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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2020 11:19 pm 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Another day of no new cases.....

according to the man and by man I mean Jacinda, NZ has:

1,504 coronavirus cases

1,154 confirmed

22 Active - 5

350 probable

21 dead

1,461 + 5 recovered

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PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2020 2:50 am 
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Grimes and Elon Musk tweak baby name after confusion around compliance with state laws
Grimes and Elon Musk's decision to name their newborn son 'X Æ A-12' certainly raised some eyebrows.

Now the musician and Tesla CEO have changed their baby's name almost a month after he was born.

Whether they chose to do so or didn't have a choice isn't immediately clear, but the small tweak does mean the name now fits better with California's naming and birth certificate requirements.

What's wrong with the old name?
California's Office of Vital Records says names on a birth certificate must only contain "the 26 alphabetical characters of the English language with appropriate punctuation, if necessary".

That means hyphens and apostrophes are allowed, but in California, ideograms, pictographs and even diacritical marks aren't permitted — let alone numbers.

US family law attorney David Glass told People that while the name wouldn't have been accepted, it wasn't technically illegal.

He said it was likely a birth certificate with the name X Æ A-12 would be rejected.

"They have an opportunity to appeal the rejection of the birth certificate application but it's unlikely that it will be granted because, again, California … has been struggling with using symbols," he told the US publication.

"Your child won't have an official name and won't have a birth certificate and you can't get a social security number until you have a birth certificate and on down the line."

What's the new name?
Replying to an Instagram comment, Grimes confirmed the name had been changed to X Æ A-Xii.

"Roman numerals. Looks better tbh," Grimes explained in a later comment.

Whether the new edition of the bub's name has been officially approved or not isn't yet known.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-26/grimes-and-elon-musk-tweak-baby-name/12287768

Fuck Musk is out there, he should have the the whole way and given the Kid a Binary Name "00110000110"

Two hundred fifty-six or byte :roll:


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2020 11:32 pm 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
6th straight day of no new cases.....

according to the man and by man I mean Jacinda, NZ has:

1,504 coronavirus cases

1,154 confirmed

350 probable

8 Active - 13

22 dead +1

1,474 + 12 recovered

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hey punk where you goin' with no mask on your face.....


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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2020 12:18 am 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
in other news, and couldn't you use some other news.....

Our little nation has been gripped with the search for two missing
trampers since they were reported mia a couple of weeks back.....

Trampers Jessica O'Connor and Dion Reynolds found alive after 19 days missing
Nina Hindmarsh Sam Sherwood and Cherie Sivignon·07:21, May 28th, 2020

Image
Braden Fastier
Dion Reynolds and Jessica O'Connor at Nelson Airport.

The family of one of the two missing trampers in the Kahurangi National Park say they are "absolutely over the moon" they have been found alive after 19 days.

Jessica O'Connor and Dion Reynolds, both 23-years-old, had not been seen after entering the Anatori Valley to go tramping on May 9th.

Police said it appeared the pair got lost a few days later, and then were both injured.

There were "smiles and relief" when the trampers were found in "very rugged bush", police said.

They were found around 12:49pm on Wednesday after a search helicopter spotted smoke and saw two people waving at them, said Tasman police search and rescue officer Sergeant Malcolm York.

Image
Braden Fastier
Dion Reynolds and Jessica O'Connor were missing for 19 days in the Kahurangi National Park.

The pair were picked up by an Air Force NH90 helicopter, and had "excellent equipment" that kept them alive.

When they were rescued they were chatty - more than expected given length of time and lack of food, York said.

St John said the two were taken to Nelson Hospital with minor injuries; Reynolds suffered a strained ankle and O'Connor a strained back from a fall. They walked into the emergency department with blankets over their heads.

A friend greeted Reynolds with a big hug outside the hospital's doors and a paramedic carried two big red tramping packs into the hospital.

O'Connor's father, Mark O'Connor, told Stuff the family were "absolutely over the moon".

Image
Braden Fastier/Stuff
Dion Reynolds and Jessica O'Connor arrive at Nelson Airport via a NZDF helicopter.

O'Connor and his wife, Simone, were at the search headquarters when they found out someone had been found.

"Then they confirmed it was Jess and Dion and then they told us out there so it was just fantastic."

"The search team and the police have done such a fantastic job, fabulous."

The couple spoke to their daughter on the phone from her hospital bed in Nelson.

"It's Jess," were the first words from her, which was greeted with tears from her parents.

"She was pretty overwhelmed, so I'm picking pretty pleased to be found."

Image
Braden Fastier
Dion Reynolds with St John after he was found alive with his tramping partner Jessica O'Connor.

When asked if they ever lost hope, Mark O'Connor said it was "getting pretty difficult for a while".

Whereas Simone O'Connor said she "never lost hope".

"I know she's a very strong woman, very determined."

Simone O'Connor said the family was "over the moon ... No more sleepless nights."

Reynolds’ sister, Stephanie-Lee Ludlow, told Stuff she had a short conversation with with him on Wednesday. She was unsure how they survived, but said they were “both happy to be out”.

Image
Braden Fastier
Dion Reynolds gets a warm hug after being found alive.

“I'm so thankful to everyone who have helped to rescue Dion and his Jessica.

“As soon I found out he was missing I cried... I'd only just started reconnecting with him in the last six months... And I just wanted him and Jessica to be safe and well.”

Reynold’s former boss at Roots Bar in Takaka said it was “incredible” the pair had been found.

“We are buzzing. We just had a shot of rum [at the bar] to celebrate and we had goosebumps. It’s such a buzz … this morning when I woke up I had a horrible feeling in the pit of my stomach, because it’s just been a long time. Just never lose hope."

She said it just showed how LandSAR search teams were “worth every penny”.

“It must be so rewarding for them, such a buzz, when a search ends this way. They have done such an amazing job.”

Reynold’s roommate in Takaka, Simona Barnova, said she had just found out the news.

Image
Supplied
Dion Reynolds, left, and Jessica O'Connor, entered Kahurangi National Park on May 9.

“It’s just awesome. It was tough [the last few weeks] because we have been trying to find out where they are and thinking of them everyday, and it was not pleasant,” she said.

“I can’t wait for the stories they’re going to tell us. We are actually all together [Reynold’s friends] and can’t wait to see him. We are calling as many friends as we can and sending messages with the news.

“I hope they are OK and going to recover soon.”

Heather Turner Behringer, whose daughter was close friends with both O'Connor and Reynolds, and had been helping organise food donations for LandSAR search teams, said she was “too overcome with joy" to speak.

Image
Stuff
O'Connor and Reynolds were found alive near the Anatori River in the Kahurangi National Park.

“It’s a miracle,” she said.“I don’t even know details after talking to [Jess’] mum. Amazing kids. Amazing efforts.”

Turner Behringer said she knew the Anatori coast well.

“Truly, a hell of a place with extreme beauty. To survive it is miraculous.”

LandSAR Golden Bay president Steve Cottle said search teams were “ecstatic”.

“To see the look on mum and dad’s face when we got to tell them it was them, found alive, what an amazing thing. Such a great result - it’s been a whole top of a south effort, and so great.”

Whilst the trampers were lost, temperatures reached a bitterly cold minus 8 degrees Celsius near the exposed tops where windchill was a factor, a metservice spokesman said.

Image
NZDF
The NZ Defence Force NH90 has been winching search teams into the Kahurangi National Park in the search for the missing trampers.

Sunday and Monday saw the heaviest rainfall between 60 and 115 millimetres with "quite strong winds" the spokesman said.

The search resumed at first light on Wednesday morning, after the bad weather and dangerous conditions subsided.

Tasman Police Search and Rescue officer Sergeant Malcolm York said six teams had flown into the search area by the NZ Defence Force (NZDF).

York said five specialist tracking experts had been brought in from around New Zealand, as well as three search dog teams, to bolster the operation.

More than 30 police staff and volunteers worked on the search operation from a number of different locations.

Heather Simpson, who had been camping with friends of O'Connor and Reynolds at the Anatori camp, was one of the last people to see the pair.

Image
Nina Hindmarsh/Stuff
The Anatori River and catchment is the area of interest where search and rescue teams have been searching for the O'Connor and Reynolds over the past few days.

She said O'Connor and Reynolds stopped at their campsite before heading up the river.

"I asked where they were going and how long for, and they said they were heading up river and had 4-6 days [worth] of food, which they planned to ration and stretch by fasting as long as possible, to spend longer," she said.

The pair were in "good spirits" and seemed excited to go adventuring together, she said.

"Both [were] young, fit and experienced with good gear and intelligence and skills."

The pair had both been living and working in the Tasman District before their disappearance, O'Connor as a kayak guide and Reynolds as a chef.

Image
NZDF
The NZ Defence Force helps in the search for trampers missing in the Kahurangi National Park Golden Bay.

A Givealittle page set up by O'Connor's brother to fundraise money and show support for LandSAR's "incredible volunteers", had raised $26,685 by Wednesday morning.

LandSAR Golden Bay president, Steve Cottle, posted on the Golden Bay Community Board on Tuesday, extending a "huge thank you for all your overwhelming support".

"We are extremely grateful to Roots Bar Takaka and Meals For Motueka for donating hot food to feed the search teams," he said.


Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/121638 ... ssing?rm=a


Joy for trampers as hope descends from the sky
Tim Newman·16:23, May 28th, 2020

"I've been looking for you guys."

Air Force Search and Rescue Medic Jason Denharder was the first person in more than two weeks to speak to missing trampers Jessica O'Connor and Dion Reynolds on Wednesday afternoon.

After being winched down from the NH90 Air Force helicopter hovering above the stranded pair, Denharder entered the three-metre clearing where O'Connor and Reynolds had been waiting.

He said he could see the excitement on their faces as he was being lowered, and just after landing was enveloped in a group hug.

Image
Stuff
The down-draft from the helicopter’s rotor blades parted the tree canopy to allow crews to see missing trampers Dion Reynolds and Jessica O'Connor some 50ft below.

Image
Braden Fastier/Stuff

The Air Force NH 90 crew that rescued Dion Reynolds and Jessica O'Connor. From left Corporal Tom Hanson, Sergeant Byron Hodge, Captain Matthew Mullins, Search and Rescue Medic Jason Denharder, and Flight Lieutenant Loic Ifrah.

"They were quite overjoyed, that's when they came in and gave me a cuddle.

"After a while they realised the gravity of the situation, and that's when the emotions started to come out."

Denharder said aside from hunger, the pair were walking around and had only very minor injuries.

While normally bland meals are the order of the day after a long time without food, the pair broke their fast with a celebratory chocolate bar.

"The chocolate was a bit of delight after 18 days – she had a Snickers and he had a Moro and a Snickers, I think he was a bit more hungry."

Keeping the helicopter steady throughout the rescue was
Flight Lieutenant Loic "Frenchy" Ifrah.

Image
Not-For-Syndication
The Air Force NH90 helicopter in the Kahurangi National Park, preparing to winch missing trampers Dion Reynolds and Jessica O'Connor from a small clearing in the bush, after searchers spotted a plume of smoke from a fire lit by the pair.

The crew from 3 Squadron had initially been tasked with winching in different ground teams into the search area.

However, they were dispatched to the rescue after a commercial helicopter pilot had located the missing pair at about midday on Wednesday, after seeing smoke from a fire they had made.

Image
Supplied
Searchers looking down at a small clearing at the head of the Frazer Stream, where Jessica O'Connor and Dion Reynolds were rescued from the Kahurangi National Park.

After receiving the co-ordinates, the Air Force crew reached the location about 45 minutes after the initial sighting.

Ifrah said it was very lucky the first helicopter had flown over their location when the sun was directly overhead.

"It's pretty inhospitable terrain, and you really have to be at the right place at the right time ... because seeing in to the holes of the trees when they are casting shadow is virtually impossible."

Image
Supplied
Hi us again the rescued trampers Dion and Jess.

Ifrah said for anyone to have been able to spot them from the air, they needed to be within 50-100 metres of their location.

He said when they arrived at the scene they could not see the fire, but could tell by the smell of smoke that they were in the right place.

Corporal Tom Hanson was responsible for winching the two to safety, which was a difficult task given the rugged terrain where they were found.

Hanson said during the rescue the helicopter stayed in a 150-foot hover above the ground, with the forest canopy reaching to within 25-feet of the left-hand side of the aircraft and 50-feet to the right, as the terrain sloped away.

"They were just stoked to be saved, and for Jess especially .... very emotional."

Ifrah said the search teams had always remained hopeful the pair could be brought back alive.

"You don't give up hope in these types of jobs, that's why we committed a bunch of time and resources to it.

"Obviously as time goes by you do tend to fear for the worst. It was very lucky – it was a great outcome."


Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300022 ... om-the-sky

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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2020 8:17 am 
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Riot erupts in downtown Portland after peaceful protest of George Floyd killing
Updated May 30, 2020; Posted May 29, 2020

https://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2020/05/protest-escalates-at-downtown-portland-justice-center.html

Portland

Riot erupts in downtown Portland after peaceful protest of George Floyd killing

Updated May 30, 2020; Posted May 29, 2020


By Molly Harbarger | The Oregonian/OregonLive

After hours of largely peaceful demonstrations, violence escalated late Friday in downtown Portland, as hundreds of people gathered to protest the Minneapolis police killing of a black man.

The death of George Floyd has triggered a wave of national outrage that culminated in a chaotic night of vandalism and fires in downtown Portland. The mayor gave a stunned early-morning TV interview, during which he said no one was prepared for the level of violence that broke out.

Mayor Ted Wheeler declared a state of emergency shortly before 4 a.m. and implemented a nightly curfew that he said took effect immediately. The 8 p.m. curfew will last through Sunday morning, he said.

The situation erupted a little around 11 p.m. after people marched to downtown from an earlier demonstration in North Portland. Protesters congregated at the Multnomah County Justice Center, which houses the downtown jail and police precinct. People smashed windows and caused fires inside a first-floor office while corrections records staff were working inside, said Chris Liedle, a Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office spokesperson. Workers were able to leave unharmed and the building’s sprinklers doused the flames, he said.

Portland Police labeled the gathering an “unlawful assembly" and started to move in toward the crowd. Before that, police had remained distant from protesters throughout the day.

Police officers in riot gear arrived around 11:15 p.m. Police used tear gas, pepper balls and stun grenades to attempt to break up the protest.

“If you do not go home now, force will be used to disperse you,” police said on Twitter.

But protesters spread out, and the chaos continued through downtown.

Some people spray painted buildings and smashed windows at a nearby Apple and Microsoft store. One man threw his skateboard into a nearby Starbucks window, shattering the glass. Around 11:30 p.m., people broke the glass doors of the closed Pioneer Place mall and went inside. Several people left with items from stores.

Mannequin parts lay strewn across Yamhill Street near the mall outside of the H&M store.

Nearby, several people emptied a dumpster and set pallets and cardboard on fire, blocking the intersection of Southwest Fourth Avenue and Alder Street. A police officer could be heard on a loudspeaker declaring the event an unlawful assembly and warning the crowd to leave the area or risk officers using force against them.

Police surrounded the flames and waited for firefighters, who extinguished the fire before a second one erupted at the same place minutes later. Around downtown, some cars were set aflame.

Around 11:50 p.m., police declared the situation a riot and said they were closing down most Portland streets to traffic, telling people to leave immediately or “be subject to force.”

Yet police largely did not attempt to stop people from breaking into businesses, instead using tear gas or stun grenades to break up growing crowds. Several officers in riot gear guarded the Justice Center, where the protest first escalated nearly two hours earlier.

Blocks away, people continued to break into businesses. A crowd returned to the Apple Store, where someone took a desktop computer and used it to break the front doors of a different section of Pioneer Place mall. After entering the mall, people stole bags and other gear from Tory Burch, a high-end retailer.

Across Southwest Fifth Avenue, some people used fireworks to light a small fire at a Chase bank, then moved across the street to a Wells Fargo bank after police arrived.

A crowd of nearly 300 people remained near Pioneer Courthouse Square around 1:10 a.m. Some moved a few blocks toward Target, where people had broken into the store. People also smashed in the windows of a Kassab Jewelers.

An hour later, hundreds of people remained scattered throughout downtown. Police near Southwest Fourth Avenue and Morrison Street fired rubber bullets and set off stun grenades.

Portland police announced around 2:15 a.m. that two people had been arrested during the evening. The agency didn’t immediately release any more information about the people taken into custody or the specific circumstances that led to their arrests.

As the violence devolved, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler tweeted a plea to protesters to remain peaceful.

“Portland, this is not us,” he wrote. “When you destroy our city, you are destroying our community. When you act in violence against each other, you are hurting all of us. How does this honor the legacy of George Floyd?”

About an hour later, Wheeler tweeted that he was leaving his dying mother to return to the city due to the carnage.

“I am with family to prepare for her final moments,” the mayor wrote. “This is hard, this is personal, but so is watching my city get destroyed.”

During an interview with KGW around 12:30 a.m. Saturday, Wheeler demanded protesters go home and called their actions a “dismantling of our beloved community.”

“What’s going on right now is flat out breaking the law, violating our community, violating the memory of George Floyd and so many other people on such an important night,” Wheeler said. “I have had enough. The community has had enough, and I’m telling those individuals go home.”

Wheeler said he planned to hold a news conference Saturday and visit some of the businesses along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard that were damaged earlier in the night as protesters marched toward downtown. He said he believed some of the businesses vandalized during the night may have been African-American owned.

Wheeler praised Portland police officers for “showing great restraint” throughout the day and said no one anticipated the scale of the actions from protesters.

“Nobody has seen this kind of brazen abuse of what was supposed to be a night of memory for somebody who was killed by a police force, and now it’s turned into something completely different.”

Until late Friday, police had remained on the periphery of the protests. But tension escalated as marchers made their way toward downtown from Peninsula Park in North Portland, where an evening vigil attracted thousands of people. Some windows of businesses along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard were shattered, and other buildings were tagged with spray-painted messages.

An Oregonian/OregonLive photographer saw a man on a skateboard hit by a car after the car drove toward marchers near the intersection of Northeast Shaver Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. The pedestrian who was hit walked away from the collision, and the car drove away.

The vigil and march were organized by activist network Pacific Northwest Youth Liberation Front. Some members of the group have been holding constant vigil outside the Justice Center. Earlier Friday afternoon, demonstrators spray-painted messages memorializing Floyd and supporting Minneapolis protesters onto stone columns outside the Justice Center.

Protests in downtown Eugene Friday night also led to debris being burned in the streets and inside dumpsters as well as vandalism.

Mark Graves and Dave Killen of The Oregonian/OregonLive contributed to this report, which has been updated throughout the night.
-- Molly Harbarger

mharbarger@oregonian.com

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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2020 12:34 pm 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
according to the man and by man I mean Jacinda, NZ has:

1,504 coronavirus cases

1,154 confirmed

350 probable

1 Active

22 dead

1,481 recovered

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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2020 3:48 pm 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
the plates are restless

Three earthquakes rattle central North Island
Leighton Keith·23:56, May 30th, 2020.

Image
GEONET
A 4.7 magnitude earthquake has shaken the lower North Island.

Three earthquakes have rattled parts of the North Island on Saturday night.

The strongest hit at 10.56pm and was recorded as a 4.7 magnitude earthquake according to the GeoNet website.

It was centred 30km north-west of Levin at a depth of 36km the website said.

There were more than 11,000 reports of the quake from people who felt it right around the country from Northland to almost the bottom of the South Island.

Most rated its strength as light or weak.

The first struck at 7.27pm, it was centred 30km north-west of Levin at a depth of 34km and was recorded as a magnitude of 3.5.

There were 88 reports from people who felt the quake mainly centred around the central North Island area.

Meanwhile the second, which struck at 8.44pm, was centred 20km north-east of Mokau, north Taranaki, at a depth of 20km.

GeoNet received 1121 reports of the quake which was felt as far away as thhti Auckland.

Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/121680 ... rth-island

and

4.7 magnitude earthquake shakes lower North Island
00:11, May 31st, 2020.
GEONET
The earthquake happened at 10.56pm around 30 kilometres northwest of Levin, according to GeoNet.

A 4.7 magnitude earthquake has shaken the lower North Island.

The quake happened at 10.56pm about 30 kilometres northwest of Levin, according to GeoNet.

It had a depth of 36km and more than 11,000 people reported feeling it just after 11pm.

The earthquake comes after a couple of recent shakes in the area.

A 5.8 magnitude earthquake took place 30km northwest of Levin on May 25.

It was followed by a 5.2 magnitude quake in the same location on May 26.

GNS seismic duty officer Jonathan Hanson said those two earthquakes came from the same plate pressures.


Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300024 ... rth-island

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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2020 5:33 am 
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Location: Oregon
Police use tear gas to disperse protesters in downtown Salem; state of emergency declared, curfew instituted
Whitney Woodworth and David Davis, Salem Statesman Journal Published 12:12 a.m. PT May 31, 2020 | Updated 3:19 a.m. PT May 31, 2020

https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2020/05/31/police-use-tear-gas-disperse-protesters-downtown-salem-curfew-instituted/5298432002/

Image

Sounds of explosions and smoke hung in the air around the Oregon State Capitol Building after police declared a protest unlawful and ordered protesters to disperse or be arrested.

A march involving more than 200 demonstrators protesting police brutality and the death of George Floyd turned violent late Saturday.

The march, which began at about 7 p.m. Saturday and remained peaceful for much of the evening, took a turn after 11 p.m. when projectiles were thrown by individuals in the crowd toward officers near the intersection of Church Street NE and Court Street NE.

Salem police spokesman Lt. Treven Upkes said police broke up the crowd and used tear gas after several explosive devices and hard objects were thrown. Just after midnight, he warned that another round of tear gas would be used to break up the crowd.

Upkes said no injuries were reported. No arrests had been made as of midnight.

"All we want is for people to disperse," Upkes said.

Police began making announcements of a curfew in Salem, which was issued by the city manager. The curfew stands until 6 a.m. Sunday and again from 8 p.m. Sunday to 6 a.m. Monday.

The curfew, which applies to the entire city according to the release, prohibits travel on any public street, sidewalk or public place except for individuals going directly to or from their workplace, seeking medical care, avoiding dangerous situations or those that are unhoused.

Shortly after another round of tear gas was used, the crowd around the Capitol building broke up. By 12:30 a.m., it was a ghost town, leaving only empty bottles, the sting and sulfur smell of tear gas and graffiti on the Capitol steps. The drone of sirens continued downtown.

The Saturday protest was the second in Salem demanding justice for the death of Floyd. The Friday evening protest remained peaceful for the duration as demonstrators held vigil on the Capitol steps.

Early Saturday evening, a small group of people gathered outside Glamour Salon, the site of controversy and protests earlier this month after the owner reopened in violation of Gov. Kate Brown's order.

Those outside the salon said they were bracing to protect businesses should violence erupt.

People attending the protest said the event was largely peaceful until someone began tagging the Capitol building with spray paint and a fight broke out.

Earlier in the night, several participants reported having guns pointed at them by people observing the protest.

Those filming the event reported broken bottles, flashbang grenades and fireworks being thrown at police.

Around midnight, as police were ordering people to leave, a group looked for their younger friend frantically, a young woman thanked police for working to keep the crowd safe and a protester gave out antacid liquid medication to help those with their eyes stinging from tear gas.

After the crowd was dispersed at the Capital Mall, tensions heightened outside Glamour Salon.

Fist fights broke out, and police again tear gassed the crowd.

The @cityofsalem has declared a state of emergency & issued an emergency order imposing a curfew throughout the city of #SalemOR in all public places during the following times:

8:00P Sat., 5/30/2020 to 6:00A Sun., 5/31/2020
and
8:00P Sun., 5/31/2020 to 6:00A Mon., 6/1/2020 pic.twitter.com/Ramj86lD02
— Salem Police Dept. (@SalemPoliceDept) May 31, 2020


Salem's state of emergency comes one day after those in the crowd of a 300-person protest in Eugene set a property on fire, smashed the windows of local businesses, battered vehicles with their drivers still inside and set off fireworks, according to the Register-Guard.

Willamette Week reported that on Friday, rioters set fire to the Multnomah County Justice Center, set fires in the streets, and looted downtown shops in Portland.

The violence resulted in Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler ordering an 8 p.m. curfew Saturday and Sunday.

The Oregon Association Chiefs of Police, Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association and Oregon State Police issued a statement Saturday that said the organizations were "unified in condemning the reprehensible actions and tactics demonstrated in Minneapolis that resulted in the tragic death of George Floyd."

The statement said public trust and accountability are paramount for police agencies and officers in a safe, inclusive community.

"We recognize that even isolated incidents of police misconduct anywhere undermine public trust everywhere.," the statement said. "We are dismayed and disgusted when the actions of a few tarnish the reputation of our honorable law enforcement profession and undermine the heroic work our police officers perform in service to our communities."

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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2020 9:13 pm 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
fomo

'If you stay silent, you’re being violent'
Wellington protest at killing of African American George Floyd

Matthew Tso and Laura Wiltshire·16:50, June 1st, 2020.

Image
Robert Kitchin/Stuff
Protestors marched on Monday from Frank Kitts Park, to Parliament, to police headquarters, to the US Embassy to protest the killing of George Floyd.

More than 100 Black Lives Matter protesters marched from Frank Kitts Park to the United States embassy in Wellington on Monday afternoon.

The group gathered following the killing of George Floyd by police in the American city of Minneapolis.

Outside the Embassy of the United States of America they chanted the names of African American victims of police brutality, told stories and shared their experiences.

Protester Casper Howell grew up in Detroit and said he joined the march because he had witnessed police violence.

"All that time, nothing changed. What happened to George Floyd was unacceptable.”

Tanaka Gapare said "[I'm here to] represent black people and stand against injustice. We're also educating people that Black Lives Matter is more than just a movement - we've been suffering for over 400 years. This stems from anger."

Lisa Tafadzwa Moyo said the movement was growing, and awareness was building around the world with every unwarranted death at the hands of police.

"It was important for me [to march] to support black people in general but also to receive the support as a black person in this country."

Jesse Drysdale led the protesters through central Wellington, taking them past the central police station and district court before stopping at Parliament. He then led the group past Police National Headquarters before heading to the Embassy of the United States of America.

He said he was not an organiser but ended up at the front because he wanted his voice to be heard.

The event had earlier been cancelled and replaced by a vigil later in the day, but protestors decided to march anyway.

Drysdale said there was no place for discrimination of any kind in society. He was pleased to see so many people turn up to the protest.

“If you stay silent, you’re being violent.”

More marches were planned at 3pm, with demonstrations at Christchurch's Cathedral Square and Dunedin's The Octagon. At 3.30pm, a march is scheduled to be held in thhti central Auckland. That will be followed by a candlelit vigil at 6pm in Wellington.

Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300025 ... orge-floyd

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2020 1:51 am 
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Pubs and Clubs reopen in OZ :mrgreen:
https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/pubs-clubs-and-restaurants-will-be-allowed-to-seat-up-to-50-patrons-from-june-1-20200522-p54vhg.html

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2020 6:56 am 
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Protestors march through downtown Salem; curfew reinstated until 6 a.m. Monday
Connor Radnovich and Bill Poehler, Salem Statesman Journal Published 9:30 p.m. PT May 31, 2020 | Updated 2:37 a.m. PT June 1, 2020

https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2020/05/31/protestors-march-downtown-salem/5304906002/

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Salem Police officers used tear gas, various projectiles and other devices to disperse protesters on the second evening of marches and demonstrations sparked by the death of George Floyd.

Between six and eight people were arrested late Sunday, most after a group of people surrounded a vehicle driving on Court Street and at least one person jumped on the car's hood.

That incident marked the beginning of the end of four hours of marching, chanting, blocking traffic and clashing with police throughout downtown Salem.

"That was a pretty severe escalation," Salem police spokesman Lt. Treven Upkes said. "Once another person becomes in danger, then we have to act."

City officials also reinstated a curfew that is to stay in effect until 6 a.m. Monday after initially canceling it earlier in the day.

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The marching began shortly after 8:30 p.m. from the Oregon State Capitol Building where at least 250 people had gathered. They carried signs reading: "Black Lives Matter," "No Justice, No Peace," and "Justice for George Floyd."

Their path took them to Front Street, where protesters blocked traffic for several minutes alongside Riverfront Park.

Several vehicles traveling south jumped the median and drove north to avoid the demonstrators.

The group then walked on the road north toward the Marion Street Bridge, taking the on-ramp to the bridge and halting traffic for several minutes.

Upkes said this represented a major confrontation for the city. Blocking traffic on the bridge is a "hard line" for the police, he said.

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They left as police began assembling at the base of the bridge, with a handful of protesters confronting an unhappy driver leaning on her horn and yelling at the marchers.

It escalated to the point of one man striking the passenger side window, though several other protesters were there to pull him away and try to mollify the male passenger.

Several police officers in riot gear appeared, but didn't intervene after the man was pulled away.

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The marchers continued around downtown and eventually returned to the Capitol building, with the crowd by then swelling to at least 400, but it was their eventual return to the base of Marion Street Bridge that sparked direct confrontation with the police.

Upkes said police formed a line in front of the bridge as the protesters went that direction, and during the stand-off some threw glass bottles, rocks and fireworks at officers.

Protesters yelled at their compatriots when fireworks were thrown, some vocally hoping to keep the demonstration peaceful.

Officers returned fire with an assortment of tear gas, pepper balls, rubber projectiles, acoustic devices and spotlights.

Many in the crowd reported getting hit by a projectile or inflicted by tear gas. At least one person appeared to be hit directly by a flashbang grenade.

Upkes said Sunday night's protest was far more confrontational longer than during the previous evening. On Saturday, protesters marched peacefully for three hours before the situation turned violent.

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"This was definitely an escalated situation," Upkes said. "Tonight, this crowd was obviously looking for a confrontation."

Protesters did not disburse after the first several encounters with the police. Officers seemed content to allow them to stay in front of the State Capitol Building or on the Capitol Mall.

However, the group, dwindling in size as the night continued, periodically set off on a march toward downtown, setting off a confrontation with police officers.

Stay on top of all developments. Subscribe to the Statesman Journal and you'll get 24-hour access to stories, photos and videos.

Police specifically did not want protesters to go into the downtown business core, where vandalism such as broken windows was much more likely.

As it was, Upkes said initial reports of vandalism were limited — graffiti on a glass elevator in the Capitol Mall and possibly some broken windows of state buildings.

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PREVIOUS LIVE UPDATES:

UPDATE 12:37 p.m.


Police closed down several streets throughout the night as the protest wound its way through downtown Salem.

A driver, who identified himself as Alex Carter to passersby, was arrested by police at Winter and Union Street after driving in circles in front of the Capitol and at several intersections around downtown.

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A person cleaning up shattered glass in the street in front of Courthouse Square after a group of people jumped on a car was chased, subdued and arrested.

Police riding by on motorcycles shouted at demonstrators, "Curfew is in effect. Go home."

Several scuffles broke out between protesters on the steps of the Capitol as the demonstration was breaking up.

UPDATE 11:30 p.m.

Tear gas has been used as police try to disperse the crowd. One person has been arrested.

UPDATE: 11 p.m.

The number of demonstrators has decreased to about 150. Many walked to the Center Street NE section of the Capitol Mall and knelt down. They stayed there for several minutes and then left.

Police seemed to be regrouping at Riverfront Park.

Original story:

A curfew for the entire city of Salem was reinstated Sunday night and will last until 6 a.m. Monday after at least 300 protestors marched through downtown showing support for George Floyd.

The group marched in the middle of streets and blocked traffic They marched to the Marion Street bridge and briefly marched on the bridge.

Signs proclaiming "Black Lives Matter" and urging support for Floyd are prominently displayed. Demonstrators are chanting: "Say his name: George Floyd."

Some minor confrontations between drivers and marchers have occurred, but many marchers are quickly diffusing those incidents.

Police were monitoring the event from a distance, but have taken more active actions. Several streets in the downtown area have been blocked, noisy 'disruption' sirens have been used and officers are telling demonstrators to go home.

The group started at the state Capitol, marched around downtown and have now mostly returned to the Capitol grounds.

Sunday's demonstration follows a messy incident Saturday night. That march, involving more than 200 demonstrators protesting police brutality and the death of George Floyd, was largely peaceful for several hours. The evening began with a handful of people carrying Black Lives Matter signs standing in the rain on the Capitol steps.

The march, which began at about 7 p.m. Saturday, took a turn after 11 p.m. when projectiles were thrown by individuals in the crowd toward officers near the intersection of Church Street NE and Court Street NE.

Salem police spokesman Lt. Treven Upkes said police broke up the crowd and used tear gas after several explosive devices and hard objects were thrown.

Just after midnight, Upkes warned that another round of tear gas would be used to break up the crowd.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2020 1:31 am 
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Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Locally our black lives matter George Floyd type protests inadvertently breached
the social distancing and number of people at a gathering restrictions under
Covid-19 alert level two.....

Instantly that wily old politician Winston Peters called for police action against all
the people breaching the restrictions or an immediate decrease to alert level one.....

The Prime Minister has already bought the review of the alert level forward to
this coming Monday.....

Our figures remain unchanged, according to the man and by man I mean Jacinda, NZ has:

1,504 coronavirus cases

1,154 confirmed

350 probable

1 Active

22 dead

1,481 recovered

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:47 am 
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^As long as the sheep are distancing all should be ok :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2020 3:18 am 
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:lol: burp! I mean baa baa.....

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2020 6:26 am 
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Demonstrations remain mostly peaceful Monday in Portland to protest death of George Floyd
Updated Jun 02, 2020; Posted Jun 01, 2020

https://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2020/06/portlanders-converge-again-monday-to-protest-death-of-george-floyd-in-minneapolis-police-custody.html

Thousands of demonstrators gathered in Portland for the fifth consecutive night Monday to protest the killing of George Floyd, a black Minneapolis man who died after a white police officer knelt for several minutes on his neck despite his pleas that he could not breathe.

Floyd’s death has triggered protests across the United States. In downtown Portland, peaceful daylight protests have given way to unpredictable, and sometimes destructive, late-night demonstrations. Police have responded at times with shows of support, and at other times, with tear gas and stun grenades to disperse crowds.

The mostly peaceful demonstrations on Monday came as Gov. Kate Brown dispatched dozens of National Guard troops and state police troopers to help Portland police react to the protests. Police Chief Jamie Resch said early Monday morning that officials hadn’t anticipated the scale or the result of the demonstrations, which escalated Friday to wide-scale damages to buildings across much of downtown.

In an effort to stem destruction Monday, police closed off access to several blocks of downtown, from Southwest First to Fifth avenues and Jefferson to Taylor streets, a boundary that encompassed many of the buildings hardest hit during previous days’ demonstrations.

Mayor Ted Wheeler also continued a city-wide curfew of 8 p.m. for the third straight day. Earlier Monday, Wheeler and Oregon’s top federal attorney, Billy Williams, publicly called on Brown to deploy the National Guard troops.

At least three organized protests began to unfold hours later, including one in downtown Portland and another at Southeast Stark Street and 13th Avenue. Police remained largely set apart from protesters early in the night and did not move in after the 8 p.m. curfew passed.

Yet as the crowd pressed toward the fenced-off area minutes later, police warned people to stay away or risk use of force. Together, the crowd repeated, “George Floyd,” then took a knee and chanted, “Hands up, don’t shoot.”

A Portland police officer went out to meet with demonstrators at the latter group’s request, according to police. “We are here to facilitate a safe and peaceful expression of speech,” the officer told the massive crowd, as he spoke into a microphone from behind the fence.

By 11 p.m., five hours after the demonstrations started, the climate remained calm, a stark contrast to the previous three nights.

Police did say, however, that shortly before midnight, a group of people had thrown objects at officers in downtown Portland.

Crowds started to gather throughout Portland around 6 p.m. Hundreds of people streamed into a grass lot where the Stark Street demonstration was held. Mary Gach, 18, a senior at La Salle Catholic Preparatory in Milwaukie stood among those who were gathered. She said she attended to press for criminal justice and policing reforms. She wants white allies, particularly politicians, to push for systemic reforms, as well.

“Black lives matter all the time, not just when our names become hashtags,” she said.

About 150 other people gathered on Southwest First Avenue, near one of the chain link fences that blocked off protesters from access to the Multnomah County Justice Center and many other government buildings. Protesters waved signs and chanted, “What’s his name? George Floyd,” in front of a group of helmeted cops holding the line.

Two Portland police liaisons, wearing street clothes and tactical vests, walked together with Eboni Samuels, 41, to the Salmon Springs Fountain. She addressed the group as the police officers stood beside her. Samuels, who is black, asked the group to remain peaceful and avoid violence.

“They’re here to do what we all want them to do, which is make our city safer for us and for everybody in here, especially, especially, these black lives out here," she said.

Her speech drew an immediate response from Enajah Glass, 18.

"This is a facade,” Glass said of the two officers by Samuels. “We’ve been peaceful for years and what has it got us? You’re glorifying these two police officers.”

The group then began to march along the downtown streets that were not blocked off. Marchers made their way to Pioneer Courthouse Square, where hundreds had gathered by 6:30 p.m. A group of about 1,000 marchers then began walking north together from the square toward Burnside Street.

When marchers reached the Burnside Bridge around 7 p.m., many lay down, with their faces touching the concrete and their hands behind their backs. They stayed that way in silence for nine minutes in memory of Floyd, who was restrained by a police officer on the ground for nearly the same amount of time, as the officer pressed his knee to Floyd’s neck. Monday marked one week since Floyd’s death.

At the demonstration in Southeast Portland, several speakers addressed a growing crowd of hundreds. Many urged protesters to take actions to stop destructive behavior. “If you see something, say something,” one said in relation to broken windows and looting.

The protesters then gathered to walk east toward downtown Portland and started marching shortly after 7 p.m.

As protests continued in the final hour before a citywide curfew, Portland police said protesters Monday evening had remained peaceful, both in Southeast Portland and downtown.

“We support your right to express your opinions,” the bureau tweeted around 7 p.m.

The two marching groups -- which gathered separately in Southeast and Southwest Portland -- converged on the Burnside Bridge around 7:45 p.m. Together, they walked back toward the downtown core as the curfew neared.

After the 8 p.m. curfew passed, neither Portland police nor Wheeler immediately said anything about the thousands of people who remained in downtown past curfew. Around 8 p.m., Portland Police Chief Jami Resch tweeted a link to an Oregonian/OregonLive article about the protest with the hashtag #OneCommunityPDX.

Police officers also remained largely distant from the marchers as they made their way through downtown. Many marchers stopped together at a fence on Fifth Avenue, blocks away from the Justice Center, where they kneeled and chanted, “Hands up, don’t shoot.”

Police tweeted at 8:30 that officers were going to talk with demonstrators, after they said some people in the crowd asked to meet. Protesters listened as the officer talked into the microphone.

The march, which has remained peaceful so far, resumed around 9 p.m. Thousands of people packed into Pioneer Courthouse Square. Some demonstrators stood in front of the historic federal courthouse across the street to keep people away. When one person tried to cut down an American flag flying in the square, people nearby begin booing and yelling at him to stop. The person eventually gave up.

Hundreds of marchers sat on the red bricks in the courthouse square, raised their hands above their heads and chanted, “We want justice.”

Portland police said at 9 p.m. that officers had “not witnessed any vandalism or destruction” related to the protests, which police described as “peaceful” at least eight times throughout the night.

An hour later at 10 p.m., the square remained packed with people. Many began to walk north toward Burnside Street and then turned east, where they started to cross the Burnside Bridge back to the other side of the Willamette River.

By 11 p.m., the flood of people walking east on Burnside off of the bridge stretched three blocks and filled four traffic lanes. Some people eventually returned to the city-owned grass lot on Southeast Stark Street, the site of the earlier demonstration. Others walked away as the group made its way farther east.

Some people in the crowd discussed camping in Stark Street lot overnight, but no tents were set up as of 11:15 p.m. Organizers told the hundreds who remained at 11:30 p.m. to plan to return at 6 p.m. Tuesday to continue the demonstrations.

Meanwhile, shortly before midnight, about 100 protesters were gathered downtown at Southwest Fourth Avenue and Salmon Street, according to police. Some of them began throwing things at officers, including glass bottles and rocks, police said.

One officer suffered minor injuries.

Police told the protesters they were involved in an unlawful assembly and needed to disperse, according to police. They didn’t comply, police said, and officers used unspecified “crowd control munitions” to get them to disperse.

Officers saw several drivers moving through the streets to give protesters supplies and stopped one of them, according to police. But before the officers could detain the driver, she hit multiple cars while trying to get away, police said.

The driver drove away but was eventually arrested, police said. An officer suffered unspecified minor injuries.

Remaining protesters dispersed by 1 a.m. Tuesday.

More than a dozen adults were arrested Monday night into Tuesday morning, police said. Information about those arrested wasn’t immediately available.

Resch, the police chief, thanked the peaceful protesters in a statement early Tuesday.

“Thousands of demonstrators participated in an extensive march without engaging in violence or destructive behavior,” Resch said in the statement. “Thank you for keeping this event peaceful. Your efforts to police the event yourselves created a safer environment for all. We will continue to arrest and hold responsible those who engage in acts of violence directed at the police, community members, or who commit other criminal acts.”

Demonstrations for days have centered on the Justice Center, which houses a county jail and police headquarters. After nearly two days of peaceful protests, the building was the site of a chaotic turn in demonstrations late Friday. Protesters broke into and set a fire inside a first-floor office in the Justice Center.

Hundreds of people then fanned out throughout downtown. Some people smashed windows of retailers, painted graffiti, stole merchandise and clashed at times with police. The tension between demonstrators and police continued Saturday and Sunday.

Police said that early Monday morning, after hours of demonstrations on Sunday, a man called police to say someone had fired a gun at him as he worked to secure his damaged business on Southwest Broadway Street between Taylor and Yamhill Streets. The shopkeeper was not hurt, police said.

The man told police that he had an argument with several men, and believes that one of the men had returned after he told them to leave. Police did not disclose any details about the alleged shooting until more than 16 hours after it occurred.

The governor responded to the mayor’s calls for the National Guard Monday by saying she would activate 50 National Guard troops and send in 100 Oregon State Patrol troopers. The Guard members won’t carry firearms and will provide support to police, help process arrests, move vehicles, protect buildings and provide care to anyone who is injured, the governor said.

The governor said at a press conference later Monday that the lack of police accountability and reforms have led to the unjust killings of Floyd and black people across the country. Only at the end of the conference did she call for peaceful protests, saying that the rioting and looting is the product of a small group of instigators rather than indicative of broader sentiment.

“Senseless violence does not honor George Floyd’s death or create accountability,” Brown said. “Only the hard work of racial justice will.”

The protests of Floyd’s death are not limited in Oregon to Portland. Similar demonstrations have arisen in Salem outside the State Capitol, in Eugene and in Medford

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2020 3:25 am 
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No new cases for the 12th straight day, our figures remain unchanged,
according to the man and by man I mean Jacinda, NZ has:

1,504 coronavirus cases

1,154 confirmed

350 probable

1 Active

22 dead

1,481 recovered

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2020 6:15 am 
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Peace, then conflict during 6th night of protests in Portland over George Floyd death
Updated Jun 03, 2020; Posted Jun 02, 2020

By Jamie Hale | The Oregonian/OregonLive and Jim Ryan | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Portlanders turned out again Tuesday to protest police brutality in light of the death of George Floyd, a black man killed May 25 after a white police officer pressed his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes.

Demonstrations have continued for six consecutive nights in Portland. Thousands of people from two separate events flooded into Pioneer Courthouse Square Tuesday evening. Minutes after they came together, they chanted, “Peaceful protest.”

The Portland protests have ranged every night in scale and tenor, from a mournful gathering of thousands who lay in silence on the Burnside Bridge, to clashes with police met with tear gas and stun grenades. Acts of vandalism broke out after a march Friday and continued at times over the weekend.

Calls for peace took hold Monday. The calm carried over to Tuesday. Speakers called for peace soon after two standalone demonstrations got underway at 6 p.m., and they remained peaceful hours later after the groups had joined in the courthouse square.

Some marchers did eventually make their way to a fence blocking off a large section of downtown from protesters. Police warned people to stop shaking the fence or face force against them. As standoffs escalated at different points near the fence, police used stun grenades and tear gas to try to split up the crowds. The tense scene repeated on and off until midnight, when demonstrators started to spread throughout downtown.

Before people marched to the barricade, police had remained almost entirely out of sight. Police leaders prepared Tuesday for the continued protests by meeting with some organizers and African American community leaders. Officers also shut down the Hawthorne Bridge to traffic going into downtown.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler acknowledged at a Tuesday morning press conference that the protests had become more peaceful. He opted not to extend the city-wide curfew for a fourth night. He called the change toward peace a “significant shift.”

“What we are witnessing is a truly extraordinary moment in history,” he said. “People coming together, united, to support our black community in ways that we have never seen before.”

Protests took place throughout Portland Tuesday evening, including at Pioneer Courthouse Square, where hundreds of people had assembled by 6 p.m.

A group of people who work in the medical field, many wearing white coats or scrubs, led the crowd by kneeling and raising their right fists in the air. Some demonstrators carried signs that said, “White Coats for Black Lives."

Kelley Butler, a medical student who attends University of California-Irvine Medical Center, said the group knelt for nine minutes — roughly the same amount of time that Floyd was restrained with the officer’s knee to his neck — as a representation of the pain that black people experience every day.

“This should be the beginning, or the start, of continued conversations, actions and thought," Butler said.

A second, larger gathering began in Southeast Portland at a city-owned green space on Stark Street near 12th Avenue. It is the same place where a demonstration began and ended Monday. An event flyer on social media advertised the gathering as a peaceful protest led by black organizers.

An estimated 2,000 people, and Caesar the No Drama Llama, had arrived by 6 p.m. The crowd shouted George Floyd’s name in unison and planned to march after a speech.

By 6:30, the crowd had grown by thousands. A speaker told the group the demonstrators were gathered to show police and the world that they are above violence.

“This protest is not about violence," the person said. "This is a 100 percent peaceful protest.”

The crowd gathered on Stark Street soon made its way west toward Pioneer Courthouse Square.

Portland police tweeted around 6:40 p.m. that they appreciated demonstrators staying peaceful.

“It’s a beautiful evening, and we are pleased all those who came out are able to express their First Amendment rights,” the police bureau said.

By 7:15 p.m., marchers had made their way from Stark Street to the Burnside Bridge. As they walked, they let TriMet buses through. When the group made it to the bridge, they paused and lay down with their hands behind their backs, symbolizing the restraint of Floyd that led to his death.

Meanwhile, a crowd of hundreds remained near Pioneer Courthouse Square. Several people addressed those gathered and asked protesters to remain peaceful.

Myke Tavarres, a former NFL and Lakeridge High School football player, said protests that escalate to violence distract from the loss of life that people had gathered to protest.

“Portland has been doing an amazing job to stay peaceful in this protest," Tavarres said. "A lot of times when we riot, we march — the violence that’s left over, that’s what they talk about.”

Just before 8 p.m., the marchers converged with the Pioneer Courthouse Square crowd. The combined group numbered several thousand people.

As the massive protest entered its third hour, police appeared to be tracking it, tweeting out marchers’ locations periodically and alerting drivers to use caution in those areas. But reporters at the scene said they had not seen a single uniformed officer the entire evening.

Thousands of people remained in Pioneer Courthouse Square for at least an hour. The group often chanted, “Black lives matter.”

Around 9 p.m., a group of protesters started to march toward a fence that blocked people from a large section of the downtown core, including City Hall, the downtown jail and police headquarters, and the county and federal courthouses.

As protesters and police squared off, police warned people to stop shaking the fence or they may use may use force against them. As standoffs escalated at different points along the fence, police used stun grenades and tear gas to try to split up the crowds.

Some people responded by throwing objects and fireworks toward police along the fence.

Portland police tweeted that the crowd was not associated with the huge group that had been at Pioneer Square for hours. The police bureau declared the gatherings near the fence an unlawful assembly. Police said on Twitter that some people had thrown bottles, fireworks, mortars and bats at officers.

At 9:30 p.m. hundreds of people remained near the fenced-off areas as police wearing riot gear continued to arrive. The crowd was significantly smaller than the group in Pioneer Square.

The climate remained tense around 10 p.m. Hundreds of people gathered at Southwest Third Avenue and Taylor Street shouted in unison, “Portland cops kill.” One block west, police again set off stun grenades and tear gas.

The Portland police sound truck told the crowd that it was an unlawful assembly and threatened to use force if protesters did not leave the area. The crowd split, then reassembled into several smaller groups that began moving throughout downtown.

As the chaotic scene played out, a crowd of thousands began to leave Pioneer Courthouse Square, where a peaceful protest had continued, to march back east over the Burnside Bridge.

Chief Jami Resch posted a video message at 10:20 p.m., saying that most of the protests had been peaceful and that police were hearing protesters’ messages. She addressed what had happened when protesters pressed toward the police barricade.

She said a group of several hundred broke off from the main demonstration and approached the perimeter of the justice center, trying to break the fencing around the building and throwing items at police. Resch said police warned protesters that they would use force if they didn’t stop. Police then sprayed tear gas and threw flash-bangs at the crowd of protesters.

Shortly before 10:30 p.m., police tweeted that anyone who remained in the downtown core should leave immediately “due to the criminal activity and unlawful assembly."

Yet a crowd of hundreds of people continued to grow in Pioneer Courthouse Square. Around 11 p.m., several hundred people then began to march from there toward the fence along Southwest Fourth Avenue and Salmon Street.

A separate and larger group returned to the site of the day’s earlier protest in Southeast Portland. They chanted, “Black lives matter,” and raised their fists in unison before a speaker urged them to call elected officials and demand change.

The group made plans to meet again Wednesday at the same place. “Tonight y’all can sleep, but best believe we will be back tomorrow,” the speaker said.

The protest kept going, though, downtown. Around 11:30 p.m., officers set off tear gas and stun grenades toward the crowd gathered on Fourth Avenue after the police bureau tweeted that people were throwing things at them from a nearby parking garage.

“This is very dangerous for all,” the bureau tweeted.

Police said that they may start using rubber bullets if the crowd did not break up. People left the area in different directions, and small groups of people continued to face off with police.

The pattern of confrontations repeated what happened Monday, when a small faction broke off from the large protest and confronted police. Police said a small group of people confronted them in downtown Portland overnight Monday, and they ultimately detained 16 people overnight Monday. They have not yet said how many people they arrested Tuesday. Portland said they had made “multiple” arrests by midnight.

Police also have not said they will leave up the barricade around parts of downtown Portland or block the Hawthorne Bridge to westbound traffic.

Mike Pullen, a Multnomah County spokesperson, said police have the authority to close any road or bridge in Portland. Pullen said they did so because there had been traffic jams on the bridge in the past few days, making it difficult for police to cross the bridge to the west side. Traffic from the bridge comes out near police headquarters and the county jail, which had been targeted by vandalism in previous days.

Pullen said police occasionally close bridges for crowd control purposes, but it’s unusual for one to be closed indefinitely. Police have said the bridge will open “when security conditions improve and the cordoned area of downtown reopens.”

Brooke Herbert, Sean Meagher, Celina Tebor, Alex Hardgrave, Jayati Ramakrishnan, K. Rambo, Kale Williams and Maxine Bernstein of The Oregonian/OregonLive contributed to this report, which will be updated throughout the night.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2020 10:31 am 
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So far 8 mink farms in Brabant, my province of The Netherlands, have suffered Corona contamination. Two people have been confirmed to be contaminated by the minks.

Since mink farms were due to be forbidden in 2024 and the public health risk is deemed too big, all 8 farms will have all animals killed and disposed of.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2020 12:34 pm 
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MonoNeon Releases New Song, "BREATHING WHILE BLACK"

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 2:03 am 
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One of the few people I despise more than Piers Morgan is Rudi Giulliani. The latter manages the astounding feat of making the former look almost reasonable here...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OeskboFUcA

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 10:51 am 
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Caputh wrote:
One of the few people I despise more than Piers Morgan is Rudi Giulliani. The latter manages the astounding feat of making the former look almost reasonable here...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OeskboFUcA


Dam that video is already gone... :shock:


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 11:28 pm 
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Plook wrote:
Caputh wrote:
One of the few people I despise more than Piers Morgan is Rudi Giulliani. The latter manages the astounding feat of making the former look almost reasonable here...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OeskboFUcA


Dam that video is already gone... :shock:


Here's another link - in better quality...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j17XLCh1w-Q
Although you do miss Rudi apparently telling Piers that he "fucked up".

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Last edited by Caputh on Thu Jun 04, 2020 11:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 11:29 pm 
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Plook wrote:
Caputh wrote:
One of the few people I despise more than Piers Morgan is Rudi Giulliani. The latter manages the astounding feat of making the former look almost reasonable here...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OeskboFUcA


Dam that video is already gone... :shock:


Faster than a speeding subsidy cheque.....

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2020 11:48 pm 
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BBP wrote:
So far 8 mink farms in Brabant, my province of The Netherlands, have suffered Corona contamination. Two people have been confirmed to be contaminated by the minks.

Since mink farms were due to be forbidden in 2024 and the public health risk is deemed too big, all 8 farms will have all animals killed and disposed of.


I was surprised to read about this, I hadn't really thought about mink as having diseases,
somewhere in the back of my mind I was aware of mink farming and some animal rights
anti fur stuff but I wasn't aware mink could be infectious in any way.....

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:57 am 
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The slaughter of the minks...

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