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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 12:29 pm 
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We love our sharks - and could make the ultimate Sharknado flick, could do Crocnado vs Sharknado.
Anyone want to be my financial backer on this one :smoke:


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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 1:17 pm 
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This is Belmont Shores on the Southern Tip of Long Beach where 99.9 days has no surf due to breakwater to protect the harbor of Long Beach and the oil drilling islands just off shore

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But on rare occasions with a certain combination of conditions aligning this can happen

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:55 pm 
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....I don't care if her legs start achin'
I'm A California Man!

- Cheap Trick '78

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:32 pm 
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Baja California

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:31 pm 
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Rockaway Beach is tucked in between Pacifica and South San Francisco (a spot Terri and I frequented often

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Northside
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Southside
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2017 3:13 am 
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Twelve Apostles Great Ocean Road Australia
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2017 3:48 am 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
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Yee Haa, it's Piha

Lion Rock

West Coast of New Zealand


California 10,644 km on the left.....only 15 hours and 50 minutes by jet

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 1:42 pm 
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Point Breaks

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Rincon

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Malibu

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Hollister Ranch

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 12:39 pm 
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more Baja California

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:33 pm 
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Wildfires are destroying the city of Ventura right now. Strong offshore winds are expected to last though Thursday.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:35 pm 
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Sad that the Santa Ana winds are causing such fire destruction, but they are good for the surf... :arrow:

Newport Beach

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Huntington Beach

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Bolsa Chica State Beach

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 12:10 pm 
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Black's Beach, San Diego County

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I probably had the best session of my life at this spot.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 2:00 pm 
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Often Loved, Many Times Loathed
Santa Ana winds are a blessing and a curse for surfers across California


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They can turn average surf into something exceptional, and a lifetime of memories into ash. The start of December entertained both sides of the Santa Ana coin; a series of mostly fun size swells from the North Pacific and even a decent off-season visit from the South Pacific, paired with an extended run of excellent conditions (for surf).

Unfortunately, the Santa Ana’s grooming conditions far and wide across Southern California were stoking the flames of a wildfire outbreak with a magnitude reminiscent of the 2007 installment giving us the Fire Swells.

While the Lilac, Rye, Creek and Skirball Fire’s brought abundant smoke, ash, and worry, they pale in comparison to the extent of the Thomas Fire. As of writing, the latter has consumed more than 272,000 acres across Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, shaking the core of the tight-knit surf communities that call this stretch of coast home.

Currently the second largest wildfire in California history, and now only trailing the Cedar Fire by just over 1000 acres, there is potential the Thomas Fire will become the largest wildfire in modern California history before all is said and done.

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So what sets the stage for such an outbreak?

To gain a better understanding of what created the climate for a fire as expansive as the Thomas Incident, it is important to understand the last several years through coastal California. After years of record-breaking drought, last winter was prolific for precipitation and subsequently scrub/fuel growth that allows rapid expanse of wildfires. Through the summer we dried out, per-usual, but the start of this water year (October to present) has been especially dry. Counting little in the way of appreciable precipitation across SoCal through this period means we’ve been bone dry since last spring.

The start of the water year in October generally kicks off a number of important features; we start to see meaningful precipitation and the seasonal return of Santa Ana winds. The return of offshore wind events, paired with three active swell sources (North Pacific, South Pacific, and tropics) is key to making October such a great surf month for California. The return of meaningful precipitation, especially by December, tends to temper wildfire risk.

Unfortunately, when you pair seasonal counts of Santa Ana events through October and November with little to no rain, things dry out very rapidly. Lock a Ridiculously Resilient Ridge over the West Coast to start December and we reach a fever pitch. As high pressure built over the Great Basin on December 4th, following an inside slider type low (low moving into the Pacific Northwest and dropping through the Great Basin), we kicked off 12 consecutive days of offshore flow and Red Flag Warnings with a very strong Santa Ana event.

With appreciable swell running the majority of those days; most surf communities through SoCal were graced with morning offshores and dreamy, glassy afternoons. Ventura and Santa Barbara, and even as far north as Cambria, were often more apocalyptic as smoke from the Thomas Fire filled the air.

While less potent, a typical Santa Ana pattern develops Thursday (12/21), as a low dropping through the Great Basin is replaced with building high pressure bringing moderate to locally breezy offshore flow. Morning offshore flow is lighter as it lingers through the end of the week.

At this point the reputable models continue to keep Southern California very dry through the end of the year, and suggest we’ll see another moderate to strong Santa Ana event before December is done. A ridge remains the dominant feature along the West Coast, driving storms mainly north and east of California. This keeps conditions for surf favorable on the whole, though we will see onshore flow many afternoons. So, while the bouts of Santa Ana flow remain problematic for the containment of active fires, the days with afternoon onshore flow should allow firefighters to make up ground.

With a decent run of selective SSE swell through Christmas and potential for more fun WNW swell between Christmas and the end of the year, we’ll oblige the clean mornings in lieu of afternoon onshores. Looking to early January, the climate models suggest at least an increased chance for storms along the West Coast to start the New Year. That isn’t saying much, but is worth a little hope.

La Nina years favor lower than normal precipitation for coastal California, especially Southern California, and the return of the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge over the West Coast doesn't bode well for our precipitation outlook. Already feeling the squeeze of a dry start to the season, we hope January brings meaningful precipitation in tolerable increments. Any installments of the Atmospheric Rivers that were the norm last winter would be terrible news for recent burn areas, which are especially susceptible to mudslides and debris flows during heavy rains.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 3:06 pm 
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The fires are mostly out. Now we got rain on the way.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 1:52 pm 
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This makes California ripe for mudslides... :idea:

Last year I was unable to use Hwy 1 to get to the Centtral Coast on my vacation for the first time since I have lived in Norcal (25 years)... :shock:

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This happened 3 years ago in Socal... :(

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Another one from December 2014 in the Socal... :evil:

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 3:18 pm 
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^ Hopefullly, no homes or vehicles will be involved.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 5:24 pm 
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Chris Britt
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:23 am 
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Location: the siege perilous
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:21 am 
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coevad wrote:
^ Hopefullly, no homes or vehicles will be involved.

It rained hard all night. There's mud everywhere.

Stay safe California.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:08 am 
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Oh no. A few fatalities have been reported.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 11:57 pm 
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:shock:

Several die as mud sweeps away homes in California wildfire burn areas
CHRISTOPHER WEBER
Last updated 14:07, January 10 2018


A mud-caked US teenager has been rescued from the aftermath of a deluge that killed more than a dozen people after 13mm of rain fell in five minutes.

Homes in Montecito, California, a wealthy enclave of about 9000 people northwest of Los Angeles, were swept away in the debris flow that formed as rain rushed off hills left bare last month by the state's largest-ever wildfire over ground decimated by a massive wildfire.

"I thought I was dead for a minute there," the girl could be heard saying on video posted by KNBC-TV before she was taken away on a stretcher by her rescuers, some just as covered in mud as she was.
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DANIEL DREIFUS/AP
A car and debris were smashed against a tree along Hot Springs Road. Homes were swept from their foundations as heavy rain sent mud and boulders sliding down hills stripped of vegetation by a gigantic wildfire that raged in Southern California last month.

All of the deaths - 13 so far, but a figure that's expected to rise - were believed to have occurred in Montecito, home to such celebrities as Oprah Winfrey, Rob Lowe and Ellen DeGeneres, said Santa Barbara County spokesman David Villalobos. At least 25 people were injured.

The mud was unleashed in the dead of night by flash flooding in the steep, fire-scarred Santa Ynez Mountains. Burned-over zones are especially susceptible to destructive mudslides because scorched earth doesn't absorb water well and the land is easily eroded when there are no shrubs.

Rescue crews used helicopters to pluck people from rooftops because debris blocked roads, and firefighters pulled the mud-caked 14-year-old girl from the collapsed home where she had been trapped for hours.

The torrent of mud early Tuesday swept away cars and destroyed several homes, reducing them to piles of timber. Photos posted online showed waist-deep mud in living rooms.
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Firefighters rescue a 14-year-old girl, right, after she was trapped for hours inside a destroyed home in Montecito, California. Photo: MIKE ELIASON/Santa Barbara County Fire Department
Some residents were unaccounted for in neighbourhoods hard to reach because of downed trees and power lines, Santa Barbara County Fire Department spokesman Dave Zaniboni said.

"I came around the house and heard a deep rumbling, an ominous sound I knew was ... boulders moving as the mud was rising," said Thomas Tighe, who discovered two of his cars missing from the driveway. "I saw two other vehicles moving slowly sideways down the middle of the street in a river of mud."

Authorities had been bracing for the possibility of catastrophic flooding because of heavy rain in the forecast for the first time in 10 months.
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MIKE ELIASON/Santa Barbara County Fire Department
Mud and debris flow past a damaged house in Montecito, an area which had 12.5mm of rain fall in five minutes.

SOBERING EXPERIENCE

Evacuations were ordered beneath recently burned areas of Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties. But only an estimated 10 to 15 per cent of people in a mandatory evacuation area of Santa Barbara County heeded the warning, authorities said.

Marshall Miller, who evacuated his home in Montecito on Monday with his family, returned to check for damage and found his neighbourhood devastated. He never reached his home because two of his neighbours, an elderly woman and her adult daughter, needed a lift to the hospital after being rescued by firefighters.
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MIKE ELIASON/AP
The main line of the Union Pacific Railroad through Montecito is blocked with mudflow and debris which came down hills after a storm that saw 13mm of rain fall in 5 minutes.

The pair had left their house before it was inundated with 1.8 metres of mud, but they got trapped outside in the deep muck.

"It was sobering," Miller said. "I saw them covered in mud and shaking from the cold."

The path of the deluge was graphically illustrated on the side of a white colonial-style house, where a dark gray stain created a wavy pattern halfway up the front windows.

Cars were washed off roads, and one was deposited upside down in a tangle of tree limbs. In Los Angeles, a police cruiser got swamped in tire-deep mud.

A stretch of US Highway 101 that connects Ventura County to Santa Barbara County looked like a muddy river clogged with trees and other debris. A kayak was marooned in the flotsam, and a Range Rover was buried up to its bumpers.

COLOSSAL DOWNPOUR, 'ALL HELL BROKE LOOSE'
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DANIEL DRIEFUSS/AP
A member of the Long Beach Search and Rescue team looks for survivors in a car in Montecito.

Some of the worst damage was on Montecito's Hot Springs Road, where the unidentified girl was rescued and residents had been under a voluntary evacuation warning. Large boulders were washed out of a previously dry creek bed and scattered across the road.

A rescuer working with a search dog walked among the ruins of a house as the yellow Labrador wagged its tail and scrambled into a devastated building, looking for anyone trapped inside. Its belly and paws were black from the mud.

Forecasters said the maximum rainfall occurred in a 15-minute span starting at 3.30am near the Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria areas of Santa Barbara County. Montecito got more than 12.5mm in five minutes, while Carpinteria received 21.8mm in 15 minutes.
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MIKE ELIASON/AP
A K-9 search and rescue team walks into an area of debris and mud flow. The death toll is expected to rise, with many people still missing.

"All hell broke loose," said Peter Hartmann, a dentist who moonlights as a news photographer.

"There were gas mains that had popped, where you could hear the hissing," he said. "Power lines were down, high-voltage power lines, the large aluminum poles to hold those were snapped in half. Water was flowing out of water mains and sheared-off fire hydrants."

Hartmann watched rescuers revive a toddler pulled unresponsive from the muck.
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MIKE ELIASON/Santa Barbara County Fire Department
Fire burns canyons and ridges above Bella Vista Drive near Romero Canyon in Montecito. After the fires, a deluge brought down rocks, debris and mud, leaving many people trapped or missing.

"It was a freaky moment to see her just covered in mud," he said. "It was scary."

Hartmann said he found a father-son tennis trophy awarded in 1991 to men his wife knows.

"Both of them were caught in the flood. Son's in the hospital, dad hasn't been found yet," he said, declining to name them.
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AP
A photo from the Ventura County Sheriff's Office shows an aerial view of Montecito. Many homes have been inundated with waist-high mud.

The communities are beneath the scar left by a wildfire that erupted December 4 and became the largest ever recorded in California. It spread over more than 1140 square kilometres and destroyed 1063 homes and other structures. It continues to smolder deep in the wilderness.

The storm walloped much of the state with damaging winds and thunderstorms. Downtown San Francisco got a record 80mm of rain on Monday, smashing the old mark of 60mm set in 1872.

GRIM SIGHTS, DEATH TOLL GROWS

In the dark of night, Thomas Tighe saw two vehicles slowly being swept away by a river of mud and debris flowing down the road in front of his house in Montecito. Daybreak brought a more jarring scene: A body pinned against his neighbour's home by a wall of muck.

Tighe is CEO of a charitable organisation that helps disaster victims. This time, the disaster was "literally in my backyard, and front yard", he said by phone from Montecito, 145km northwest of Los Angeles.

The scene left Tighe shaken. His voice quivered and he paused several times as he described seeing the body, repeating several times it's "just so devastating".

Those killed included Roy Rohter, a former real estate broker who founded St. Augustine Academy, a Catholic K-12 school in Ventura, Headmaster Michael Van Hecke said.

"Roy believed intensely in the power of a Catholic education," Van Hecke said. "He's been a deep supporter of the school in every way and a mentor to me personally, to the faculty and to the kids."

Rohter's wife, Theresa, was rescued by firefighters from their home and was taken to a hospital with several broken bones, Van Hecke said.

Last month the Rohters were among thousands forced from their home by the wildfire and spent a week living with Van Hecke and his family.

Tighe, whose charity provided breathing masks to residents during the fire, said he was outside his home about 3.30am checking downspouts when the rain intensified.

"I came around the house and heard a deep rumbling, an ominous sound that I knew was the boulders moving as the mud was rising," he said.

Two of his cars that had been in the driveway already were swept away, and he saw two other vehicles drifting down the road.

With his street thick with rushing mud it was too late to heed the area's voluntary evacuation advisory so he woke his wife and children and prepared to get them up to the roof.

"I tried not to panic them, but I panicked them," Tighe said.

For the next three hours he and his neighbours did what they could to keep their houses from being inundated. When daylight came the devastation came into focus.

He watched in shock as rescuers plucked a family from their roof, where they had been huddled for several hours with a 3-month-old child. There were car-sized boulders and chunks of buildings on the street.

Tighe and his family trudged through thigh-deep mud to his sister's nearby house. Just one street away, it was a dramatically different scene. No debris, just puddles.

"Everything was fine," Tighe said.

- AP

https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/ ... burn-areas

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:18 am 
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^ I saw that girl getting rescued from the mudslide on the morning news. Her parents are still missing.




Rain is gone. Sunny and warm this weekend.

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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:52 am 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:03 am 
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 Post subject: Re: California
PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 10:51 am 
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