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 Post subject: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2020 1:36 pm 
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Hi y'all,

I thought you might enjoy a video interview I did with Samuel Andreyev a couple of weeks ago. Samuel is a Canadian composer who lives and teaches in Strasbourg, FR at Syracuse University. It's a long interview (1' 54"), so you'll need a beverage...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugMep20elgQ

Here also is a long article I wrote entitled Zappa vs. Beefheart: What Were They Really Like?

http://www.beefheart.com/zappa-vs-beefh ... art-tripp/

Hope you enjoy them!

~Art Tripp


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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2020 7:31 am 
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gulfportdoc wrote:
Hi y'all,

I thought you might enjoy a video interview I did with Samuel Andreyev a couple of weeks ago. Samuel is a Canadian composer who lives and teaches in Strasbourg, FR at Syracuse University. It's a long interview (1' 54"), so you'll need a beverage...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugMep20elgQ

Here also is a long article I wrote entitled Zappa vs. Beefheart: What Were They Really Like?

http://www.beefheart.com/zappa-vs-beefh ... art-tripp/

Hope you enjoy them!

~Art Tripp


Interesting video and article!


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 Post subject: Re: from art tripp
PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2020 8:13 am 
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great article about beefheart and zappa.

thanks. 8)

(haven't watched the video yet...)

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 Post subject: Re: from art tripp
PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2020 8:19 am 
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Lumpy Gravy wrote:
great article about beefheart and zappa.

thanks. 8)

(haven't watched the video yet...)


MOOP wrote:
Interesting video and article!


+1

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2020 3:36 pm 
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Thank you Mr. Tripp

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 Post subject: Re: from art tripp
PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 3:56 pm 
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a question for you, mr. tripp;

could you tell us a little bit about the track nine types of industrial pollution from the uncle meat album?

of course, it's a great zappa guitar solo, but I have always been wondering who played the drums and percussion in the background. 8)

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2020 11:19 am 
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"could you tell us a little bit about the track nine types of industrial pollution from the uncle meat album? of course, it's a great zappa guitar solo, but I have always been wondering who played the drums and percussion in the background"

Hi there,

I played all the miscellaneous percussion, which Frank overdubbed onto the track. As far as I know, Billy Mundi played the track's basic drumset. It was actually a rather slow 3/4 blues piece, recorded before Billy left the MOI, after which Frank added the other stuff. I had done quite a bit of solo percussion recording at Apostolic Studio in NYC soon after I joined. Frank used parts from those on a number of albums, including YCDTOSAM. I think those solo percussion sessions were mentioned in the Samuel Andreyev interview on YouTube.

~Art Tripp



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 Post subject: Re: from art tripp
PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2020 1:25 pm 
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Quote:
Hi there,

I played all the miscellaneous percussion, which Frank overdubbed onto the track. As far as I know, Billy Mundi played the track's basic drumset. It was actually a rather slow 3/4 blues piece, recorded before Billy left the MOI, after which Frank added the other stuff. I had done quite a bit of solo percussion recording at Apostolic Studio in NYC soon after I joined. Frank used parts from those on a number of albums, including YCDTOSAM. I think those solo percussion sessions were mentioned in the Samuel Andreyev interview on YouTube.

~Art Tripp



awesome. a mystery solved, after all these years. thank you. 8)

I haven't watched the video yet...

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2020 11:37 am 
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Posts: 546
What can you tell us about the making of "Clear Spot"? It doesn't seem to be that highly regarded, but I bought a copy in a cut-out bin and played it non-stop for about three months. Still love it. Luckily I still have a few shrink-wrapped back ups!


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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2020 2:22 pm 
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Clear Spot is a Master Piece

How the hell can one believe that the man behind the drumkit on that album is the same man playing percussion on Nine Types.....
All that percussion at the Royal Festival all in '68

Mr Tripp, you are amazing

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 Post subject: Re: from art tripp
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2020 3:49 pm 
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b u m p

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 Post subject: Re: from art tripp
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2020 3:07 am 
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Lumpy Gravy wrote:
Quote:
Hi there,

I played all the miscellaneous percussion, which Frank overdubbed onto the track. As far as I know, Billy Mundi played the track's basic drumset. It was actually a rather slow 3/4 blues piece, recorded before Billy left the MOI, after which Frank added the other stuff. I had done quite a bit of solo percussion recording at Apostolic Studio in NYC soon after I joined. Frank used parts from those on a number of albums, including YCDTOSAM. I think those solo percussion sessions were mentioned in the Samuel Andreyev interview on YouTube.

~Art Tripp



awesome. a mystery solved, after all these years. thank you. 8)

I haven't watched the video yet...

Some solo percussion fragments have been released on Finer Moments, called "Enigmas 1 Thru 5", but recorded at Sunset Sound. The Nine Types Of Industrial Pollution guitar solo can be heard in original tempo on Meat Light.


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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2020 8:58 am 
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Art, I caught the video interview with Samuel a few weeks ago and it was extremely entertaining and informative. I urge everyone here to take the time to see it.

Btw, Samuel has also done some nice interviews (not quite as good as this one, but still great) with all the surviving members of the Beefheart band on Trout Mask Replica.

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 10:17 am 
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^^Nice to see the feet aroud!

Very good interview, I enjoyed it a lot. Percussion and drums are such a spinal aspect of Frank Zappa's compositions and he was only able to achieve his vision it because of the amazing musicians he had around him (at least until the synclavier). Kudos for Mr. Tripp and thanks Mr Andreyev for the interview.

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2020 1:03 am 
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+1

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:47 am 
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Rahdley wrote:
What can you tell us about the making of "Clear Spot"? It doesn't seem to be that highly regarded, but I bought a copy in a cut-out bin and played it non-stop for about three months. Still love it. Luckily I still have a few shrink-wrapped back ups!

I'm glad that you liked the album, Rahdley. I remember less about the Clear Spot sessions than I do about most of the other CBMB albums. It was recorded at Amigo Studios in North Hollywood, which was a very nice facility. Since it was financed by Warner Bros., it seemed like we got the red carpet treatment.

The single advantage of that album and its material was that it was produced by the highly regarded Ted Templeman, who was at that time employed by Warner Bros. records. Ted was a very easy going guy, and had a great ear for commercial rock music-- both assets that we were in need of. As I recall, Ted came up to where we rehearsed in Trinidad, CA (north of Eureka) where he got to know all of us, and helped with arrangements and song selection. He also kept Don away, which allowed us to get more done in a timely fashion.

The sessions themselves were a pleasure. I was happy to be back in L.A. The studio was even close to a pool room I used to frequent called North Hollywood Billiards. The album went together in a very very professional --but relaxed-- fashion, which was enjoyable from start to finish.

I'd say that Clear Spot was the best produced Beefheart album of them all. Some of the material, if recorded by someone without our avant-garde reputation, would probably have been a commercial success, and may have led them to a successful career. As it was, I have a feeling that the public --and many of our existing fans-- did not cotton to us doing more commercial sounding music. The band had started into more of an accessible sound with The Spotlight Kid, and ended with the unfortunate Unconditionally Guaranteed.

After UG I don't think the pattern could have continued. A group either has to have an inherent understanding of commercial material, or they must be produced by a Ted Templeman. You might be surprised to hear that I believed UG had the best "time" and feel of any of the albums, but it was ruined by the production, and by amping up the voice so loud that the music could hardly be heard.

In hindsight we'd have been better off sticking with Decals/Spotlight Kid material. By the time they did Shiny Beast, they'd gotten into a nice groove. I played on the album as a side man, as I'd already left the group.

Cheers,
~Art Tripp


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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2020 7:25 am 
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gulfportdoc wrote:
Rahdley wrote:
What can you tell us about the making of "Clear Spot"? It doesn't seem to be that highly regarded, but I bought a copy in a cut-out bin and played it non-stop for about three months. Still love it. Luckily I still have a few shrink-wrapped back ups!

I'm glad that you liked the album, Rahdley. I remember less about the Clear Spot sessions than I do about most of the other CBMB albums. It was recorded at Amigo Studios in North Hollywood, which was a very nice facility. Since it was financed by Warner Bros., it seemed like we got the red carpet treatment.

The single advantage of that album and its material was that it was produced by the highly regarded Ted Templeman, who was at that time employed by Warner Bros. records. Ted was a very easy going guy, and had a great ear for commercial rock music-- both assets that we were in need of. As I recall, Ted came up to where we rehearsed in Trinidad, CA (north of Eureka) where he got to know all of us, and helped with arrangements and song selection. He also kept Don away, which allowed us to get more done in a timely fashion.

The sessions themselves were a pleasure. I was happy to be back in L.A. The studio was even close to a pool room I used to frequent called North Hollywood Billiards. The album went together in a very very professional --but relaxed-- fashion, which was enjoyable from start to finish.

I'd say that Clear Spot was the best produced Beefheart album of them all. Some of the material, if recorded by someone without our avant-garde reputation, would probably have been a commercial success, and may have led them to a successful career. As it was, I have a feeling that the public --and many of our existing fans-- did not cotton to us doing more commercial sounding music. The band had started into more of an accessible sound with The Spotlight Kid, and ended with the unfortunate Unconditionally Guaranteed.

After UG I don't think the pattern could have continued. A group either has to have an inherent understanding of commercial material, or they must be produced by a Ted Templeman. You might be surprised to hear that I believed UG had the best "time" and feel of any of the albums, but it was ruined by the production, and by amping up the voice so loud that the music could hardly be heard.

In hindsight we'd have been better off sticking with Decals/Spotlight Kid material. By the time they did Shiny Beast, they'd gotten into a nice groove. I played on the album as a side man, as I'd already left the group.

Cheers,
~Art Tripp

Thanks for this Mr. Tripp! :shock: :mrgreen: :shock: :mrgreen:

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:36 pm 
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Mr Tripp, something that has intrigued me for years.......
You do not cross your right hand over your left arm to play the hi-hat.

The coordination is between the right foot and the hand usually, or left foot and left hand (like me who is left handed)......
What led you to play the way that you did? It seems to me to be unique?

PS - amazing that you are posting on the forum

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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:26 am 
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Art,

Thanks for the info on Clear Spot!


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 Post subject: Re: From Art Tripp
PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:27 pm 
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Cool stories. Thank you Dr. Tripp!

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