Zappa.com

The Official Frank Zappa Messageboards
It is currently Sat Apr 04, 2020 8:25 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7430 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
Image
Coffin-Joe, Zé do Caixão, Brazilian legendary cheap horror filmaker, 83...

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 11:40 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 9:28 pm
Posts: 5182
Location: in the tiny dirt somewhere
Sy Sperling, founder of Hair Club For Men, dead at 78:
Image

He was not only the founder; he was also a client...
Image

_________________
I'm petulant, and I'm having a frenzy...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
Larry Tesler: Computer scientist behind cut, copy and paste dies aged 74

Larry Tesler, an icon of early computing, has died at the age of 74.


Image

Mr Tesler started working in Silicon Valley in the early 1960s, at a time when computers were inaccessible to the vast majority of people.

It was thanks to his innovations - which included the "cut", "copy" and "paste" commands - that the personal computer became simple to learn and use.

Xerox, where Mr Tesler spent part of his career, paid tribute to him.

"The inventor of cut/copy & paste, find & replace, and more, was former Xerox researcher Larry Tesler," the company tweeted. "Your workday is easier thanks to his revolutionary ideas."

Mr Tesler was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1945, and studied at Stanford University in California.

fter graduating, he specialised in user interface design - that is, making computer systems more user-friendly.

He worked for a number of major tech firms during his long career. He started at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (Parc), before Steve Jobs poached him for Apple, where he spent 17 years and rose to chief scientist.

After leaving Apple he set up an education start-up, and worked for brief periods at Amazon and Yahoo.

In 2012, he told the BBC of Silicon Valley: "There's almost a rite of passage - after you've made some money, you don't just retire, you spend your time funding other companies.

"There's a very strong element of excitement, of being able to share what you've learned with the next generation."
'A counterculture vision'

Possibly Mr Tesler's most famous innovation, the cut and paste command, was reportedly based on the old method of editing in which people would physically cut portions of printed text and glue them elsewhere.

The command was incorporated in Apple's software on the Lisa computer in 1983, and the original Macintosh that was released the following year.

One of Mr Tesler's firmest beliefs was that computer systems should stop using "modes", which were common in software design at the time.

Modes allow users to switch between functions on software and apps but make computers both time-consuming and complicated.

So strong was this belief that Mr Tesler's website was called "nomodes.com", his Twitter handle was "@nomodes", and even his car's registration plate was "No Modes".

Silicon Valley's Computer History Museum said Mr Tesler "combined computer science training with a counterculture vision that computers should be for everyone".

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-51567695

_________________
Image


Last edited by Mr_Green_Genes on Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:45 pm
Posts: 6487
Location: Québec country (let me dream...)
There hasn't been a day since I started using a PC that I didn't use the copy/cut/paste.
This guy is an unsung hero as far as I'm concerned !
:smoke:

_________________
No doubt, we're doomed ! For a real diplomacy: abolish Electoral College
Ignore list: DiscoBoy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
I used copy paste to bring you these news... RIP

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 4:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 5:48 pm
Posts: 35861
Location: Somewhere in time
I can cut and paste but not copy and paste my dog ate that part of the manual... :mrgreen:

All kidding aside these guys changed the world, I remember a film back in the 90's called "The Pirates of Silicon Valley" which was good at the time laying out the vision of the different innovators who boot strapped there companies together and found innovations in trash cans of larger companies who did not have the vision to realize there value (the mouse is one) or they bought operating system or programming from inventors who had no idea of their value even though they created them...these people invented the future and effected like the first cave men that built fire, and I do not believe that is over stating the point.

RIP Larry Tesler you made my life easier... :idea:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 4:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
Jon Christensen

Jon Ivar Christensen (20 March 1943 – 18 February 2020) was a Norwegian jazz drummer. He was married to actress, minister, and theater director Ellen Horn, and was the father of singer and actress Emilie Stoesen Christensen.

Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2020 12:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
Image
Coffin-Joe, Zé do Caixão, Brazilian legendary cheap horror filmaker, 83...


I must rectify that his real name was José Mujica Marins, and Coffin Joe was his main character. It is said that the Ramones Robbie Zombie and many directors were great fans:

Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 10:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 12:52 pm
Posts: 19425
Location: LumberTruckWest
Plook wrote:
It's with great sadness and a heavy heart I must inform you the KUIII (Dean) passed away yesterday Sunday 02/09/20 after his long battle with cancer, he missed the DZ show in Arcata last night, I know he was looking forward to it.

His sister say's with a heavy heart it is a blessing due to his suffering recently when his health diminished suddenly over several weeks.

He beat the odds for having Pancreatic Cancer by making it well past the 2% survival rate, that's because Dean had one of the best outlooks on life and was an athlete his whole life. While he liked to have a good time, he was in excellent condition and took care of himself.

He is with with Terri, Kapt. Kiiirk, Pop Jim, and all the good people we lost at the big Frank Zappa Show in the sky siting together on a maroon sofa with a bit of wood flooring under it.

You are missed Dean (KUIII), you are missed...


Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


So sad to hear of Dean's passing. :cry:

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:15 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 2742
Location: Oregon
Daredevil ‘Mad Mike’ Hughes killed in rocket crash

Image
A 2017 photo shows daredevil “Mad Mike” Hughes with his steam-powered rocket constructed out of salvage parts.
(Waldo Stakes / Associated Press)


https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-02-22/daredevil-mad-mike-hughes-killed-in-stunt

By David ZahniserStaff Writer
Feb. 23, 2020
9:38 AM

Mike Hughes, the self-made engineer who billed himself as the “world’s greatest daredevil,” was killed Saturday outside Barstow during a launch of a homemade rocket gone wrong, his publicist confirmed.

Hughes, who went by the nickname “Mad Mike,” was captured on video as he rode a rocket into the sky, failed to activate a parachute and then plummeted to his death, said Darren Shuster, his public relations representative.

The daredevil had been hoping to use Saturday’s launch to reach a height of 5,000 feet, according to a post on Space.com. Instead, dozens of people watched in horror as he fell to earth, said Justin Chapman, a freelance writer who told The Times that he attended the launch.

“Everyone was stunned. They didn’t know what to do,” said Chapman, who had been working on a profile of Hughes. “He landed about a half a mile away from the launch pad.”

An official with the San Bernardino County coroner’s office said she expected there would be a “lengthy” investigation into the incident. “We have no facts at this point,” she said.

Saturday’s launch was supposed to be featured in “Homemade Astronauts,” a series on the Science Channel, according to Discovery.com. The series followed people looking to “explore the final frontier on limited budgets,” the company said.

Chapman said he believes the daredevil had been knocked unconscious during the launch, which took place in the desert south of Barstow, off Highway 247. “The parachute ripped off at launch,” he said. “So the rocket went straight up in an arc and came straight down.”

None of Hughes’ backup parachutes activated, either, Chapman said.

Hughes, 64, had been performing stunts for decades, making long-distance jumps in a limousine and, in more recent years, riding in his own homemade rockets. In 2018, his rocket soared nearly 1,900 feet into the air, landing in the Mojave Desert.

Before that launch, Hughes told the Associated Press that he believed Earth is flat — or, in his words, “shaped like a Frisbee” — and that he wanted to fly into space to make sure.

Shuster, who did not attend Saturday’s launch, said the flat Earth argument helped drum up publicity and sponsors for Hughes, who made his rockets at his home in Apple Valley.

“I don’t think he believed it,” Shuster said. “He did have some governmental conspiracy theories. But don’t confuse it with that flat Earth thing. That was a PR stunt we dreamed up.”

Other sponsors, such as a New Zealand dating app, later signed on to promote Hughes’ adventures, Shuster said.

Eric Sherwin, spokesman for the San Bernardino County Fire Department, said his agency had neither been alerted in advance that Saturday’s rocket launch was going to take place nor informed of the fatality after it had occurred.

Fire Department officials will look into why they were not told of the crash, Sherwin said. A private company, Desert Ambulance, was on the scene at the time, he added.

“They said they did have a fatality,” Sherwin said. “They pronounced a single person deceased at 1:45 this afternoon.”

Hughes’s DIY rocket-making ventures drew widespread attention, attracting the interest of documentary filmmakers and reality TV producers. His supporters donated money so that their names would appear on his rockets, Shuster said. “He was this generation’s Evel Knievel,” the publicist said, referring to the late daredevil motorcyclist and showman.

“This guy knew he wasn’t going to live till 80. I spent a lot of hours with him,” Shuster added. “He had something in him that compelled himself to push himself further each time.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 4:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 6:54 pm
Posts: 8855
Location: The Thumb
^^saw that incident on the evening news. Grim seeing his parachute being torn away from the rocket on launch and him likely not realizing it.

_________________
*********************************************************************
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 9:02 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:18 pm
Posts: 7234
Location: Over there! (last)
Mr. Nice Guy wrote:
Kirk Douglas, acclaimed actor, dead at 103

Image

Kirk Douglas, one of the great Hollywood leading men whose off-screen life was nearly as colorful as his on-screen exploits, has died, according to his son, actor Michael Douglas. He was 103.

Filmography :arrow: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000018/
Jean-Michel Renault
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 10:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
Katherine Johnson

Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson (August 26, 1918 – February 24, 2020) was an American mathematician whose calculations of orbital mechanics as a NASA employee were critical to the success of the first and subsequent U.S. crewed spaceflights.

Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:45 pm
Posts: 6487
Location: Québec country (let me dream...)
About Mike Hughes, the guy who believed the Earth is flat, in the newpaper today here:
"One less vote for Trump, yeah !"
:mrgreen:

_________________
No doubt, we're doomed ! For a real diplomacy: abolish Electoral College
Ignore list: DiscoBoy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
I did post it on the Moron thread, but not with a light heart... RIP, stupid or not. One has to respect courage.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 1:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:45 pm
Posts: 6487
Location: Québec country (let me dream...)
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
I did post it on the Moron thread, but not with a light heart... RIP, stupid or not. One has to respect courage.

Yeah, even stupids can be courageous sometime
8)

_________________
No doubt, we're doomed ! For a real diplomacy: abolish Electoral College
Ignore list: DiscoBoy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 5:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2003 2:41 pm
Posts: 16767
Mij wrote:
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
I did post it on the Moron thread, but not with a light heart... RIP, stupid or not. One has to respect courage.

Yeah, even stupids can be courageous sometime
8)


So you've been courageous at one time or another, eh Mij?

:mrgreen: :lol: :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 5:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2002 7:45 pm
Posts: 6487
Location: Québec country (let me dream...)
Not in front of a syringe !
:P

I was not a candidate to be a Junkie, that's for sure !!!

_________________
No doubt, we're doomed ! For a real diplomacy: abolish Electoral College
Ignore list: DiscoBoy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2020 4:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:18 pm
Posts: 7234
Location: Over there! (last)
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
Katherine Johnson

Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson (August 26, 1918 – February 24, 2020) was an American mathematician whose calculations of orbital mechanics as a NASA employee were critical to the success of the first and subsequent U.S. crewed spaceflights.

Image
Steve Breen
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 7:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 6:54 pm
Posts: 8855
Location: The Thumb
Image

David Roback, guitarist and co-founder of Mazzy Star, dead at 61

Cool band...I'm having sweet 90's flashbacks for the rest of this week!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImKY6TZEyrI

_________________
*********************************************************************
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 7:24 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 2742
Location: Oregon
Jens Nygaard Knudsen, designer of Lego minifigure, dies at 78

Image

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/jens-nygaard-knudsen-designer-of-lego-minifigure-dies-at-78/2020/02/25/95d885f8-573e-11ea-9b35-def5a027d470_story.html

By
Emily Langer
Feb. 25, 2020 at 4:03 p.m. PST

Their numbers have reached 7.8 billion if not more, roughly the population of the Earth. Their ranks include police officers and firefighters, pirates and knights, astronauts and elephant keepers.

Their physical dexterity is limited, their facial features rather plain. But for more than 40 years, standing only four Lego blocks tall, they have been giants of the toy world and the object of untold hours of enjoyment for generations of children and collectors.

They are Lego minifigures, and their creator, the Danish Lego designer Jens Nygaard Knudsen, has died at 78. The Lego Group announced his death, describing him in a statement as “a true visionary whose ideas brought joy and inspiration to millions of builders around the world.”

The Lego company was founded in 1932 by Ole Kirk Kristiansen, a master carpenter, in the central Danish town of Billund, where he made stepladders, ironing boards, stools and wooden toys. It was christened Lego two years later, according to a company history — a name that combined the Danish words “leg godt,” meaning “play well.”

Over the decades, the company honed modern techniques of manufacturing plastic toys, patenting its signature stud-and-tube locking system for its toy building bricks in 1958. But until Mr. Knudsen’s innovations in the 1970s, Lego lacked a human or even humanoid element to enliven its playscapes.

“There was something missing from the houses, cars, planes and fantasy world these children spent hours playing with,” Sarah Herman wrote in her book “A Million Little Bricks: The Unofficial Illustrated History of the LEGO Phenomenon.” Mr. Knudsen’s minifigures, she wrote, went “on to define and drive” the Lego system “more than any other part since the launch of the new Lego brick in 1958.”

In 1974, the company introduced human figures best remembered for their appearance in the popular “Family” set, which included a mother and a father, a grandmother and two children, all with round yellow heads. The characters proved popular with young Lego enthusiasts but were too large to be comfortably employed in the small-scale Lego world.

Mr. Knudsen, who had joined Lego in 1968 and ultimately became the company’s chief designer, was tasked with overseeing the development of a new line of miniature figures. The project took him and the company through dozens of iterations, including the faceless “Extra,” which had stiff arms and no means of ambulation.

It was a start, but Mr. Knudsen wanted a character with greater capacity for play. Introduced in 1978, the blocky minifigure had movable arms and legs, C-shaped hands to grip other Lego elements, and basic if sometimes inscrutable facial features.

With its head made from yellow plastic, the minifigure had “no obvious ethnicity,” according to the company’s description. (Future characters featured natural skin tones.) Minifigures were people in the most rudimentary form, allowing seemingly infinite possibilities for children to imagine the lives behind them.

“As a child, when you’re creating and building an imaginative world from Lego, being able to play with real people in that world is part of the pleasure and fascination and gives character and life to whatever you’ve created,” Herman said in an interview. “They have so much spirit.”

Early minifigures included a police officer, a firefighter, a doctor, a gas station attendant, a knight and an astronaut. The line proved so popular that it grew over the years to include 8,000 characters, among them figures from the Star Wars and Harry Potter franchises. Lego-loving children who grow into Lego-loving adults have been known to place bride-and-groom minifigures atop wedding cakes.

Mr. Knudsen also was credited with designing Lego sets including the “Castle” theme, which Herman described as “one of the first to take LEGO building to another time period.”

“The addition of these knights and guards,” she observed, “with their helmets, horses, and weaponry, transported the castle model from historical relic to a living, breathing battlement.”

Other sets that Mr. Knudsen helped design included the “Space” theme, introduced in 1978 — an undertaking Mr. Knudsen said sapped him of 14 months of work hours in a single year. Another popular set was the “Pirates” theme, which required a new look for the minifigures previously known for their anodyne expressions.

“It was necessary to alter the minifigure’s expression in order to develop credible pirates,” Mr. Knudsen said, according to the company. “A real pirate captain must have a patch on his eye, a peg leg and a hook!”

Little information was available about Mr. Knudsen’s early life. He designed cars, fire stations and a police heliport for Lego, according to Herman’s book, before his work on minifigures. He retired in 2000.

The Lego Group was not able to immediately confirm details of Mr. Knudsen’s death. A colleague, Lego designer Niels Milan Pedersen, told Agence France-Presse that he died Feb. 19 at a hospice center in Hvide Sande, Denmark, and that he had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Survivors, according to the AFP report, include his wife, Marianne Nygaard Knudsen.

Some children who grew up playing with Legos retained such an affection for their toys that they became collectors. Many more became parents of children who delighted in the stubby bricks and minifigures, leaving a trail of them across the house, with others still to turn up under car seats and in coat pockets.

“I am convinced,” Mr. Knudsen told Herman, “that the minifigure will live as long as children play with Lego.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2020 3:16 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 36040
Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Clive Cussler, adventure writer and thrill-seeker, has died at 88
HILLEL ITALIE·19:24, Feb 27 2020

Image
RONNIE BRAMHALL/ AP
Author Clive Cussler has died. He is shown here at the wheel of a classic car in 2007.

Clive Cussler, the million-selling adventure writer and real-life thrill-seeker who wove personal details and spectacular fantasies into his page-turning novels about underwater explorer Dirk Pitt, has died.

Cussler died Monday at his home in Scottsdale, Arizona, said Alexis Welby, spokeswoman for publisher Penguin Random House. He was 88. The American's cause of death was not disclosed.

The author dispatched Pitt and pal Al Giordino on exotic missions highlighted by shipwrecks, treachery, espionage and beautiful women, in popular works including Cyclops, Night Probe! and his commercial breakthrough Raise the Titanic!

Cussler was an Illinois native who was raised in Southern California and lived in Arizona for most of his final years, but he sent Pitt around the globe in plots that ranged from the bold to the incredible.

The Treasure features an aspiring Aztec despot who murders an American envoy, the hijacking of a plane carrying the United Nations secretary-general and soldiers from ancient Rome looting the Library of Alexandria.

In Iceberg, the presidents of French Guiana and the Dominican Republic are the ones in danger, during a visit to Disneyland. In Sahara, a race across the desert somehow leads to new information about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

"Again and again, Dirk Pitt, working for the fictional National Underwater and Marine Agency, must find a sunken vessel and retrieve some artifact," Mark Schone, summarising Cussler's novels, wrote in The New York Times in 2004.

"Evil forces, be they Commies or Blofeldian madmen, try to stop him. Along the way Pitt saves himself, the world and the damsel of the moment."

Cussler has a new novel, Journey of the Pharaohs, set to be released March 10, with several more awaiting posthumous publication.

In real life, Cussler founded his own National Underwater and Marine Agency and participated in dozens of searches for old ships, including one that turned up a steamship belonging to Cornelius Vanderbilt. He also had a long history of questionable claims - some admitted, some denied.

"He can definitely spin the tall tales and is a master of fiction. But that doesn't mean I buy into his alleged discovery claims," Dr. E. Lee Spence wrote on his blog in 2011. Spence, a prominent underwater archaeologist feuded with Cussler over which of them recovered a Confederate submarine.

Born an only child in 1931 in Aurora, Illinois, and raised in Alhambra, California, Cussler's name and writing persona have the air of a pseudonym, but he was born with his moniker, named for the British actor Clive Brook.

He studied for two years at Pasadena City College before enlisting in the Air Force and serving as a mechanic and flight engineer during the Korean War.

In 1955, he married Barbara Knight, with whom he had three children. Through much of the 1960s, he worked in advertising, as a copywriter and creative director. Among the better known slogans he helped coin - "It's stronger than dirt," for an Ajax laundry detergent campaign.

In his free time, he was writing fiction and moonlighting at a skin-diving equipment shop, where his wife suggested he work to help gather material for his novels.

"When creating advertising, I had always looked at the competition and wondered what I could conceive that was totally different,'' Cussler said in an interview included in Dirk Pitt Revealed, a nonfiction book released in 1998.

"(James) Bond was becoming incredibly popular through the movies, and I knew I couldn't match Ian Fleming's style and prose. So I was determined not to write about a detective, secret agent or undercover investigator or deal in murder mysteries. My hero's adventures would be based on and under water."

Cussler finished manuscripts for Mediterranean Caper and Iceberg, but had no literary agent: so he created one. He purchased a thousand sheets of blank letter paper, got a friend in advertising to design a logo for The Charles Winthrop Agency and sent his first inquiry to Peter Lampack of the William Morris Agency. Lampack agreed to take on Cussler and remained with him long after the author confessed his charade.

"I told him the story of Charlie Winthrop with great trepidation," Cussler explained to the Arizona Republic.

"I sat there waiting for the result, and he sat there blank for a minute, and then he laughed himself under the table. And he said, 'Oh my God. I always thought Charlie Winthrop was some guy I met while I was drunk at a cocktail party.'"

Mediterranean Caper came out in 1973, followed by Iceberg two years later and Raise the Titanic! in 1976. He would turn out more than 20 Dirk Pitt novels and expand into children's books and such adventure series as The Oregon Files and The Numa Files.

Cussler had claimed his worldwide sales topped 100 million copies, but in a legal battle with Crusader Entertainment, which alleged he had misrepresented his popularity, it was determined the number was closer to 40 million. In 2007, a Los Angeles jury awarded Crusader US$5 million but also ordered that Cussler receive US$8.5m because the film company only adapted one of the two books it had agreed to produce. The film version of Sahara came out in 2005 and starred Matthew McConaughey and Penelope Cruz.

In recent years, Cussler began working with co-authors and collaborated with his son on Poseidon's Arrow, Crescent Dawn and Arctic Drift. Cussler's son is Dirk Cussler. Pitt himself had a son, called, of course, Dirk Pitt Jr.

In addition to Dirk Cussler, the author is survived by his second wife, Janet, daughters Teri and Dayna, four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.


AP

_________________
hey punk I didn't know you were a Doctor


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 12:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 17691
Location: City Of Tiny Lites
Freeman Dyson, 96
A genuine giant genius of Physics

Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 29, 2020 8:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 2742
Location: Oregon
Joe Coulombe, Who Founded Trader Joe’s, Dies at 89

“Equal parts gourmet shop, discount warehouse and Tiki trading post,” his stores caught on in Southern California and, eventually, beyond.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/29/business/joe-coulombe-dead.html

Image
Joseph Coulombe, at home in Los Angeles in 2011, said he aimed Trader Joe’s at the “overeducated and underpaid.”Credit...Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times, via Contour by Getty Images

By Neil Genzlinger

Feb. 29, 2020
Updated 9:52 a.m. ET

Joseph Coulombe, who in 1967 parsed a few cultural trends, added his retail instincts and created Trader Joe’s, the popular grocery chain known for unusual foods, a generous wine selection and a laid-back atmosphere, died on Friday at his home in Pasadena, Calif. He was 89.

The death was confirmed by his son, Joseph.

In the mid-1960s Mr. Coulombe (pronounced coo-LOAM) owned a modest chain of convenience stores in the Los Angeles area, Pronto Markets, but began to realize he couldn’t compete with better-financed convenience chains like 7-Eleven.

He had noted that education levels in the United States were increasing and that Boeing was planning a new plane, the 747, that he thought would mean more international travel and thus more interest among Americans in exotic foods. He also read somewhere that the more education people had, the more alcohol they drank.

He fashioned those and other tidbits into Trader Joe’s, opening the first store in Pasadena, Calif. He gave it a South Seas motif, had employees wear tropical shirts and be extra friendly, and included exotic cheeses and foods from afar among the stock for the adventurous palate.

“I had no choice,” Mr. Coulombe told Supermarket News in 2002. “I had to do something different.”

Soon he was emphasizing natural foods, organic foods and other “green” trends and had launched Trader Joe’s own label for numerous products, many of them at low prices.

He envisioned the stores as being “for overeducated and underpaid people, for all the classical musicians, museum curators, journalists,” as he put it in an interview with The Los Angeles Times in 2011.

Image
Mr. Coulombe opened his first Trader Joe’s store in Pasadena, Calif.Credit...J. Emilio Flores for The New York Times

The founding sensibility remained as the chain grew. By the time Mr. Coulombe retired in 1988 (having sold his interest to the German company Aldi Nord in 1979 but having remained at the helm), there were either 19 or, by some accounts, 27 stores in Southern California.

His successor as chief executive, John V. Shields Jr., took the chain national. When the first Trader Joe’s opened in New York City in 2006, it was the 253rd. Today, according to the company’s website, there are more than 500.

The chain’s distinctive spot in the grocery landscape is evident from the way Mr. Coulombe’s creation has been described over the years.

“He grafted the gourmet store onto the convenience store onto the health food store onto the liquor store,” Los Angeles Magazine said in 2011.

“Equal parts gourmet shop, discount warehouse and Tiki trading post,” The New York Times said in 2014.

And Fortune magazine, in 2010, described Trader Joe’s as “an offbeat, fun discovery zone that elevates food shopping from a chore to a cultural experience.”

Whatever the description, for Mr. Coulombe the key was keeping the focus on the target group he originally envisioned, those “overeducated, underpaid” consumers eager for healthy products at a good price.

“What you want is a coherent group of customers,” he told Investor’s Business Daily in 1998, “and you shape yourself around it.”

Joseph Hardin Coulombe was born on June 3, 1930, in San Diego. His father, also named Joseph, was an engineer at Convair, an aircraft manufacturer, and his mother, Carmelita (Hardin) Coulombe, was a teacher. Although he would make his mark with stores known for interesting, healthy foods, the cuisine of his childhood, he told Los Angeles Magazine, was dominated by New England boiled dinners, a legacy of his paternal grandmother, and bacon-fat-heavy “Southern suicide cuisine” from his mother’s side of the family.

Mr. Coulombe graduated from San Diego High School in 1947 and earned a bachelor’s degree in economics at Stanford. He also served a year in the Air Force.

After earning a master’s degree at Stanford in 1954, he went to work for the drugstore chain Rexall, which set him to the task of developing a chain of convenience stores. His preparation for that included driving his family around the various neighborhoods of Los Angeles, studying the demographics and possible locations. His son recalled learning to count by counting parking spaces at potential sites.

He had six Pronto Markets up and running when Rexall changed directions and told him to liquidate them; instead he borrowed money and bought them himself, leaving Rexall. He had grown the chain to 18 stores when 7-Eleven set its sights on the Los Angeles market.

Image
Mr. Coulombe, in an undated photo. He told The New York Times in 1987 that he “must sample 4,000 wines a year.”Credit...Esme Gibson

“They were so huge, I decided I’d better get the hell out of convenience-store retailing,” he told The San Diego Union-Tribune in 1987.

Mr. Coulombe prided himself on paying his employees well and on an ever-changing display, one of the things that set him apart from supermarkets.

“We deliberately pursued a policy of discontinuity, as opposed to, say, Coca-Cola, which is in infinite supply,” he told The Los Angeles Times in 2011. “For example, we had the only vintage-dated, field-specific canned corn in existence, and it was the best damned canned corn there was. But there was only so much produced every year, and when you’re out, you’re out.”

In addition to his son, Mr. Coulombe is survived by his wife, Alice (Steere) Coulombe, whom he met when both were students at Stanford and married in 1952; two daughters, Charlotte Schoenmann and Madeleine Coulombe; and six grandchildren.

Another point of pride for Mr. Coulombe was that someone taste-tested what he sold. Sometimes it was a staff member. Often it was Mr. Coulombe himself.

“I must sample about 4,000 wines a year,” he told The New York Times in 1987. “Of course, we don’t buy them all.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 29, 2020 12:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:18 pm
Posts: 7234
Location: Over there! (last)
I shop there at least once a week.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7430 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group