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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:30 pm 
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Another show! San Diego.

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 1:02 pm 
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coevad wrote:
Another show! San Diego.

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They need to come to Sac or SF at least... :idea:


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:36 am 
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Guests....

Steve Vai has no calendar dates during the SoCal Zappa shows.

Vinnie will be in Oregon(17th) on the Herbie Hancock tour.

Ed Mann's fb page says he a "Former Lobbyist at The Bizarre World of Frank Zappa". Was he unhappy?

Don & Bunk's site says
Don Preston and Bunk Gardner
THEE MOTHERS OF INVENTION
NOT A HOLOGRAM TOUR
- they played Zappanale a few weeks ago.

who else.....

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 7:04 pm 
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coevad wrote:
Guests....

Steve Vai has no calendar dates during the SoCal Zappa shows.

Vinnie will be in Oregon(17th) on the Herbie Hancock tour.

Ed Mann's fb page says he a "Former Lobbyist at The Bizarre World of Frank Zappa". Was he unhappy?

Don & Bunk's site says
Don Preston and Bunk Gardner
THEE MOTHERS OF INVENTION
NOT A HOLOGRAM TOUR
- they played Zappanale a few weeks ago.

who else.....

Dweezil, Ike Willis, Tommy Mars, Napoleon, Arthur Barrow, Chad, Punky Meadows, Michael Kenyon?


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 5:48 pm 
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‘Zappa at Dizzy’s’ a frankly deep dive for Mike Keneally

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/en ... e-keneally


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:14 pm 
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Baked Potato report:

I did not attend.

Ralph Humphrey sat in for Big Swifty on Thursday night. Jamie Kime was the other guest.

Saw some photos by Gary T.




I'm thinking about bringing stuff to get signed tonight.

edit - fuuuuuuuck! Just found out there's three opening acts tonight. They better play some Zappa tunes.

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2019 11:49 am 
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Saw the Whisky show last night. Ian Underwood was a special guest on The Black Page, Peaches, and maybe one other that I can't remember. Blew my fucking mind.


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2019 12:51 pm 
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thankspete wrote:
Saw the Whisky show last night. Ian Underwood was a special guest on The Black Page, Peaches, and maybe one other that I can't remember. Blew my fucking mind.

Mind blown as well, pete. Ian also played on Cosmik Debris, I think.






The band started right at 11pm and right off the bat there were sound issues. Ray's amp was giving him problems. Like, no sound.
Mr. Nordegg tried to fix it as the set progressed. They ended up bringing the house amp back down the stairs and set it up as Ray sang his guitar parts until the rig was ready.

1. Zomby Woof
2. Alien Orifice (w/ restart 2X)
3. The Evil Prince
4. City Of Tiny Lights (Ray's guitar's back)
5. What's New In Baltimore?
6. Hacky Sack (?) unreleased 1970 session track
7. Tell Me You Love Me (Eric Dover - guitar, vocal)
8. Carolina Hardcore Ecstacy(ED)

I need to get with my friend for the rest of the set. He filmed most of the show.


They did do Whipping Post towards the end.
Ahmet came out and sang My Guitar and Dead Girls of London(w/ extremely zany improv) to close it out.

Mike Keneally was incredible to watch. I was 15 feet in front of him the entire set.

Scott Thunes was, well, Scott Thunes. He was quite livid about the moronic smart phone users recording with their flashlights on. Many times he showed his finger and shouted expletives in their direction. They should redo the artwork on the cover of Man From Utopia w/ Scott's face in place of Frank's as he swats at the flashlights in the crowd while crushing his guitar neck w/ his left hand to commemorate his outrage. It was quite a sight to see.
Oh, and his bass playing was immaculate!

Joe Travers was a thunderous monster on his kit. He was the spokesman on song info and special guests.

Ian Underwood was a big surprise for sure. He played on Keneally's rig so those of us at stage right had a great view.

The band played til 1:30am.
I got home a 3am.

Hollywood!

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 6:51 pm 
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^^^ 8) 8) 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:10 am 
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Excellent review Daveo'

I hope Scott doesn't pop his heart.....

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 5:11 pm 
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The complete list:

1. Zomby Woof
2. Alien Orifice
3. The Evil Prince
4. Khaki Sack
5. City of Tiny Lites
6. #2 (Joe said they found some hand written music(by FZ) in an old drawer. Each one was numbered)
7. What’s New in Baltimore?
8. Tell Me You Love Me w/ Eric Dover (played w/ Alice Cooper, Slash's Snake Pit and Jellyfish)
9. Carolina Hardcore Ecstasy w/ Eric Dover
10. Farther Oblivion (a blistering 15min. version)
11. Andy
12. The Black Page w/ Ian Underwood (Ian played it solo for a few minutes, then the band slowly kicked in)
13. Peaches En Regalia w/ Ian Underwood
14. Cosmik Debris w/ Toshi Yanagi (Jimmy Kimmel Live band guitarist) and Ian
15. Whipping Post w/ Toshi Yanagi
16. Cheepnis
17. My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mama w/ Ahmet Zappa
18. Dead Girls of London w/ Ahmet Zappa
19. I’m the Slime

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photos by J. Bell

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Last edited by coevad on Sun Aug 25, 2019 10:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 5:18 pm 
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Scott points out the riff-raff!

bonus pic by Chris M.

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 7:10 pm 
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:twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 10:31 am 
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coevad wrote:









6. Hacky Sack (?) unreleased 1970 session track


The answer to this question is "Khaki Sack"


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 9:23 am 
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Trendmonger wrote:
coevad wrote:










6. Hacky Sack (?) unreleased 1970 session track


The answer to this question is "Khaki Sack"


Yup. That sounds right, Gary.
I knew it was something a little different. And so was the song structure.

And here it is. https://youtu.be/evjzsxFSiGs

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2019 3:14 pm 
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THANKS coevad for the write-up and pictures!!!

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 5:17 pm 
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^My pleasure.

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 7:17 am 
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Don't suppose there's any chance this great looking concert line up might consider giving a performance in Australia????


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:32 pm 
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One can only hope.....

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 6:35 am 
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Live After Death: Inside Music’s Booming New Hologram Touring Industry
With specters of Frank Zappa and Roy Orbison attracting respectable audiences, are holograms truly music’s final frontier?

By Kory Grow
September 10, 2019 5:06PM ET
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/hologram-tours-roy-orbison-frank-zappa-whitney-houston-873399/

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"It's a concert, but it's more than a concert," explains a fan of the Zappa hologram concert experience.
Bryan Weber*


A recent tribute concert dubbed The Bizarre World of Frank Zappa in Huntington, New York had all the markings of a concert by the rock iconoclast from nerdy fans geeking out about the night’s guitar players before the show to doo-wop intro music but with one marked problem: Frank Zappa died in 1993. The mustachioed musician at the center of it all, playing alongside erstwhile members of Zappa’s band, wasn’t a real person at all. It was a hologram.

To be fair, the apparition truly looked like an otherworldly version of Frank as it played guitar, adjusted its shirt, and wiggled its mustache. It sounded like him, too, since the audio came from an uncirculated 1974 live recording. It was enough of a spectacle that the packed house gave it a standing ovation. “At first, I felt a little sad,” a fan, Annelie Indilla, said after the show. “I got a little choked up for a second, because he’s not around anymore, but I just really liked it. It’s very unusual. It was very well done.”

The show was sold out, and the rest of the tour sold well, too, with people paying as much as $125 a ticket. Similarly, a Roy Orbison hologram tour last year was a financial success, selling 1,800 seats on average per show. There’s enough demand that those tours have more dates lined up — Orbison’s will be touring with one of Buddy Holly this fall — and holographic versions of Ronnie James Dio, Whitney Houston, and Amy Winehouse will be hitting the road later this year. It’s a trend that marks a new wave of holographic tours that is much more sustainable than one-offs, like the Tupac hologram at Coachella in 2012.

“On the shows I went out to, I asked the fans what they thought of it afterward,” says Ronnie James Dio’s widow Wendy, who also does industry relations for Eyellusion. “And there wasn’t one negative comment whatsoever. They were all thanking me for bringing him back.”

Getting these shows to the public, however, hasn’t been easy. “The hardest thing is convincing people what the show is,” says Jeff Pezzuti, CEO and founder of Eyellusion, which produces the Zappa and Dio tours. “It’s very hard to describe. It doesn’t translate as well to YouTube or photos. People think they’re coming to watch a movie, and it’s not that at all. It’s a live show.”

For the Zappa and Dio shows, Eyellusion has built a special stage that places the apparition in the middle, and musicians play on either side of it, as LED screens all around the screen show off wild animations. The company that handles the Orbison, Holly, and Winehouse shows, Base Hologram, projects their specters on a translucent screen in front of the musicians. The latter is a modern effect, while Eyellusion uses a variation on a 19th century magician’s trick called “Pepper’s Ghost,” in which a moving image is projected onto Plexiglas.

“Our technology gives us an enormous amount of freedom,” says Robert Ringe, Base’s CEO of distribution and touring. “It gives us the ability to have the hologram walk onto the stage from the wings and interact with either the band, the orchestra, the musical director, the audience, et cetera.”

Ringe says that when the Orbison hologram played London, there were people dancing in the aisles. At the Dio shows, Pezzuti has seen parents with young kids. “We finished our 18th show last night, and maybe 15 percent of the audience has been made up of kids 15 or younger,” he says. “To me, it’s amazing.”

Phil Sandhaus, whose Sandhaus Entertainment manages Buddy Holly’s estate, says he was initially skeptical of holograms when they came onto the market but that he now “doesn’t have the luxury to ignore them.” “Very few people saw Buddy Holly onstage back in the day,” he says. “But we’re going to create a great entertainment experience.”

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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 10:18 pm 
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Many thanks for sharing the set lists and reviews fellow fans. Please keep it coming. So want to see one of these.


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 Post subject: Re: Zappa Hologram Tour
PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:31 am 
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Opinion

The Gray Market: What the Craze for Holograms of Dead Pop Stars Could Mean for the Market for Performance Art (and Other Insights)

Our columnist examines how the growing business of touring hologram "performances" could open the door to eternity in contemporary art.

Tim Schneider, January 13, 2020

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(Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Coachella)
Snoop Dogg (L) and a hologram of dead rap icon Tupac Shakur perform onstage together during the 2012 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival.

Every Monday morning, artnet News brings you The Gray Market.
The column decodes important stories from the previous week
and offers unparalleled insight into the inner workings of the art industry
in the process.

This week, extending the art business into the afterlife…


PHANTOM THREAD

On Tuesday, the New York Times Magazine published Mark Binelli’s deep dive into the weird, wild world of dead music stars “touring” as holograms. And if this same technological (and entrepreneurial) innovation doesn’t cross over into the art market in the coming years, I’ll be so stunned that my own heart just might give out.

For the uninitiated, this surreal new chapter in pop stardom essentially began at the 2012 edition of Coachella, the annual pop-culture-shaping music festival in California’s Indio Valley, when visual-effects studio Digital Domain created a three-dimensional hologram of slain rapper Tupac Shakur that “performed” a pair of of his songs onstage with Snoop Dogg (whose metamorphosis from west-coast-rap firebrand and murder-trial defendant into middle-aged lifestyle guru and Martha Stewart bestie is more mind-blowing than any VFX I’ve ever seen).

Although Digital Domain went bankrupt shortly after the festival, Pac’s digital ghost—along with the good old-fashioned power of the dollar—dynamited the gates to the musical hereafter. A slew of new venture-backed businesses rose up to begin crafting holograms and striking pacts with artist’s estates for the rights to represent late stars onstage, in both senses of the word “represent.”

In the years since, the list of dead pop icons who have re-materialized for adoring fans includes Michael Jackson (at the 2014 Billboard Music Awards), Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Frank Zappa, Ronnie James Dio (who replaced Ozzy Osbourne as Black Sabbath’s frontman and enabled one very metal auction), and even legendary opera singer Maria Callas. And if you think this phantom express is slowing down anytime soon, I would advise you to get the hell off the tracks; a hologram of Whitney Houston will set out on an international tour starting in February.

Although this situation sounds absurd, the most stunning aspect may be that, based on the early returns, it appears to be absurd in the same way that selling milk from an almond once was. Here’s Binelli:
Deborah Speer, a features editor at Pollstar, which covers the live-entertainment industry, told me that based on the numbers she has seen for the Orbison and Zappa tours, “obviously, there’s a market” for hologram shows. According to the trade publication, the solo Orbison tour grossed nearly $1.7 million over 16 shows, selling 71 percent of the seats available, while Zappa sold an average of 973 seats per show, nearly selling out venues in Amsterdam and London.
It turns out that if you’re a famous performer, you don’t need to be drawing breath to draw a paying audience. And that apparent fact is emerging at an especially opportune moment in contemporary art.

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(Courtesy of the artist and Sean Kelly Gallery)
Marina Abramović, The Artist is Present (2010)

ALL THE (ART) WORLD’S A STAGE


Now, plenty of painters, sculptors, and other makers of discrete objects continue selling briskly even after they’ve died; their corporeal absence creates little to no drag on business (sometimes, it boosts it). But historically, we haven’t been able to say the same for performance artists. And this is especially important given the strong gravitation toward live art by artists, industry insiders, and even the general public over the past decade.

As my colleague Ben Davis argues, the inflection point was Marina Abramović’s “The Artist Is Present,” the zeitgeist-puncturing 2010 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. The show certainly didn’t elevate performance art beyond parody—see Fred Armisen’s mockumentary TV series Documentary Now! or Ruben Östlund’s festival-conquering film The Square—but it did propel the genre to a level of familiarity that made it a justifiable, sometimes loving, touchstone for an audience outside the traditional art world. For every satire, there also seemed to be at least one earnest celebrity homage that lodged performance art deeper in the popular consciousness. Fans include hip hop mogul Jay-Z, actor/director/artist Shia Labeouf, runway-rap pioneer A$AP Rocky, John Cheever’s favorite indie-rock band, the National… the list goes on.

Enthusiasm for artists or trends within the art world hasn’t always tracked with enthusiasm outside it. The tired specter of the “sell-out” keeps haunting us. However, the recent trajectory of performance art has avoided this turbulence.

Judges at the last two Venice Biennales awarded top prizes to performance works: Anne Imhof’s Faust won the Golden Lion in 2017, and the Lithuanian Pavilion’s climate-change opera Sun & Sea took home the trophy for best national presentation in 2019. Mega-gallery Pace is making a high-stakes live-performance program a central pillar of its mainstream-targeting future strategy. And although MoMA eventually scrapped the performance-focused “Art Bay” once set to be the nucleus of its latest renovation, New York’s newest (and most controversial) cultural space, the Shed, largely exists to champion the genre.

All of the above (and much more) reinforces that performance has become a major force in contemporary art’s evolution, and will continue to shape its future. Which leads us back to those hologram tours.

Image
(Photo by Frank Hoensch/Redferns)
A hologram of dead opera star Maria Callas “singing” onstage during a concert at Berlin’s Admiralspalast in 2019.

BREAK ON THROUGH TO THE OTHER SIDE

Pop-star holograms are exploding out of a chemical reaction between three elements that have been influencing human decision-making for thousands of years: supply, demand, and survival instinct. Binelli points out in the Times that, per Pollstar, “roughly half of the 20 top-grossing North American touring acts of 2019 were led by artists who were at least 60 years old,” including the top three: the Rolling Stones, Elton John, and Bob Seger. His conversation with a member of one major hologram-production company suggests this technology could transform those data points from evidence of an imminent music-industry crisis into evidence of an enduring business opportunity:
“If you’re an estate in the age of streaming and algorithms, you’re thinking: Where is our revenue coming from?” Brian Baumley, who handles publicity for Eyellusion, told me. Some of those estates, Baumley bets, will arrive at a reasonable conclusion about the dead artists whose legacies they hope to extend: “We have to put them back on the road.”

The art industry has just as much of a stake in extending the legacies—and profit windows—of major talents approaching (or past) the ends of their productive lives. By this point in time, the interplay between aesthetic evangelism and financial opportunism has been incentivizing choices within artists’ studios and estates for over a century, with each project finding its ethical level based on weighing those two factors.

Consider that every single plaster, bronze, or marble cast by Auguste Rodin was actually fabricated by another skilled artisan using only Rodin’s small clay models. Or that the Dia Art Foundation and the artist’s estate (with funding from Gagosian) completed Walter De Maria’s installation Truck Trilogy four years after his death. Or that the estates of Roy Lichtenstein and Constantin Brancusi both produced new editions of important sculptures decades past the dates their respective creators beamed up to that big studio in the sky.

Assuming performance art’s popularity surge continues, then, why wouldn’t a major gallery and/or institution be tempted to restage, say, the centerpiece of Abramović’s “The Artist Is Present” via hologram for a paying audience? Abramović herself might—might—be appalled by the idea as she lives and breathes now, but anything can happen when opportunities present themselves to estate executors. After all, visitors to the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida can already interact with a ghost of its namesake digitally resurrected on flat screens throughout the institution.

Image
(Courtesy of Art21)
Joan Jonas performing Reanimation, still from Art21 “Fiction” (2014).

The potential here isn’t limited to postmortem programming, either. Holograms could also be used during performance artists’ lifetimes to stage their pieces farther, wider, and more frequently than if they had to physically make the trips themselves.

Precedents already exist for this. Binelli mentions in his piece that Chicago drill-rap standard-bearer Chief Keef performed by hologram at an out-of-state music festival to avoid arrest while he had active warrants looming over him in 2015, and Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has campaigned by hologram in multiple locations at once for years.

Obviously, these possibilities are only possibilities right now. But they are made more likely by the music industry’s rush to embrace—and monetize—hologram technology to overcome its biggest stars’ deaths. Continued public demand for performance works will only increase the pressure on the art industry to follow suit in the future. And if the genre’s most physically punishing works have taught us nothing else, it’s that we should never underestimate humanity’s ability to transcend the seemingly impossible.

[The New York Times]

That’s all for this week. ‘Til next time, remember: whether the result is a hologram, a painting, or a kid,
anyone who creates anything is on some level trying to beat the reaper.

https://news.artnet.com/opinion/pop-sta ... rt-1750800

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