastelotto … Jeff Beck was another great instrumentalist and just unmatched in his sound and tone and his expression. I loved playing with Jeff.

DHG: What initially led to you becoming a drummer, and who were some of your biggest influences during your formative years?

TB: I would imagine seeing Little Ricky on the “I Love Lucy Show” and Cubby O’Brien on “The Mickey Mouse Club” in the 1950s on black and white TV. Those were the first two children that I saw play drums. I probably assumed it was an adult activity until then. That was a moment I can remember.

And my dad had a Tito Puente album and we had a kind of end table that was a set of three nesting tables. They were solid wood and they had three different tones, so I would call the nesting tables my bongos and I would play along with Tito Puente.

DHG: Is touring different now compared to when you were younger?

TB: Absolutely. You have these levels that you work on. The jazz level is you throw the drums in the back of your car and you go to play in San Francisco or something, and then you’re thrown in the Zappa level … I’d never even seen these big lighting rigs. So, that level was private bus, private planes sometimes, or flying commercially. It’s something you adapt to, but everything’s provided for you at that level. The same with Jeff Beck; a very high level of touring.

And then there’s projects you do out of love. You maybe rent a van and pile in with the three guys you’re playing with and make it work. I come to find in my solo situation, having done drum clinics, that maybe the company would send a pick-up kit for me to use. [But then] – I can’t adjust things the way I like.

So, I thought, ‘Okay, I need to have my own drum set everywhere.’ We have an SUV and a trailer and that’s the best way to go. It takes longer and it’s more expensive because you’re driving a lot between big states. You eat up at least $500 a day just traveling, and every off day is losing money, but that’s the way to do it. I have my wife with me and our trusted tech and the drums are in the trailer in the back.

DHG: Are there any projects in the works that you’re really excited about now?

TB: “Reality” is a project I recorded in 1991. I just went into the studio with a beatbox and my drums and just made up sections and breakdowns and solo sections based on very melodic beatbox patterns; not like hip-hop, but more African sounds. I basically had this empty bunch of drum tracks, and since 1991 I’d been working on that. I finally finished it over five or six technological overturns.

That’s a really beautiful project. The first two tunes are my favorite. They have flute that I play through a vocoder [an instrument that replicates the human voice], which has a kind of a Weather Report-ish feel to them. It’s almost like a hybrid musical experience with classical and film and ambients and electronics mixed together.

Image


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:15 am 
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^^^I'm considering going to see this October 7th in Sacramento. Better get my ticket soon.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:24 am 
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KUIII wrote:
^^^I'm considering going to see this October 7th in Sacramento. Better get my ticket soon.

Should be well worth it! We expect a full report if you go!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:45 am 
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cory1984 wrote:
will travel: Drummer Terry Bozzio brings his supersize kit to the Iron will travel: Drummer Terry Bozzio brings his supersize kit to the Iron Horse

https://www.gazettenet.com/Have-drums-will-travel-Legendary-drummer-Terry-Bozzio-comes-to-the-Iron-Horse-19782546

By CHRIS GOUDREAU
Staff writer
Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Terry Bozzio is a drumming legend known for his work with rock and roll iconoclast Frank Zappa, British rock guitarist Jeff Beck, Mick Jagger and scores of other famous rock and jazz musicians. Among a number of accomplishments, he’s been listed by Rolling Stone as one of the top five drummers of all time, and he won a Grammy award for best rock instrumental on Jeff Beck’s 1990 album, “Jeff Beck’s Guitar Shop.”

The California-born Bozzio got his start on drums at a young age in the 1950s and, after seeing The Beatles perform on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964, begged his father for formal lessons. He’s been touring constantly since the 1970s and next Thursday, September 6, he brings his unique solo show to Northampton’s Iron Horse Music Hall at 7 p.m.

The Gazette spoke with the celebrated drummer by phone ahead of his performance, which will feature Bozzio performing compositions that draw from jazz, classical, and ethnic percussion styles across the world on his massive custom drum kit (26 toms, two snares, eight bass drums, 53 cymbals, 22 pedals, including xylophone, glockenspiel, gongs, and two electronic drums).

And Bozzi’s show is much more than just a “bombastic two hour drum solo,” according to the Iron Horse. The veteran drummer combines classical forms and structures, ambient electronic loops, atmospheric percussion effects, looped bass sounds, and a number of other sounds.

Daily Hampshire Gazette: Could you tell me how you developed your current musical project building these musical compositions on percussion?

Terry Bozzio: I try to improvise in a compositional way. It’s not just throwaway soloing or licks. It’s thematic and developmental. Over the years, that’s just become what I do … It’s not a typical, Ginger-Baker-type long rock solo. At least 10 or so compositions have a wide variety of feels and textures and moods.

DHG: What was it like working with Frank Zappa, specifically on “Baby Snakes”? (Zappa’s legendary 1977 Halloween concert at New York City’s Palladium Theater, which was later released as a concert film including footage of backstage antics)


TB: Everything was. It was more at the beginning. You kind of get used to the work and the level of intensity. Being with Frank was a very intense situation … Every day there was a sound check and a rehearsal, and we would do new arrangements.

We were kind of like Army training or boot camp. You just really dug in, and music was your life. That was a fantastic experience. Plus the guy was such a genius, was so funny, and great to be around. I consider myself very lucky to have had that opportunity to play with him.

DHG: You’ve performed with a ton of famous musicians throughout the years. Who are some of your favorites, and what did you like about performing with them?

TB: One of my favorite bass players and dearest friends is Patrick O’Hearn, and we’ve done a lot of things together. We used to play jazz together with Eddie Henderson, Joe Henderson, and Woody Shaw, and Julian Priester — all the great jazz musicians that came to San Francisco in the early 1970s.

And then, I would say in terms of projects one of the favorite things I’ve ever done was [instrumental improvisational group HoBoLeMa] with Allan Holdsworth, Tony Levin, and Pat Mastelotto … Jeff Beck was another great instrumentalist and just unmatched in his sound and tone and his expression. I loved playing with Jeff.

DHG: What initially led to you becoming a drummer, and who were some of your biggest influences during your formative years?

TB: I would imagine seeing Little Ricky on the “I Love Lucy Show” and Cubby O’Brien on “The Mickey Mouse Club” in the 1950s on black and white TV. Those were the first two children that I saw play drums. I probably assumed it was an adult activity until then. That was a moment I can remember.

And my dad had a Tito Puente album and we had a kind of end table that was a set of three nesting tables. They were solid wood and they had three different tones, so I would call the nesting tables my bongos and I would play along with Tito Puente.

DHG: Is touring different now compared to when you were younger?

TB: Absolutely. You have these levels that you work on. The jazz level is you throw the drums in the back of your car and you go to play in San Francisco or something, and then you’re thrown in the Zappa level … I’d never even seen these big lighting rigs. So, that level was private bus, private planes sometimes, or flying commercially. It’s something you adapt to, but everything’s provided for you at that level. The same with Jeff Beck; a very high level of touring.

And then there’s projects you do out of love. You maybe rent a van and pile in with the three guys you’re playing with and make it work. I come to find in my solo situation, having done drum clinics, that maybe the company would send a pick-up kit for me to use. [But then] – I can’t adjust things the way I like.

So, I thought, ‘Okay, I need to have my own drum set everywhere.’ We have an SUV and a trailer and that’s the best way to go. It takes longer and it’s more expensive because you’re driving a lot between big states. You eat up at least $500 a day just traveling, and every off day is losing money, but that’s the way to do it. I have my wife with me and our trusted tech and the drums are in the trailer in the back.

DHG: Are there any projects in the works that you’re really excited about now?

TB: “Reality” is a project I recorded in 1991. I just went into the studio with a beatbox and my drums and just made up sections and breakdowns and solo sections based on very melodic beatbox patterns; not like hip-hop, but more African sounds. I basically had this empty bunch of drum tracks, and since 1991 I’d been working on that. I finally finished it over five or six technological overturns.

That’s a really beautiful project. The first two tunes are my favorite. They have flute that I play through a vocoder [an instrument that replicates the human voice], which has a kind of a Weather Report-ish feel to them. It’s almost like a hybrid musical experience with classical and film and ambients and electronics mixed together.

Image

Me and my brother will be there at the Iron Horse this thursday nite. Gonna try to get a seat up in the "loft" for a birds eye view. If nothing else, it will be an interesting evening.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 5:21 pm 
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I would LOVE to see that!

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:22 pm 
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cozylittlefooties wrote:
Me and my brother will be there at the Iron Horse this thursday nite. Gonna try to get a seat up in the "loft" for a birds eye view. If nothing else, it will be an interesting evening.

Did you make it to the show?


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 3:18 am 
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cory1984 wrote:
cozylittlefooties wrote:
Me and my brother will be there at the Iron Horse this thursday nite. Gonna try to get a seat up in the "loft" for a birds eye view. If nothing else, it will be an interesting evening.

Did you make it to the show?

Oh yeah... and it was both interesting AND amazing. We did get our seats up in the loft for an unobstructed "in the air" view. Little Terry Ted has grown and matured since the Bongo Fury days. Backed by soft computer generated sounds/music he not only drummed along, but provided percussionary (if there is such a word) notes that pushed the melodic envelope emanating from a drum kit. A good dose of African rythms filled the air. Remote pedals aplenty, he managed to keep steady beats all the while playing complex, structured pieces. Claiming Varese and Stravinsky were his major influences (sound familiar?) he often left his stool to strike a variety of extraneous "instruments" to produce an Ionaztions feel. Of course there were "Freebird" type calls for such things as Punkys Whips and Baby Snakes. Totally out of place for this type of atmosphere. At one point when he realized one of his toms was out of tune someone shouted "Frank would never allow That". Probably the same dude that called for Punky. THIS WAS NOT MEANT TO BE ANY TYPE OF FZ TYPE CONCERT.
He spoke with the audience frequently exercising his proficiency on very complicated technical knowledge of frequencies and such that probably went right over most everybody heads (including mine!)
Sadly no meet and greet or handshake/autograph session that I've gotten used to with so many artists but that aside, quite an amazing, mesmerizing evening. 4 stars out of 5.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 3:33 am 
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cozylittlefooties wrote:
cory1984 wrote:
cozylittlefooties wrote:
Me and my brother will be there at the Iron Horse this thursday nite. Gonna try to get a seat up in the "loft" for a birds eye view. If nothing else, it will be an interesting evening.

Did you make it to the show?

Oh yeah... and it was both interesting AND amazing. We did get our seats up in the loft for an unobstructed "in the air" view. Little Terry Ted has grown and matured since the Bongo Fury days. Backed by soft computer generated sounds/music he not only drummed along, but provided percussionary (if there is such a word) notes that pushed the melodic envelope emanating from a drum kit. A good dose of African rythms filled the air. Remote pedals aplenty, he managed to keep steady beats all the while playing complex, structured pieces. Claiming Varese and Stravinsky were his major influences (sound familiar?) he often left his stool to strike a variety of extraneous "instruments" to produce an Ionaztions feel. Of course there were "Freebird" type calls for such things as Punkys Whips and Baby Snakes. Totally out of place for this type of atmosphere. At one point when he realized one of his toms was out of tune someone shouted "Frank would never allow That". Probably the same dude that called for Punky. THIS WAS NOT MEANT TO BE ANY TYPE OF FZ TYPE CONCERT.
He spoke with the audience frequently exercising his proficiency on very complicated technical knowledge of frequencies and such that probably went right over most everybody heads (including mine!)
Sadly no meet and greet or handshake/autograph session that I've gotten used to with so many artists but that aside, quite an amazing, mesmerizing evening. 4 stars out of 5.

Oh, and by the way, I miss Trip and all his great posts. Anyone have any idea what became of him?


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 8:49 am 
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cozylittlefooties wrote:
cory1984 wrote:
cozylittlefooties wrote:
Me and my brother will be there at the Iron Horse this thursday nite. Gonna try to get a seat up in the "loft" for a birds eye view. If nothing else, it will be an interesting evening.

Did you make it to the show?

Oh yeah... and it was both interesting AND amazing. We did get our seats up in the loft for an unobstructed "in the air" view. Little Terry Ted has grown and matured since the Bongo Fury days. Backed by soft computer generated sounds/music he not only drummed along, but provided percussionary (if there is such a word) notes that pushed the melodic envelope emanating from a drum kit. A good dose of African rythms filled the air. Remote pedals aplenty, he managed to keep steady beats all the while playing complex, structured pieces. Claiming Varese and Stravinsky were his major influences (sound familiar?) he often left his stool to strike a variety of extraneous "instruments" to produce an Ionaztions feel. Of course there were "Freebird" type calls for such things as Punkys Whips and Baby Snakes. Totally out of place for this type of atmosphere. At one point when he realized one of his toms was out of tune someone shouted "Frank would never allow That". Probably the same dude that called for Punky. THIS WAS NOT MEANT TO BE ANY TYPE OF FZ TYPE CONCERT.
He spoke with the audience frequently exercising his proficiency on very complicated technical knowledge of frequencies and such that probably went right over most everybody heads (including mine!)
Sadly no meet and greet or handshake/autograph session that I've gotten used to with so many artists but that aside, quite an amazing, mesmerizing evening. 4 stars out of 5.

Was there any merch?


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:14 am 
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KU the Merch King, I envision his home could easily bee turned in to a merch stand... :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 10:17 am 
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Plook wrote:
KU the Merch King, I envision his home could easily bee turned in to a merch stand... :mrgreen:

^^My t-shirt drawer and hat rack are overflowing not that that is going to slow me down :mrgreen:. I still have some prime space on the walls for posters though. I just had to go for the Alice Cooper bobblehead at the last show.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 1:11 pm 
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cozylittlefooties wrote:
Oh yeah... and it was both interesting AND amazing. We did get our seats up in the loft for an unobstructed "in the air" view. Little Terry Ted has grown and matured since the Bongo Fury days. Backed by soft computer generated sounds/music he not only drummed along, but provided percussionary (if there is such a word) notes that pushed the melodic envelope emanating from a drum kit. A good dose of African rythms filled the air. Remote pedals aplenty, he managed to keep steady beats all the while playing complex, structured pieces. Claiming Varese and Stravinsky were his major influences (sound familiar?) he often left his stool to strike a variety of extraneous "instruments" to produce an Ionaztions feel. Of course there were "Freebird" type calls for such things as Punkys Whips and Baby Snakes. Totally out of place for this type of atmosphere. At one point when he realized one of his toms was out of tune someone shouted "Frank would never allow That". Probably the same dude that called for Punky. THIS WAS NOT MEANT TO BE ANY TYPE OF FZ TYPE CONCERT.
He spoke with the audience frequently exercising his proficiency on very complicated technical knowledge of frequencies and such that probably went right over most everybody heads (including mine!)
Sadly no meet and greet or handshake/autograph session that I've gotten used to with so many artists but that aside, quite an amazing, mesmerizing evening. 4 stars out of 5.


Holy shit ! That sounds like an amazing show. Thanks for the critique.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:25 pm 
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Just got my TB tick for 10/7. Really looking forward to this.

www.harlows.com/event/1715219-terry-boz ... acramento/


Last edited by KUIII on Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:29 pm 
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KUIII wrote:
Just got my TB tick for 10/7. Really looking forward to this.



Is this at the Crest?


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:31 pm 
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Plook wrote:
KUIII wrote:
Just got my TB tick for 10/7. Really looking forward to this.



Is this at the Crest?

Harlows. See above.

This is the last show of a 31 date tour. Kind of interesting that this is the only show in California. No Bay Area, No SoCal.


Last edited by KUIII on Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:37 pm 
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KUIII wrote:
Plook wrote:
KUIII wrote:
Just got my TB tick for 10/7. Really looking forward to this.



Is this at the Crest?

Harlows. See above.



May want to go... :idea:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:40 pm 
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^^^You should. Only $30 and living as close as you do. Bring RG.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 4:13 pm 
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KUIII wrote:
^^^You should. Only $30 and living as close as you do. Bring RG.



I'm debating being a possible maybe on the fence that may go... :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 2:33 am 
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The merch consisted of signed drumheads and an assortment of the usual cd's, a TB tee and misc other stuff. I really didn't look that close as I too am overflowing in the t-shirt dept.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 7:12 am 
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I saw Terry last night in Sacramento. Cool, unique concert experience. Terry’s drum/percussion compositions ranged from the ethereal to the visceral sometimes in the same piece and he’s still got the monster chops. During each set (there was about a twenty minute intermission) he spoke about some of the unique instruments he was using, his gig relationship with the Drum Channel and DW drums, his crew (his wife and his roadie/sound man), his music available, his influences, a music theory lesson/demonstration on time signatures) and some fun stories including the time he introduced Patrick O’Hearn to FZ which led to an all night recording session. Nice intimate environment in an about half full nightclub. A fair amount of younger and females were in attendance. When Terry asked how many drummers were in attendance about 20% of the room raised their hands. I bought a couple of CDs and a TB tank top.


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