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 Post subject: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 1:40 pm 
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This is a scan from the new Quiet Sun re-issue.
It's from the Phil Manzanera biography...

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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 3:14 pm 
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I'm in the middle of reading Joe Jackson's book "A Cure For Gravity". He talks about the prog that was inspiring him around 1971 & 1972.

"...my favorite band was Soft Machine...I also liked King Crimson, especially for Robert Fripp's guitar playing. Then there were less well-remembered combos such as Caravan, Van Der Graf Generator, and Egg. And from the other side of the Atlantic, Captain Beefheart and Frank Zappa. Zappa's Hot Rats was a favorite, jazzy instrumentals being more to my taste at the time than the more song-oriented Mothers of Invention. Another favorite was King Kong, the album on which the jazz violinist Jean Luc-Ponty performed Zappa's compositions".

He also mentioned a gig by one of his (Jackson's) early bands where they played King Kong that turned out badly due to poor equipment and amplification. "...people walked out in droves. It was an unmitigated disaster".


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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 10:03 am 
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I saw Joe Jackson in Seattle in 2008 and "Dirty Love" was a cover he performed that night

How Kool was that

Peace


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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:48 am 
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When Joe Jackson toured in 2008, Dirty Love was a cover he would play occasionally

And Joe played Dirty Love in Seattle when I saw him

Peace all


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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2011 3:35 pm 
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When I saw Joe Jackson in Seattle in 2008 he played "Dirty Love" and commented on what an influence Frank was to him


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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 11:18 am 
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This is my third attempt to write that when Joe Jackson toured in 2008, he played "Dirty Love" in Seattle


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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2011 5:22 pm 
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Posts: 286
Hi,

I think Phil was more inspired by another guitarist ... that is not mentioned directly and one that was pretty similar in spirit to what the band Spirit (ohh my gawd ... the word used twice!) was doing. Randy Kalifornia even guested with Peter Hammil!

I don't think that Robert Fripp was the inspiration by himself ... when you can put on "Cheap Thrills" went out in mid 1968 ... and when you listen to "Ball and Chain" in there, that is one hell of an ass guitar and then some ... and while not many copied it right away, there were bands like Spooky Tooth, Deep Purple, that picked up on the loudness and ripped into it, and eventually created what became known as "metal", or simply loud rock music with an amazing blasting guitar that gave Janis her power and strength to compete with!

Today, after you sit and see ZPZ, Baby Snakes or play Mystery Roach, or some other things, there is one thing that you can say ... these people knew that Frank Zappa was out there, and even John Lennon had already mentioned that his work was excellent. But when you hear Steve Vai ply, even though it was quite later and Vai would fit into the 2nd generation, not the originals, you can see the inspirations and where they came from ...

It is my contention that London decided to call itself "progressive" because they wanted to be as important as San Francisco, or LA, or NY, all three of which were too fucked up and stoned and sex'd out to help define and make sure their art scene survived better and was not trashed as just stoned shit by a society hellbent on killing it.

Eventually, Jefferson Airplane, Quicksilver, Stoneground, Steve Miller, Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Tower of Power, The Doors, Spirit, Iron Butterfly, Steppenwolf and so many other California bands all burned out ... but the legacy they left behind? ... Frank Zappa was also there and deserves the credit, but I think that what bit him, is that he was a freak off for the Dr. Demento show off show, and was not really considered important music until a bit later ... but by then he was already stuck on the over use of bad lyrics that would carry through out all his work. Things like the album Chunga's Revenge ... check this out ... I got the album because I had heard the band Babe Ruth do a killer version of King Kong, and I finally told myself ... time to check out what Frank is all about ... and to be honest with you, to me, that's just about where Frank starts ... the early stuff is fun ... but after a while is a bit too much and tiring on the ears! I always thought that 200 Motels was ... the last goodbye to that shit! But he didn't say goodbye to it ... he changed it into better music and made the cuts longer, which helped his ability tremendously and made it more visible. But his credibility as a "composer" ... I doubt the LA Symphony will ever touch his material in our lifetime ... Zappa is not composition ... it's just rock music and crap! Go ask them ... they won't touch it ... it also means they are too lazy to take a challenge and they couldn't play a Frank Zappa piece if they rehearsed 200 years!

But there is another side that people don't know how to talk about because ... it's too weird. No one can relate to folks in Europe mentioning Frank as an inspiration, specially the likes of Faust in one of the covers blatantly saying they loved it ... but in my book, they misunderstood Frank because if anyone "knew" improvisation, the Germans did ... and they ended up calling it krautrock" because we did not want to give them the credit for creating something original! Even Frank was not that improvised ... when you see him conducting and realize that this is simply a really well rehearsed band ... with superlative musicians ... they would not be here if they weren't!

Go listen to Ball and Chain ... and yes, I can see Phil saying that the jazz and softer side of things was more to his liking -- you can certainly see that on his solo albums -- but you can also see his explosiveness in many Roxy Music albums that eimmediately bring to mind a gentleman that taught all those guitar screamers how to use the noise and ... but none of us has that Cheap Thrills album and can sit through Ball and Chain to know the difference.

Robert Fripp might be more interesting, but I think that he had enough sense to take the media "literally" ... and an acting exercise in full force ... let's play the guitar like I'm loving. Now let's playing like I'm hitting you. Now let's play like I'm angry and throwing rocks at you. And so forth ... and when you hear 21st Century Schizoid Man ... heck ... fuck me ... they were all over the news, in VietNam or IRA or Germany, or everywhere else ... so playing a guitar to make a point? ... well done Robert ... but I would imagine that Robert by that time had already heard Jimi Hendrix ... and ohh heck ... another guitarist out there was also doing Amazing Grace ... what a delicious way to use the guitar .... and yes, that is an exceptional album that also defined other things about rock music that Frank had not done, and I'm pretty sure that Frank noticed. I seriously doubt that we're going to find that album at the Zappa household, or that any of them will ever tell us what they had in there. Let me tell you that it was not only Varese I'm sure. And there is no way that Frank's ear had not heard Tangerine Dream, or all that other stuff and not know ... that different things were being done out there ...

One last thing ... that he was not aware of Stockhausen, Heinemann and other composers and their influence in "krautrock" when half of those people were all students with those guys ... in the same school even!


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 Post subject: Re: The Zappa Influence
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 12:28 am 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Grafton native pursues new musical and personal chapters

By Ed Karvoski Jr., Contributing Writer

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Bob Jordan (Photo/submitted)

Grafton – Singer, songwriter and guitarist Bob Jordan developed a lifetime of musical expertise performing in the Grafton and Worcester areas. His accomplishments are acknowledged in “A Grafton Chronicle” co-authored by Jayne Carroll Wilson and Joe Kuras, and “The Jazz Worcester Real Book” by Chet Williamson.

After frequent visits in recent years to Rochester, N.Y., Jordan relocated to continue his musical and personal journeys.

“I lived in Grafton for the first 65 years of my life,” he noted. “I decided to move to Rochester because I really like the cultural life and wanted a new chapter in my life.”

Jordan’s new life chapter includes his marriage with Lisa Kleman. They returned to his hometown to get married July 9 at the Grafton American Legion Delisle-Goulet Post 92.

“It was a big musical party,” he said of the wedding celebration. “We had over 100 people and about 35 musicians.”

His self-taught music education began at age 3 with a ukulele. At age 6, he figured how to play a Magnus Chord Organ. He fiddled with a toy guitar for several years. Then at 14, he received a Silvertone guitar from the Sears, Roebuck & Company catalog as a Christmas gift.

“By the time I got a real guitar, it took me about a day and a half to learn how to play it,” he recalled. “I got a Chuck Berry record and tried to imitate it.”

Soon afterward, Jordan partnered with his musician friends Joe Baskowski and Jeff Barnard, who passed away in 2010. They formed a band called the Unknowns and performed Saturday afternoons at a youth canteen downstairs at the Baptist Church of Grafton.

Next, Jordan joined the band Jimmy & the Pigs. Their first gig was Halloween 1967 at the town’s junior high school. The band began recording in 1968. Shortly after, they got chance to meet their rock music idol.

“We started recording the first time we got our hands on a real tape recorder,” Jordan explained. “The bandmates who started the group, Michael Ustin and Greg Ryerson, sent a reel-to-reel tape of our first practice via mail to Frank Zappa.”

Zappa personally made a couple phone calls until he reached a band member, Jordan noted. The teenage bandmates accepted Zappa’s invitation to attend his show at a Boston nightclub known as the Psychedelic Supermarket. There, Jordan and his friends got advice from Zappa to pursue their musical dream.

“He shook my hand, looked me in the eye and said, ‘Never stop doing it,’” Jordan relayed. “This guy was not the Frank Zappa that everybody saw onstage – a mean-spirited, almost devilish character. He was so supportive of us kids. It really moved him that he had inspired us to start a band in his image.”

Jordan continued performing with bands throughout his teen years. Beginning in 1974, he was one of a seven-piece band called Last Chance Oasis. They rehearsed three times weekly, recorded their original songs, and regularly performed gigs.

After Last Chance Oasis disbanded in 1976, Jordan became a deejay for 16 years at WCUW 91.3 FM in Worcester. Meeting recording artists led to work as a booking agent. He began booking legendary experimentalist musician Eugene Chadbourne in 1980, and periodically performed alongside him from 1989 to 1992. Jordan started releasing his own music in 1993.

“From ‘93 to ‘99, I put out cassette albums and played primarily solo, although I’d always hook up with other musicians if I could,” he said. “Since moving to Rochester, I’ve been thrown back into the solo route because I don’t know that many musicians here yet.”

Throughout this summer, Jordan is performing 15 farmers’ markets gigs. He has compiled a repertoire of 138 tunes. Grateful for guidance he received several decades ago, Jordan offers advice to budding musicians.

“The idea of celebrity that seduces a lot of people into playing music is an unhealthy aspiration,” he said. “If you’re doing it to try to get famous, rich or adulation, then you’re going to be disappointed. I’ve been fortunate that I’ve gotten a certain amount of recognition – but that’s not the reason you want to do it. Playing music is its own reward.”

For more information about Jordan, visit bobjordanmusic.com.

Short URL: http://www.communityadvocate.com/?p=91125

http://www.communityadvocate.com/2017/0 ... -chapters/

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