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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 12:00 am 
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP Has No Shame
PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 12:13 am 
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Global report: Donald Trump calls 200,000 US coronavirus deaths
'a shame'

Helen Sullivan 28 minutes ago

President Donald Trump has said the 200,000 US deaths from coronavirus were “a shame” in response to a reporter’s question about the milestone in the country’s fight against the pandemic.

As Trump was departing for an election campaign event in Pittsburgh he told the media: “I think if we didn’t do it properly and do it right, you’d have 2.5 million deaths.”

The US has the most Covid-19 deaths in the world, 60,000 deaths more than Brazil, which has the next worst toll. The total US figure on Tuesday night was 200,768. The administration has been criticised for not acting faster and more firmly to stop the virus’ spread. The US accounts for nearly 6.9 million of the world’s 31.4 million cases. There are fears that the coming winter in the US will cause the virus to spread more rapidly as people are driven indoors.

Trump also blamed China, where the virus emerged late last year, saying the country should have “stopped it at the border” and went on to say: “China let this happen, and just remember that.” The total number of confirmed Covid-19 cases for mainland China stands at 85,307, while the death toll remained unchanged at 4,634.

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Photograph: Win McNamee/Getty Images © Provided by The Guardian
Chris Duncan photographs a Covid-19 memorial installation of 20,000 American flags in Washington.
His 75-year-old mother, Constance, died from coronavirus on her birthday.

In a video address on Tuesday at the United Nations general assembly, Trump said the UN had to take action against China and called for Beijing to be held accountable by the UN for “releasing the virus”. He also falsely claimed the World Health Organization was “virtually controlled by China”. China’s UN representative, Zhang Jun, said the country rejected the “baseless accusations” before introducing President Xi Jinping.

Meanwhile, Japan is considering allowing more foreign arrivals into the country for longer stays starting as early as next month, while keeping the Covid-19 entry curbs in place for tourists, the Asahi newspaper reported on Wednesday.

In an effort to prevent the spread of the virus, Japan has adopted some of the strictest travel restrictions in the world, with even permanent residents unable to re-enter the country without prior permission.

The government eased some of those restrictions on students and businesspeople from seven countries in late July.

Under the latest proposal, Japan would allow those staying longer than three months, such as students and medical workers, to enter from any country, the Asahi reported, citing multiple government sources. Entry would be limited to 1,000 people a day, it said.

Japan has so far managed to keep infections and deaths at relatively low levels, with a cumulative 79,900 infections and 1,519 deaths.

Other developments include:
In Scotland, hundreds of students have been told to isolate after a suspected Covid-19 outbreak in a hall of residence. NHS Tayside is investigating a single positive Covid case and a small number of suspected cases linked to private student accommodation Parker House in Dundee.

The weekly number of new recorded infections worldwide was last week at its highest level ever, the WHO announced. With a new seven-day high of just short of 2 million new cases recorded, the latest tally represents a 6% increase on the previous week as well as “the highest number of reported cases in a single week since the beginning of the epidemic”, the UN health agency said.

In the UK, the prime minister, Boris Johnson, introduced new restrictions for England that could last six months following a surge in cases in recent weeks. The raft of new measures include telling the public to continue working from home, a 10pm curfew for hospitality venues, and limiting weddings to 15 people.

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/world/gl ... id=BHEA000

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 12:39 am 
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Trump’s Wildest Coronavirus Claim Yet Gets Instant Fact-Check
Ed Mazza 3 hours ago

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(AP Photo/Tony Dejak) © ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally on Monday September the 21st, 2020, in Swanton, Ohio.

President Donald Trump attempted to downplay the coronavirus pandemic by saying it affects “elderly people with heart problems and other problems.”

“That’s what it really affects,” Trump said during a campaign rally in Ohio on Monday. “That’s it.”

Trump also falsely claimed the virus doesn’t really affect anyone below the age of 18.

“In some states, thousands of people, nobody young... they have a strong immune system, who knows,” he said. “But it affects virtually nobody. It’s an amazing thing.”

"It affects virtually nobody," Trump says of the coronavirus, which has now killed 200,000 Americans and counting pic.twitter.com/qHrZvUWNhX
— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) September 22, 2020

According to official US figures, some 400,000 people under the age of 18 have been infected with the coronavirus. While many cases were mild or even without symptoms, at least 576 patients under the age of 18 were hospitalised for the infection between March and July.

More than 200,000 people in the US have died in the pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The president’s comments also contradicted his own past statements.

“It’s turning out it’s not just old people,” Trump told journalist Bob Woodward in March in comments that were only recently made public. “Just today and yesterday, some startling facts came out. It’s not just old – older. Young people, too. Plenty of young people.”

In public, however, Trump has continued to spend much of the pandemic trying to downplay the virus. In February, he predicted the number of cases “within a couple of days” would be “down to close to zero.” More recently, Trump has tried to dismiss cases in “blue” states.

“The blue states had tremendous death rates,” Trump said last week. “If you take the blue states out, we’re at a level that I don’t think anybody in the world would be at, we’re really at a very low level.”

Joe Biden, former vice president and Trump’s opponent in the US election, took the opposite approach when asked about the climbing death toll, warning against becoming numb to the news.

“We can’t lose the ability to feel the sorrow and the loss and the anger for so many lives lost,” Biden said in Wisconsin on Monday. “We can’t let the numbers become statistics, a background noise, just a blur that we see on the nightly news.”

Biden said the Covid-19 deaths weren’t just numbers but “empty chairs at dining room tables and kitchen tables that weeks and months ago were filled with a loved one, a mom, a dad, a brother, a sister.”

On social media, Trump’s critics zeroed in on his use of the phrase “virtually nobody” as both callous and inaccurate:

They should turn this into a 30 second spot and run it in retirement communities. https://t.co/C5gVngsjfG
— Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) September 22, 2020

Trump to Bob Woodward in March: “Just today and yesterday, some startling facts came out. It’s not just old, older. Young people too, plenty of young people."

Trump today: "It affects virtually nobody...old people..that's it."pic.twitter.com/COVlyvMGAA#TrumpLied200KAmericansdied
— Holly Figueroa O'Reilly (@AynRandPaulRyan) September 22, 2020

Today Trump said covid, “Affects virtually nobody.”

In fact, there have only been 3 events with more deaths than covid in ALL OF US HISTORY. https://t.co/2ZBWK5KZRO
— Mikel Jollett (@Mikel_Jollett) September 22, 2020

Trump's point here is even more cruel than it seems: those who are lost to COVID are just "nobodies" to him -- the same way that soldiers lost in battle are "suckers" and "losers." https://t.co/EAdr9Qf4bV
— Ronald Klain (@RonaldKlain) September 22, 2020

How does Trump shrugging off old people dying by the thousands play at The Villages in Florida?
— Schooley (@Rschooley) September 22, 2020

if you take away the blue states, the old, the nonwhite and all the others who died, it affects virtually nobody
— Farhad Manjoo (@fmanjoo) September 22, 2020

Hey newsflash from trump, a guy I trust for all my medical information! (He is an expert in all topics) Corona doesn’t really affect the young, like if you’re under 18 you’re good, soooo it affects virtually nobody! Phew! https://t.co/XivyocRKf9
— Rachel Dratch (@TheRealDratch) September 22, 2020

“It affects virtually nobody. It’s an amazing thing.”

“By the way, open your schools.”

A reminder that we have NO comprehensive plan to confront a pandemic that has killed 200K Americans. pic.twitter.com/uqlS6ZK4VF
— Kristen Clarke 866-OUR-VOTE (@KristenClarkeJD) September 22, 2020

Just play Trump's actual quotes over shots of a funeral:

"I don't take responsibility at all."

"It is what it is."

"It affects virtually nobody." https://t.co/lwC8hVKPNF
— Frank Lesser (@sadmonsters) September 22, 2020

Evil https://t.co/CObHSTf2rq
— kristen johnston (@thekjohnston) September 22, 2020

Know someone who died from coronavirus? Trump considers them "virtually nobody." https://t.co/sDS0tybyy2
— Tim Hogan (@timjhogan) September 22, 2020

"Virtually nobody" = 200,000 people.

I'm starting to understand how he bankrupted the casinos.
— Josh Moon (@Josh_Moon) September 22, 2020

If you, or a family member, or a friend got sick or died of #COVID19, to Trump you are "virtually nobody." https://t.co/wuZCnvN9oD
— Peter Gleick (@PeterGleick) September 22, 2020

"It affects virtually nobody" except it affected nearly 7 millions of Americans (that we know of) & 31M worldwide, and killed 200K Americans (963K dead worldwide), but sure, keep telling your BS to your gullible base who trust a 2nd grade reality tv show guy over facts & science. https://t.co/3bZIJ9iUn7
— Francesco Francavilla (@f_francavilla) September 22, 2020

200,000 dead Americans

6.9 million infected

Families shattered

Millions thrown out of work

Trump tonight: "It (coronavirus) effects (virtually) nobody..."
— West Wing Reports (@WestWingReport) September 22, 2020

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/uknews/t ... id=BHEA000

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2020 7:16 am 
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US rescinded prize to Finnish journalist for tweeting on Trump: watchdog
AFP 1 hour ago

The State Department rescinded an award for a Finnish journalist who reported on Russian disinformation after spotting her social media postings critical of President Donald Trump, an internal review said Friday.

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© Brendan Smialowski
US President Donald Trump (left) and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands ahead a meeting in Helsinki, which was the center of tweets by a Finnish journalist that led the State Department to rescind an award for her, according to an internal report

The State Department's inspector general found that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had agreed to give the International Women of Courage award, to be presented in March 2019 for International Women's Day, to journalist Jessikka Aro.

A cable from the US embassy in Helsinki had nominated her, pointing to her work exposing "disinformation campaigns perpetuated by Russia's social media propaganda machine" for which she received death threats.

After she was notified of the award but before the ceremony, the State Department "discovered social media posts by Ms. Aro that were critical of the president," the inspector general's report said.

At that point, the State Department "decided to rescind the award to Ms. Aro," it said.

The inspector general did not find any legal wrongdoing, saying the selection of award recipients was purely within the discretion of the State Department.

But the report said that the State Department inaccurately denied to reporters and Congress that her social media posts were the issue, falsely contending that she had been erroneously informed she was receiving the award.

Robert Menendez, one of a number of Democratic senators who had requested the investigation, said that Pompeo "should have honored a courageous journalist willing to stand up to Kremlin propaganda."

"Instead, his department sought to stifle dissent to avoid upsetting a president who, day after day, tries to take pages out of Putin's playbook," said Menendez, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

"The State Department owes Ms. Aro an apology," he said in a statement.

Among posts pointed out by the report, Aro retweeted a news article about threats to Boston Globe journalists and noted how Trump frequently decries "fake news."

In another tweet, she said that a "Russian troll factory" was organizing pro-Trump protests as he visited Helsinki to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin, and wrote approvingly of protests against both leaders.

Trump faced wide criticism after the 2018 summit for appearing to accept Putin's denials, in contradiction of US intelligence, that Russia did not intervene in the 2016 US election.

sct/st

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/world/us ... id=BHEA000

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2020 11:42 am 
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Trump won't commit to peaceful transfer of power if he loses November election
Aamer Madhani Kevin Freking·17:06, September the 24th, 2020

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Evan Vucci/AP
“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said Wednesday at a news conference, responding to a question about whether he’d commit to a peaceful transfer of power.

US President Donald Trump again declined to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the November 3 presidential election.

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said on Wednesday (local time) at a news conference, responding to a question about whether he’d commit to a peaceful transfer of power. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.”

It is highly unusual that a sitting president would express less than complete confidence in the American democracy’s electoral process. But he also declined four years ago to commit to honouring the election results if his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, won.

His current Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, was asked about Trump’s comment after landing in Wilmington, Delaware, on Wednesday night (NZT Thursday).

What country are we in?” Biden asked incredulously, adding: “I’m being facetious. Look, he says the most irrational things. I don’t know what to say about it. But it doesn’t surprise me.”

Image
Carolyn Kaster/AP
Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden waves as he boards a plane at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in North Carolina.

Trump has been pressing a months long campaign against mail-in voting this November by tweeting and speaking out critically about the practice. More states are encouraging mail-in voting to keep voters safe amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The president, who uses mail-in voting himself, has tried to distinguish between states that automatically send mail ballots to all registered voters and those, like Florida, that send them only to voters who request a mail ballot.

Trump has baselessly claimed widespread mail voting will lead to massive fraud. The five states that routinely send mail ballots to all voters have seen no significant fraud.

Trump on Wednesday appeared to suggest that if states got “rid of” the unsolicited mailing of ballots there would be no concern about fraud or peaceful transfers of power.

“You’ll have a very peaceful – there won’t be a transfer frankly,” Trump said. “There’ll be a continuation. The ballots are out of control, you know it, and you know, who knows it better than anybody else? The Democrats know it better than anybody else.”

In a July interview, Trump similarly refused to commit to accepting the results.

“I have to see. Look ... I have to see,” Trump told Chris Wallace during a wide-ranging July interview on “Fox News Sunday.” “No, I’m not going to just say yes. I’m not going to say no, and I didn’t last time either.”

The Biden campaign responded Wednesday: “The American people will decide this election. And the United States government is perfectly capable of escorting trespassers out of the White House.”

The American Civil Liberties Union also protested Trump's remarks. “The peaceful transfer of power is essential to a functioning democracy,” National Legal Director David Cole said. “This statement from the President of the United States should trouble every American.”

Trump made similar comments ahead of the 2016 election. When asked during an October debate whether he would abide by the voters’ will, Trump responded that he would “keep you in suspense.”

It’s unlikely that any chaos in states with universal mail-in voting will cause the election result to be inaccurately tabulated, as Trump has suggested.

The five states that already have such balloting have had time to ramp up their systems, while four states newly adopting it – California, New Jersey, Nevada and Vermont – have not. Washington, DC, is also newly adopting it.

Of those nine states, only Nevada is a battleground, worth six electoral votes

and likely to be pivotal only in a national presidential deadlock.

California, New Jersey, Vermont and DC are overwhelmingly Democratic and likely to be won by Biden.


AP

https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/ ... r-election

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2020 12:00 pm 
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US lawmakers rebuke Trump's words, vow peaceful power transfer
AAMER MADHANI and KEVIN FREKING·05:51, September the 25th, 2020.

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Evan Vucci/AP
Trump said during a Wednesday (local time) news conference, "We're going to have to see what happens," responding to a question about committing to the results.

US President Donald Trump’s refusal to commit to a peaceful transition of power, should he lose the upcoming election, has drawn rebukes from lawmakers of both main parties, with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reminding him he wasn’t in North Korea.

US Congressional leaders from both Democratic and Republican parties, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, swiftly pushed back after Trump said during a Wednesday (local time) news conference, "We're going to have to see what happens," responding to a question about committing to the results.

"You know that I've been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster."

McConnell and other leaders of Trump's Republican Party had no hesitation in committing to an orderly transfer if Trump loses.

"The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th," McConnell said in a tweet. "There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792."

Democrat Pelosi said it was "very sad" the president of the United States was even raising this question.

"What would our founders think?" she asked.

"Calm down, Mr President," Pelosi said at a news conference.

She reminded Trump the US is not North Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia or other countries with strongman leaders he openly admires.

"You are in the United States of America. It is a democracy," she said. "So why don't you just try for a moment to honour our oath of office to the Constitution of the United States."

Pelosi said she has confidence in American voters to cast their votes and choose the president.

Hardly any Republican lawmakers came to the president's defence.

Senator Lindsey Graham, a Trump ally and chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told Fox & Friends on Thursday: "If Republicans lose we will accept the result. If the Supreme Court rules in favour of Joe Biden, I will accept that result."

Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, a member of the House Republican leadership, tweeted: "The peaceful transfer of power is enshrined in our Constitution and fundamental to the survival of our Republic. America's leaders swear an oath to the Constitution. We will uphold that oath."

Image
Susan Walsh/AP
Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reminded Trump the US is not North Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia or other countries with strongman leaders he openly admires.

Longtime Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama, chairman of the Appropriations Committee said: "Well, we've always had a peaceful transfer of power. That's one of the hallmarks. And I think this year will be no exception."

It is highly unusual that a sitting president would express less than complete confidence in the American democracy's electoral process. But Trump also declined four years ago to commit to honouring the election results if his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, won.

Biden, his current Democratic challenger, was asked about Trump's comment after landing in Wilmington, Delaware, on Wednesday night.

"What country are we in?" Biden asked incredulously, adding: "I'm being facetious. Look, he says the most irrational things. I don't know what to say about it. But it doesn't surprise me."

Trump has been pressing a months-long campaign against mail-in voting this November by tweeting and speaking out critically about the practice. More states are encouraging mail-in voting to keep voters safe during the coronavirus pandemic.

The president, who uses mail-in voting himself, has tried to distinguish between states that automatically send mail ballots to all registered voters and those, like Florida, that send them only to voters who request a mail ballot.

Trump has baselessly claimed widespread mail voting will lead to massive fraud. The five states that routinely send mail ballots to all voters have seen no significant fraud.

Image
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Mitch McConnell and other leaders of Trump's Republican Party had no hesitation in committing to an orderly transfer if Trump loses.

"Regardless of how divided our country is right now, when elections are over and winners are declared, we must all commit ourselves to the Constitution and accept the results," tweeted Representative Steve Stivers, a former chair of the House Republican campaign arm.

Senator Mitt Romney, one of the lone Republican voices to cross Trump, referred to an electoral crisis in Europe, tweeting: "Fundamental to democracy is the peaceful transition of power; without that, there is Belarus. Any suggestion that a president might not respect this Constitutional guarantee is both unthinkable and unacceptable."

But Graham's repeated suggestion on Fox that the Supreme Court could – when acting upon seemingly inevitable legal challenges to the election – end up all but declaring the winner came with an unspoken subtext: that the Senate is moving to confirm a Trump-appointed woman to fill the vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death before the election, potentially stacking the deck for Republicans.

Trump on Wednesday had appeared to suggest that if states got "rid of" the unsolicited mailing of ballots there would be no concern about fraud or peaceful transfers of power.

"You'll have a very peaceful – there won't be a transfer frankly," Trump said. "There'll be a continuation. The ballots are out of control, you know it, and you
know, who knows it better than anybody else? The Democrats know it better than anybody else."

In a July interview, Trump similarly refused to commit to accepting the results.

"I have to see. Look ... I have to see," Trump told Chris Wallace during a July interview on Fox News Sunday. "No, I'm not going to just say yes. I'm not going to say no, and I didn't last time either."

It's unlikely that any chaos in states with universal mail-in voting will cause the election result to be inaccurately tabulated, as Trump has suggested.

Of the nine states, only Nevada is a battleground, worth six electoral votes and likely to be pivotal only in a national presidential deadlock.


AP

https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/ ... r-transfer

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2020 12:56 pm 
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Good grief... Is there a doctor who can cure this asshole ?
:P

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2020 2:37 pm 
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Trump attorney fights to block disclosure of tax returns but judges appear skeptical
Kristine Phillips, USA TODAY 4 hours ago

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© Andrew Harnik, AP
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Xtreme Manufacturing in Henderson, Nevada.

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump's attorney faced a skeptical group of judges Friday as he sought to get thrown out a lower court's decision requiring the disclosure of Trump's tax returns to a Manhattan prosecutor.

William Consovoy, the president's attorney, argued during a hearing before the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that the grand jury subpoena seeking Trump's tax returns was "an overbroad fishing expedition and issued in bad faith" to harass the president.

Judge Pierre Leval said allegations that the subpoena was issued in bad faith were "highly contrived." Judge Robert Katzmann said grand juries have broad authority and wondered whether the president's attorney is asking them to change the way grand juries have always operated. And Judge Raymond Lohier pressed Consovoy on whether there's a version of the subpoena he would not view as too broad.

Trump is seeking to overturn a decision last month by U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero, who rejected the president's latest efforts to block the grand jury subpoena for his tax returns. Marrero's ruling was a major loss for Trump, who has dismissed the Manhattan prosecutor's investigation as a political "witch hunt" and has fought all the way to the Supreme Court to keep his financial records private.

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance is investigating hush money payments allegedly made to two women who claimed to have had affairs with Trump before the 2016 presidential election. Vance's office suggested in court documents last month that prosecutors are also looking broadly at "allegations of possible criminal activity" at the Trump Organization.

Trump's tax returns: Trump investigation goes beyond hush money to alleged mistresses, Manhattan DA suggests

Carey Dunne, Vance's general counsel, said allegations from the president's legal team are based on politics and speculations about the scope of the district attorney's investigation. He added that Vance has never made any public statements about his office's political motivation to target Trump and his business.

"Absent those kinds of facts, to simply say, 'Sometimes prosecutors act with political motivations' ... that's not how it works," Dunne said.

Image
© Frank Franklin II, AP
In this May 10, 2018, file photo, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., responds to a question during a news conference in New York. AP, Frank Franklin II, File)

Consovoy argued that the subpoena was "retaliatory," saying Vance's office simply "photocopied" a congressional subpoena issued by House Democrats who were seeking the same documents. Doing so is "totally unacceptable," Consovoy said.

Consovoy also said the time period and geographic reach covered by the subpoena prove it is overly broad. The subpoena is seeking eight years of Trump's personal and business tax records and covers financial documents outside of New York City.

"If you would've looked at the definition of a fishing expedition, this is it," Consovoy said.

Still, the judges, who were appointed by Democratic presidents, did not seem persuaded.

Leval said he does not think documents spanning several years and covering operations in many places is overly broad, especially for a global company like the Trump Organization.

"When one is investigating the lawfulness and propriety of tax returns of individuals or organizations that operates worldwide, all the worldwide operations are pertinent ... The same is true with respect to years because there's an important linkage ... especially with real estate when depreciation is such an important matter ... on what is reported for certain years and what is reported for prior years," Leval said.

Vance's office has agreed to hold off on enforcing the subpoena until after the appeals court reaches its decision.

In July, the Supreme Court ruled that the president cannot keep his tax returns and financial records from Vance's office, rejecting Trump's claims of absolute immunity from criminal investigations.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Trump attorney fights to block disclosure of tax returns but judges appear skeptical

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/politics ... id=BHEA000

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2020 8:05 am 
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Hey Disco Boy, why did you abanDON the Trump accomplishment list? Lolololololol


Where are the Trump supporting morons when you could use a good laugh at their expense? Losers.


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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2020 8:18 am 
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Sorry to say, SpaceBrother, but Trump is not beaten yet.
Anything can happen in this f**ked country !

Nevertheless, I admit that now is the time for a good laugh at every morons that still support that tragic clown.

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2020 12:49 am 
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 2:52 am 
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If things don't work out in the election, Trump could always try becoming President in the Phillipines - he's already supported them with 200 times more taxes than he paid in the US in 2017.
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 3:22 am 
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The Tedium of Trump
Quinta Jurecic 44 minutes ago

Donald Trump has built his public persona around the central importance of grabbing attention—whether his actions provoke delight or fury.
And yet he is, and has long been, boring.

Image
© Drew Angerer / Getty / The Atlantic

Four years into his presidency, Trump isn’t boring in the way a dull, empty afternoon is boring. Trump is boring in the way that the seventh season of a reality-television show is boring: A lot is happening, but there’s nothing to say about it. The president is a man without depths to plumb. What you see is what you get, and what you get is the same mix of venality, solipsism, and racial hatred that has long been obvious. Trump’s abuses of the presidency are often compared to those of Richard Nixon, but Nixon had a deep, if troubled, interior life; one biographer characterized Nixon as struggling with “tragic flaws,” a description hard to imagine any credible biographer using to describe Trump. In a democracy whose vitality depends, at least in part, on what people are paying attention to and what they think about it, the frenzied monotony of Trump raises the question: What happens when politics is crucially important, but there is little original to say?

The fact that pundits may have a tough time concocting original commentary is not, in itself, the country’s biggest problem. But at its best, the work of people who write and talk and make art about politics is valuable because it helps other members of society make sense of their shared world. If that work loses depth or relevance, democratic culture in the United States diminishes, and people who otherwise would be engaged with politics turn their attention elsewhere.

It’s not that nothing is happening. With Election Day only a month away, Trump has repeatedly refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power and is doing his best to cast doubt on the integrity of the vote, calling mail-in ballots “a whole big scam.” He is now poised to fill his third seat on the Supreme Court following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a victory that would tilt the politics of the Court rightward for a generation. Throughout his presidency, he has arguably committed dozens of impeachable offenses during his time in office, from firing FBI Director James Comey and attempting to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller to promising pardons to Department of Homeland Security officials if they turned away asylum applicants at the border to doling out a commutation to his associate Roger Stone, seemingly as a reward for Stone’s refusal to testify against Trump during the Russia investigation.

But while these scandals are important, they also are in some ways the same story: The president is a greedy racist and misogynist who does not understand his job. “Is it technically news if he’s doing his usual racism?” pondered the Daily Beast reporter Asawin Suebsaeng after Trump let loose a particularly vile screed against Representative Ilhan Omar during a rally this month. Even Trump’s disturbing threat not to concede is a replay of his insistence in October 2016 that he would accept the results of the upcoming election “if I win.”

Read any of the tell-alls written by Trump’s former close associates or family members—not to mention journalists such as Bob Woodward—and you will come away with basically the same understanding. As the journalist Jennifer Szalai wrote in her New York Times review of Woodward’s latest chronicle of the Trump administration, “The Trump that emerges in ‘Rage’ is impetuous and self-aggrandizing—in other words, immediately recognizable to anyone paying even the minimal amount of attention.”

There is something uncanny about this. The English novelist E. M. Forster argued that the difference between a fictional character and a real person is that it is possible to know everything about a character in a novel; real people, however, see one another through a glass, darkly. And yet while it may not be possible to know every hidden detail of Trump’s life, it is trivially easy to understand everything about his personality. If he were a character, Forster would call him flat, unrealistic: He does not, as Forster requires, have the capacity to surprise. At some point over the course of the Trump era, this became a running joke among political commentators, who, every time Trump does something appalling and yet obvious, make cracks on social media about how hackneyed the Trump presidency would seem if it were fiction.

This has created a problem for artists as well. Surveying the landscape of anti-Trump art in February 2019, the cultural critic Jillian Steinhauer argued that the work had failed to hit the mark: It was missing, she wrote, “the critical introspection to accompany the laughter.” But such introspection is hard to achieve when the person prompting it is so lacking in depth or interiority.

Likewise, four years into this presidency uncovering fresh insight into Trump or his administration is difficult. Activists, journalists, and commentators found those insights earlier on. Use of the phrase The cruelty is the point, coined by The Atlantic’s Adam Serwer in 2018, has become widespread in part because it continues to be uncomplicatedly true: A lot of the time, the motivations of Trump and those around him are not actually more involved than a desire to hurt others. The idea is so simple that it’s more or less become a meme, which isn’t to deride its perceptiveness but rather to say that the Trump White House is fundamentally simple. Personally, I wrote a great deal in the first few years of the administration about Trump’s understanding of law as a cudgel against the vulnerable before it dawned on me that I was writing the same article over and over again.

This leaves two main options for those analyzing and writing about politics. One is to shrug and accept that the times may merit writing the same thing over and over again. The country is in the midst of an emergency; what does it matter if the emergency is repetitive? Sometimes yelling loudly enough, and for long enough, can move the relevant political figures to act—as it did in the case of impeachment.

But the danger is that, by yelling, the speaker becomes part of the great roaring Trump media machine, the engine of which is dependent on the indignation of the president’s opponents as much as the president’s own vileness. “There is no such thing as Trump fatigue,” the journalist Sopan Deb said when news of John Bolton’s book broke in January. “There will always be Trump books sucking up oxygen and authors to make money off them.” The same could be said of the fleet of commentary launched by Bolton’s book and all the books like his, Woodward’s among them. Along these lines, the opinion writer Drew Magary announced recently that he was stopping his column out of exhaustion with the “hamster wheel” of political commentary: “I have nothing left to say beyond what I’ve already said.”

That leaves the option of taking a step back from politics and finding intellectual engagement elsewhere. “It may be enough to cultivate your own artistic garden,” Margaret Atwood wrote after Trump’s election, suggesting that artists and writers find their footing in exploring common humanity: “Lives may be deformed by politics—and many certainly have been—but we are not, finally, the sum of our politicians.” Atwood struck a hopeful note, but this instinct can also manifest as something more parochial, a turning inward rather than an effort to expand one’s horizons beyond the events of the day. In 2019, Venkatesh Rao began writing on his blog Ribbonfarm about what he saw as an emerging aesthetic of home goods and fuzzy socks as a refuge from political tempests: “Domestic cozy,” as he called it, is “something of a pre-emptive retreat from worldly affairs for a generation that, quite understandably, thinks the public sphere is falling apart.” The comfort of a weighted blanket can be a shield from political engagement as well as other people.

This has a historical echo with the later years of the Soviet Union. In the 1970s and ’80s, many Soviet citizens—among them young people, writers, and artists, the sorts of people one would expect to be engaged in political life—pulled away from politics, which seemed to them to be a waste of time. They were not dissidents or activists; they just didn’t care. This lack of interest took different forms. In his study of the late Soviet period, Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More, the anthropologist Alexei Yurchak describes some young Soviets forming odd, apolitical artist collectives, while others joined clubs whose members passionately debated more or less everything except current events. “Everyone understood everything, so why speak about that? It was uninteresting,” a former university student told Yurchak dismissively of dissident politics. Likewise, in an exchange with an American sociologist during this period, one Soviet rock musician explained, “We’re interested in universal problems which don’t depend on this or that system, or on a particular time.” His bandmate chimed in: “People are interested in politics, and I don’t know why they are.”

These Soviet musicians might have agreed with Atwood’s suggestion that artists should focus on timeless explorations of what it means to be human. Yurchak also quotes a onetime member of an apolitical literary club remembering the group as an “artificially created microclimate”—which recalls Atwood’s vision of an artistic garden separate from politics, or the Instagrammable comfort of domestic cozy. Writing in The New York Review of Books in 2019, the British writer Viv Groskop wondered whether Westerners overwhelmed by the news might wish to adopt the Soviet tradition of “internal exile” and curl into themselves to find peace away from politics. “It is reasonable,” Groskop wrote, “to conclude that apathy must surely be defensible as some kind of political act.”

Those Soviets who withdrew from politics were responding to the boredom of a public life curtailed by official limitations on what could and couldn’t be said. Today, the boredom of the Trump era is the product of a different kind of censorship, what the journalist Peter Pomerantsev calls “censorship through noise.” Instead of the tedium of silence, this is the tedium of endless clatter. But it has the same effect. Whether you choose not to speak about politics and turn your attention elsewhere, or you decide to say the same thing over and over again, the odds are that political leadership will carry on just as it did before. So why bother at all?

The United States is not yet in the extreme circumstances in which Yurchak’s subjects found themselves. When Atwood suggested in 2017 that artists should tend their own gardens, she was not recommending that they turn away from the news entirely—after all, she’s continued to speak publicly about the Trump presidency and explore political themes in her fiction—but rather that they remember that there are ideas outside politics. If Trump retains power for a second term, though, resisting the pull of apathy may prove more difficult. This pervasive disinterest is a dangerous thing for a democracy, which depends on political engagement among its people in order to survive. And Trump would surely welcome such detachment, which would only make it easier for him to hold on to power.

If Joe Biden wins the election, this problem will likely fade when he is sworn in as president in January 2021. Part of Biden’s pitch to voters is that his administration just won’t suck up as much of their attention: as a Biden campaign ad asked in August, “Remember when you didn’t have to think about the president every single day?” But under a Biden administration, Trump will not go away, and alternative ways of engaging with him—ways that don’t cultivate apathy—are needed for the political and historical reckoning with Trump’s legacy that will need to take place after he leaves office. There is also, of course, the possibility that the current president remains in place for another four years—in which case the battle against apathy becomes even more urgent.

Recently, a handful of writers have begun to suggest such alternatives. “The most essential books about the Trump era are not about Trump at all,” the Washington Post nonfiction critic Carlos Lozada writes in his forthcoming book on the literature of the Trump era, What Were We Thinking. Better, Lozada suggests, to examine the forces that enabled Trump’s rise and continued hold on power. Similarly, Szalai argues in her review of Woodward’s book that “the real story about the Trump era is less about Trump and more about the people who surround and protect him.” Along these lines, Anne Applebaum recently wrote in The Atlantic on the question of why Republican leaders choose to enable Trump’s abuses, and this conversation about responsibility and complicity has continued as former administration officials and staffers seek absolution in publicly supporting Joe Biden.

The world that made Trump possible is deeper, stranger, and more worthy of thought than Trump himself has ever been, and studying it can offer answers and insights about the current American crisis that the president, in his shallowness, can’t. This approach has another advantage, too. It denies Trump the thing he wants most of all: undivided attention.

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/opinion/ ... id=BHEA000

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 6:34 am 
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AND ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD...
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:09 am 
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New York Times: Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/27/politics/trump-income-taxes-new-york-times-report/index.html

By Paul LeBlanc, Lauren Fox and Kara Scannell, CNN
Updated 7:19 AM ET, Mon September 28, 2020

Washington (CNN) Donald Trump paid no federal income taxes whatsoever in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000 because he reported losing significantly more than he made, according to an explosive report released Sunday by the New York Times.

In both the year he won the presidency and his first year in the White House, Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes, the Times reported.

Detailing payments gleaned from more than two decades of tax information, the Times report outlines extensive financial losses and years of tax avoidance that deal a blow to the business-tycoon brand Trump has built his political career on.
At a White House briefing Sunday, Trump denied the New York Times story and claimed that he pays "a lot" in federal income taxes.

"I pay a lot, and I pay a lot in state income taxes," he said.

Trump added that he is willing to release his tax returns once he is no longer under audit by the Internal Revenue Service, which he said "treats me badly." The President, however, is under no obligation to hold his tax returns while under audit, despite his repeated claims otherwise.

Trump also refused to answer how much he has paid in federal taxes in the briefing and walked out to shouted questions from CNN's Jeremy Diamond on the topic.

The expansive Times report paints a picture of a businessman who was struggling to keep his businesses afloat and was reporting millions in losses even as he was campaigning for President and boasting about his financial success.

According to the newspaper, Trump used the $427.4 million he was paid for "The Apprentice" to fund his other businesses, mostly his golf courses, and was putting more cash into his businesses than he was taking out.

The tax information obtained by the Times also reveals Trump has been fighting the IRS for years over whether losses he claimed should have resulted in a nearly $73 million refund.

In response to a letter summarizing the newspaper's findings, Trump Organization lawyer Alan Garten told the Times that "most, if not all, of the facts appear to be inaccurate" and requested the documents.

The New York Times said it will not make Trump's tax-return data public so as not to jeopardize its sources "who have taken enormous personal risks to help inform the public."

The tax-return data obtained by the newspaper does not include his personal returns for 2018 or 2019.

Years of tax avoidance

Trump's taxes have been largely a mystery since he first ran for office.

During the 2016 campaign, the then-candidate broke with presidential election norms and refused to produce his tax returns for public review. They have remained private since he took office.

Being under audit by the IRS does not preclude someone from releasing their tax returns publicly. But that hasn't stopped Trump from using it as a defense against releasing his financial information.

In 2016, Trump released a letter from his tax attorneys that confirmed he was under audit. But the letter also said the IRS finished reviewing Trump's taxes from 2002 through 2008. Trump did not release his tax returns from those years, even though the audits were over.
A previous New York Times investigation published in 2018 reported that Trump had helped "his parents dodge taxes" in the 1990s, including "instances of outright fraud" that allowed him to amass a fortune from them.

Trump received at least $413 million in today's dollars from his father's real estate empire, starting at the age of 3.

New York Times report details

The Times reported Sunday that Trump's tax information reveals specific examples of the potential conflicts of interests between the President's business with his position.

The President has collected an additional $5 million a year at Mar-a-Lago since 2015 from new members. A roofing material manufacturer GAF spent at least $1.5 million in 2018 at Trump's Doral golf course near Miami while its industry was lobbying the government to roll back federal regulations, according to the Times.

It also found that Billy Graham Evangelistic Association paid more than $397,000 to Trump's Washington, DC, hotel in 2017.
The newspaper reported that in Trump's first two years in office, he has collected $73 million in revenue overseas, with much of that coming from his golf courses but some coming from licensing deals in countries, including the Philippines, India and Turkey.
The Times said all of the information obtained was "provided by sources with legal access to it."

Democrats reaffirm push for full tax returns

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, who requested Trump's tax returns in April 2019, said Sunday evening that the Times report reaffirms his commitment to getting those returns.

"Today's report underscores the importance of the Ways and Means Committee's ongoing lawsuit to access Mr. Trump's tax returns and ensure the presidential audit program is functioning effectively, without improper influence," he said.

"I remain confident that the law is on the Committee's side, and that our request meets the standard the Supreme Court set with its July 2020 rulings. Our case is very strong, and we will ultimately prevail."

In the meantime, the report is sure to fuel fresh attacks on the President in the final weeks of the presidential campaign.
Democratic nominee Joe Biden's deputy campaign manager Kate Bedingfield told CNN's Anderson Cooper on "AC360" Sunday that Trump's tax information is "the latest reminder how clear the choice is here in this race between Park Avenue, and Scranton."

"You have in Donald Trump a President who spends his time thinking about how he can work his way out of paying taxes, of meeting the obligation that every other working person in this country meets every year," she said.

"With Joe Biden, you have somebody who has a completely different perspective on what it means to be a working family in this country."
That message was echoed by CNN political commentator and former Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich, who assessed, "there are people out there -- and I know, I come from blue collar, hardworking -- these folks are scrapping to make a living and they're going to wake up and find out this incredible mogul paid $750."

"I don't care what his excuses are," he said. "It doesn't pass the smell test."
This story has been updated with additional reporting.

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:26 am 
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 5:41 am 
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 12:51 pm 
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Hey Pedro ! Let's have a laugh . . .
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Oh, BTW... did you know that Trump's Grandpa died of Spanish Flu ?
Ironic, isn't it ?

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Oh, I read in the newspaper today about his 'big' taxes of 750$. It seems that he deducted 70,000$ for his hair care !
How many Americans earned that much last year alone ? You, Pedro ?

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Humm... more like 210,500 as I'm posting it

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Tonight it's Biden vs Trump. I know no stupid Trump supporters will understand what's going on. American tragedy.
I just hope Biden will do a decent debate.

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2020 7:15 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2020 3:03 am 
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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:26 pm 
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Biden prepared for a debate, Trump prevented it.
But, really, TRUMP CAN'T DO OTHERWISE ! HE HAS NOTHING SERIOUS TO SAY.
Maybe the producers should have asked for an IQ test.
Trump would have failed it.
Then, we could have heard what Biden had to say.

I hope the next debates will be monitored by a better guy than Wallace.
It was obvious that he didn't want to get on Trump's bad side...
I hope Biden will leave the stage next time he's interrupted.

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 3:43 am 
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TRUMP'S

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AMERICA

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:48 am 
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Trump: ‘I Don’t Know Who the Proud Boys Are’
The comments came after Trump on Tuesday told the group to ‘stand back and stand by’ and refused to issue a blanket condemnation of white supremacist organizations.

https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2020-09-30/trump-i-dont-know-who-the-proud-boys-are
By Claire Hansen, Staff Writer Sept. 30, 2020, at 4:34 p.m.

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U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on his way to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on September 30, 2020 in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday denied any knowledge of the violent far-right Proud Boys just hours after he directed the group to "stand back and stand by" when pressed to condemn white supremacist organizations during Tuesday night's presidential debate.

"I don't know who the Proud Boys are. You'll have to give me a definition because I really don't know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down and let law enforcement do their work," Trump told reporters at the White House.

The president then echoed his comments from Tuesday night, insisting that the "real problem" is antifa, the broad, far-left militant anti-facist movement.

"Whatever group you are talking about, let law enforcement do the work. Now, antifa is a real problem. Because the problem is on the left. And Biden refuses to talk about it," Trump said.

Trump also again refused to explicitly condemn white supremacists. When asked by a reporter if he welcomed support from white supremacist groups or would denounce them, Trump said that "law and order" was important to his campaign, and added, "I have always denounced any form – any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also – Joe Biden has to say something about antifa."

The comments come after Trump sparked outrage and calls for clarification from some Republican lawmakers when he refused to issue a blanket condemnation of white supremacist groups when pressed repeatedly Tuesday night by debate moderator Chris Wallace and former Vice President Joe Biden.

"Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Wallace asked Trump during the debate.

After talking about left-wing violence, Trump said he'd be willing to denounce such groups and asked, "Give me a name. Who would you like me to condemn?"

"Proud boys," Biden responded.

"Proud boys: Stand back and stand by," Trump replied.

The group's members celebrated the president's comments on social media.

On Wednesday, Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only Black Republican senator, called on Trump to clarify what he meant.

"I think he misspoke, I think he should correct it. If he doesn't correct it I guess he didn't misspeak," Scott said.

The Proud Boys, a far-right, "Western-chauvinist" group, have grown in prominence in recent years. The group is vocally supportive of Trump, and members have been charged with hate crimes, acts of violence and vandalism. The FBI considers the organization to have ties to white nationalism – a charge the group's leaders have denied.

Earlier this month, FBI Director Chrisopher Wray testified to Congress that white supremacist groups and actors account for the largest chunk of racially motivated domesitc terrorism in the U.S.

"Within the domestic terrorism bucket, the category as a whole, racially motivated violent extremism is, I think, the biggest bucket within that larger group. And within the racially motivated violent extremist bucket, people subscribing to some kind of white supremacist-type ideology is certainly the biggest chunk of that," Wray said.

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 10:07 am 
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Saying he doesn't know about the "Proud Boys" prevent him from condemning them.
So practical, isn't it ?
Even the stupidest fan of Trump deeply know about the "Proud Boys".
So Trump knows too.
ANOTHER LIE TO COVER HIS ASS

Does he really think we're a bunch a stupid folks ?

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 Post subject: Re: TRUMP
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 10:19 am 
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Mij wrote:
Saying he doesn't know about the "Proud Boys" prevent him from condemning them.
So practical, isn't it ?
Even the stupidest fan of Trump deeply know about the "Proud Boys".
So Trump knows too.
ANOTHER LIE TO COVER HIS ASS

Does he really think we're a bunch a stupid folks ?


"I don't know who the Proud Boys are. You'll have to give me a definition because I really don't know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down and let law enforcement do their work,"

The most amazing part about this article for me is that he claims to not know who they are, and then in the same breath says he was telling them to "let law enforcement do their work." So you don't know who they are, but yet you were giving them instructions. Interesting. :roll:

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