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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 4:02 am 
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Astronomers discover 12 more moons of Jupiter, including an oddity
BEN GUARINO
Last updated 08:53, July 18 2018

Our solar system's oldest and biggest planet, Jupiter, has many moons. And astronomers have just announced the discovery of a dozen more.

On Tuesday, the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center published the orbits for 12 newfound Jovian moons - bringing Jupiter's total to 79 moons, said Scott Sheppard, a scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in the United States.

Sheppard did not set out to detect new moons. His team at Carnegie, along with collaborators at the University of Hawaii and Northern Arizona University, was hunting for objects far beyond Pluto.

"We're looking for new possible planets and dwarf planets in our solar system, just seeing what is out there," Sheppard said.

But cosmic serendipity placed the moons in front of their telescope. During their survey in March 2017, the astronomers realised that Jupiter had moved into their field of view.

The Blanco four-metre telescope, at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, is equipped with a camera able to spot very faint objects. This proved to be quite helpful, as the unknown moons around Jupiter are small and dim.

"We were able to go a little bit fainter than anyone has been able to go in the past," Sheppard said, "and that's why we were able to find these new moons."

Jupiter's moons range in size from shrimpy satellites to whopping space hulks.

Galileo discovered the first four of Jupiter's moons, all huge, in 1610. The largest Galilean moon, Ganymede, is bigger than the planet Mercury. Those moons orbit close to Jupiter and travel in the same direction as the planet spins.

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NASA
Jupiter has 79 moons, the most of any planet.

The moons Sheppard spied are farther-flung and tiny, each no more than two miles in diameter. One moon detected by Sheppard and his colleagues is the smallest Jovian moon ever discovered. They named it Valetudo, after a daughter of Jupiter and the Roman goddess of hygiene and personal health.

Gareth Williams, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and director at the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center, predicted that "there aren't any bigger objects undiscovered out there" around Jupiter.

But he said he expects astronomers will discover more tiny moons in the coming decades. As for the number of satellites that orbit Jupiter, Williams said he dreads "to think how many objects are in the hundred-metre range."

Size isn't a requirement to be a moon - there's no such thing as a dwarf moon. Not yet, anyway.

"Right now the only definition of a moon is something that orbits the planet," Sheppard said, as long as it isn't human-made.

Astronomers group Jupiter's moons by their distance from the planet as well as their orbital direction. If a moon circles in the same direction as a planet's rotation, that moon's orbit is called prograde. If moon circles a planet in the opposite direction of a rotating planet, that orbit is retrograde. (A small subset of Jupiter's 79 moons do not have well-known orbits.)

Most moons, including Earth's, have prograde orbits. Two of the newly discovered moons, the ones closest to Jupiter, have prograde orbits, too.

The other nine moons, grouped in clusters of three, have retrograde orbits. Those moons were probably once part of much larger moons that splintered into smaller objects, Sheppard said. The astronomers are currently running computer simulations to determine how the ancient moons fragmented.

Valetudo is something of an oddball. It has a prograde orbit at a distance where the rest of Jupiter's moons have retrograde orbits. What's more, those orbits intersect. The stage is set, in other words, for possible moon-moon collisions.

The astronomers do not know the composition of the dozen newly identified moons. They could be rock, ice or a mixture.

"The only thing that we know at the moment are the orbits and the approximate size," Williams said. "We know nothing, really, more than that."

The realm of the giant planets - between Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune - is largely devoid of small objects. When those planets formed, their gravity vacuumed up nearby gas, rocks and other debris. This matter became part of the planets themselves.

But Sheppard suspects these moons could be holdouts, the "last remnants" of early solar system objects. "By looking at these outer moons," he said, "we can get an insight into what the objects were like that ended up forming the planets we see today."

- The Washington Post

https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/105563474 ... -an-oddity

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2018 7:28 pm 
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Extremely rare 'selenelion' in South Island skies this weekend

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The south of New Zealand will witness an extremely rare celestial event this weekend.

A few minutes after 8am on Saturday, South Islanders can observe a total lunar eclipse where the Sun and Moon are both visible, which is known as a 'selenelion'.

While you mightn't have heard of it, a selenelion is a must-see occurrence. The areas of our planet from which it can be experienced are very limited, because the total lunar eclipse must be on-going at the time of moonset/sunrise.

The first record of any such event dates from 1666.

A selenelion happens when the eclipsed Moon can be seen on one horizon, whilst the rising Sun can also be observed near the opposite horizon, explains Dr Duncan Steel from the Centre for Space Science Technology in Otago.

This might seem impossible - as a typical lunar eclipse happens when the Sun, Earth and Moon are in a straight line - so if the Moon is above the horizon then the Sun must be below it.

But the selenelion is possible due to the bending of the rays of light caused by Earth's atmosphere, says Dr Steel. This enables you to see both the eclipsed Moon and the Sun at the same time, so long as you're in the right place.

Where can you witness it?

The best chance of witnessing the eclipse this weekend is if you're in the South Island.

Dr Steel explains that in the hell hole that is Auckland the eclipse is still partial, as the Moon disappears below the horizon, while from Whanganui to Wellington, there is only a slim chance of seeing the totally-eclipsed Moon as the Sun peeks above the horizon.

The South Island is the best place to see it.

In Invercargill, there is five minutes between sunrise at 8:12am and moonset shortly thereafter, with the Moon entirely within Earth's shadow. In Dunedin, the interval is reduced to four minutes and in Christchurch three minutes.

What will it look like?

If you're lucky enough to catch a glimpse of the eclipse, the Moon will appear much fainter than it usually does, and will look a bit darker with a reddish tinge, Dr Steel says.

The reason for this is sunlight leaking through Earth's atmosphere and reaching the Moon, with red light standing a better chance of doing so than other colours.

Dr Steel says the event is "quite rare". Although there is a lunar eclipse visible from New Zealand every few years, very few people have witnessed a selenelion.

"Being located in the right place to see a celestial peculiarity like a selenelion is much less frequent, and very few people have witnessed one," he says.

http://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/national/ ... ocid=ientp

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2018 4:34 pm 
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punknaynowned wrote:
Underground Lake Found On Mars by Italian Radar MARSIS

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Stephane Peray
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Stephane Peray
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 11:34 pm 
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Pyramid-sized asteroid to fly by Earth
08:21, Aug 28 2018

An asteroid as big as the Great Pyramid will pass by Earth on Wednesday doing 32,400kmh (20,132mph).

Asteroid 2016 NF23 will be at its closest - about 5 million kilometres away - about 3.30pm.

Nasa has given an assurance it poses no risk to the planet despite designating it as a "potentially hazardous object" or PHA - which was triggered when a space object got within 8 million kilometres to Earth.

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SUPPLIED
Nasa estimates the asteroid is between 70 - 160 metres in diameter. At the larger end of that range it would be bigger than the Great Pyramid of Giza. (File image)

Nasa estimates the asteroid is between 70 - 160 metres in diameter. At the larger end of that range it would be bigger than the Great Pyramid of Giza.

Space objects have passed a lot closer to Earth than Asteroid 2016 NF23 - a much smaller asteroid, 2012 TC4, flew by at a distance of just 42,000km in October 2017.

Image
NASA/JPL
Asteroid 2016 NF23 will be at its closest - about 5 million kilometres away - about 3.30pm on August 29 (bottom right).

Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/science/1066144 ... y-by-earth

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:45 am 
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Would they tell us if we were going to get hit, I'm not sure that any Government would be forthcoming since some wide spread panic would probably ensue... :smoke:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:46 am 
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^Can I hide in your basement? I'll bring my DZ concert boots.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:02 pm 
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I'll bring my Aunty Jack Amp (30watt Lanely tube jobbie) it gotta be saved :smoke:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:16 pm 
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Pretty sure there's no Trump's allowed.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:37 pm 
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coevad wrote:
Pretty sure there's no Trump's allowed.


:oops: :oops:

Even in a wet Tee Shirt?


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 2:54 pm 
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Ok. You have my vote.

We may want to fondue you, though.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 2:55 pm 
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In light of a Turkish Lamp... :mrgreen:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 12:14 am 
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I'm on my way.....I like a good fondue

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 1:19 am 
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Gray_Ghost wrote:
I'm on my way.....I like a good fondue


Your on, i promise not to bring Donald :mrgreen:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 9:09 am 
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Meanwhile, back on Uranus...

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 10:51 am 
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Di I just fart of something, maybe it was a quiff


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 3:32 pm 
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New Horizons Just Found Hints of a Huge Structure at The Edge of Our Solar System

https://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-new-horizons-probe-detects-ultraviolet-neutral-hydrogen-wall-solar-system-heliopause

BY MICHELLE STARR
AUGUST 15, 2018
Way out past Pluto, in the region of asteroid-filled space known as the Kuiper belt, NASA probe New Horizons just got a tantalising hint of a long-sought structure in the outer Solar System.

An ultraviolet glow picked up by the probe's Alice UV spectrometer could be evidence of the 'hydrogen wall', a region of dense hydrogen on the boundary between the Solar System and interstellar space.
"We're seeing the threshold between being in the solar neighborhood and being in the galaxy," astronomer Leslie Young of the Southwest Research Institute and New Horizons team told Science News.
Although space has extremely low pressure, it still exists, and the solar wind exerts an outward pressure. At a certain point, however, that wind is no longer strong enough to push back against interstellar space.
This boundary is known as the heliopause, which marks the official edge of the Solar System.
Just on the other side of the heliopause, neutral hydrogen atoms moving through interstellar space should, theoretically, slow down when they reach that barrier - a sort of neutral hydrogen "traffic jam" that causes a buildup next to the heliopause.
Between 2007 and 2017, New Horizons detected a distinctive ultraviolet glow called the Lyman-alpha line, produced by solar photons hitting the hydrogen atoms and scattering.

This occurs as sunlight travels through the Solar System. But there's a mysterious background source in the signal detected by New Horizons, much farther away.
This was also detected by Voyager 30 years ago. New Horizons is the first probe in all that time that has had the same opportunity to take measurements of this phenomenon - and its best explanation is the hydrogen wall.
"Both sets of data are best explained if the observed ultraviolet light is not only a result of the scattering of sunlight by hydrogen atoms within the solar system, but includes a substantial contribution from a distant source," the researchers wrote in their paper.
"This distant source could be the signature of a wall of hydrogen, formed near where the interstellar wind encounters the solar wind."
The background glow could be something else, farther away out there in space; the only way to be sure is to do more sciencing. Which means more Alice observations with New Horizons - around twice a year for the foreseeable future, according to the paper.

Voyager 1 has already moved on into interstellar space. It breached the heliopause in 2013, and is still beaming signals back to Earth as it moves farther and farther away into the infinite cosmos.
Voyager 2 is in the heliosheath, the outer reaches of the Solar System where the solar wind is slowed by interstellar gas. It's expected to cross the heliopause sometime before 2030.
New Horizons won't reach that point until sometime after, but if it's still in operation, it may be able to take more observations as it glides through. Which is quite a comforting thought, really: humans may come and go, but our scientific efforts live on.
In the meantime, New Horizons has other work to do. It's already dished the dirt on Pluto, which it flew past in 2015.
The probe's next encounter will be with a Kuiper belt object named Ultima Thule, a minor planet the probe will explore on 1 January 2019.
The team's research has been published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters .


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:15 pm 
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maybe that quiff pushed that gas to the edge of the solar system... :mrgreen:

BTW did that asteroid hit the earth yet... :shock:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:42 pm 
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cory1984 wrote:
New Horizons Just Found Hints of a Huge Structure at The Edge of Our Solar System

https://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-new-horizons-probe-detects-ultraviolet-neutral-hydrogen-wall-solar-system-heliopause



BY MICHELLE STARR
AUGUST 15, 2018
Way out past Pluto, in the region of asteroid-filled space known as the Kuiper belt, NASA probe New Horizons just got a tantalising hint of a long-sought structure in the outer Solar System.

An ultraviolet glow picked up by the probe's Alice UV spectrometer could be evidence of the 'hydrogen wall', a region of dense hydrogen on the boundary between the Solar System and interstellar space.
"We're seeing the threshold between being in the solar neighborhood and being in the galaxy," astronomer Leslie Young of the Southwest Research Institute and New Horizons team told Science News.
Although space has extremely low pressure, it still exists, and the solar wind exerts an outward pressure. At a certain point, however, that wind is no longer strong enough to push back against interstellar space.
This boundary is known as the heliopause, which marks the official edge of the Solar System.
Just on the other side of the heliopause, neutral hydrogen atoms moving through interstellar space should, theoretically, slow down when they reach that barrier - a sort of neutral hydrogen "traffic jam" that causes a buildup next to the heliopause.
Between 2007 and 2017, New Horizons detected a distinctive ultraviolet glow called the Lyman-alpha line, produced by solar photons hitting the hydrogen atoms and scattering.

This occurs as sunlight travels through the Solar System. But there's a mysterious background source in the signal detected by New Horizons, much farther away.
This was also detected by Voyager 30 years ago. New Horizons is the first probe in all that time that has had the same opportunity to take measurements of this phenomenon - and its best explanation is the hydrogen wall.
"Both sets of data are best explained if the observed ultraviolet light is not only a result of the scattering of sunlight by hydrogen atoms within the solar system, but includes a substantial contribution from a distant source," the researchers wrote in their paper.
"This distant source could be the signature of a wall of hydrogen, formed near where the interstellar wind encounters the solar wind."
The background glow could be something else, farther away out there in space; the only way to be sure is to do more sciencing. Which means more Alice observations with New Horizons - around twice a year for the foreseeable future, according to the paper.

Voyager 1 has already moved on into interstellar space. It breached the heliopause in 2013, and is still beaming signals back to Earth as it moves farther and farther away into the infinite cosmos.
Voyager 2 is in the heliosheath, the outer reaches of the Solar System where the solar wind is slowed by interstellar gas. It's expected to cross the heliopause sometime before 2030.
New Horizons won't reach that point until sometime after, but if it's still in operation, it may be able to take more observations as it glides through. Which is quite a comforting thought, really: humans may come and go, but our scientific efforts live on.
In the meantime, New Horizons has other work to do. It's already dished the dirt on Pluto, which it flew past in 2015.
The probe's next encounter will be with a Kuiper belt object named Ultima Thule, a minor planet the probe will explore on 1 January 2019.
The team's research has been published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters .


Thanks Cory.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 5:23 pm 
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No problem coevad, here's more on the New Horizons spacecraft:

NASA’s Pluto probe spots the next deep space rock it’s zooming toward
New Horizons sees you, Ultima Thule
By Loren Grush on August 29, 2018 12:48 pm

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, known for flying by Pluto in 2015, has finally spotted its next target at the edge of the Solar System. On August 16th, the distant probe captured its first images of the space rock it’s currently zooming toward — an icy body nearly 20 miles across that’s been nicknamed Ultima Thule. It’s a major milestone for the New Horizons team as they prepare the spacecraft for its rendezvous with Ultima Thule on New Year’s Day 2019.


The New Horizons spacecraft has been en route to Ultima Thule ever since October 2015, just a few months after it flew by Pluto in July. Following the Pluto meet-up, NASA decided to extend the New Horizons mission so that the vehicle would fly by another target in the distant Solar System. The mission team selected Ultima Thule, also named 2014 MU69, since it’s in an ideal position beyond Pluto, and it didn’t take too much fuel for New Horizons to change course to meet up with the rock.

NEW HORIZONS SPACECRAFT HAS BEEN EN ROUTE TO ULTIMA THULE EVER SINCE OCTOBER 2015

Planetary scientists are especially eager for the spacecraft to visit Ultima Thule since it’s an object in the Kuiper Belt — the huge cloud of icy rocks that orbits beyond Neptune. Scientists believe that objects in the Kuiper Belt haven’t changed very much since the birth of the Solar System. So these bodies are considered very primitive and could tell us more about what the early days of our cosmic neighborhood were like. Plus, we’ve never visited one of these objects before, so no one truly knows what to expect.

Up until now, scientists have only been able to image Ultima Thule directly using the Hubble Space Telescope. And the images haven’t been that great since the icy body is small and orbits approximately 4 billion miles from Earth. To get a better understanding of what Ultima Thule looks like, the New Horizons team has also tried spotting the rock a few times from Earth as it passed in front of distant stars, blocking out their light. These eclipsing events, known as occultations, have allowed the mission scientists to better understand the true shape and size of the object. It turns out that Ultima Thule may be pretty weird, too. The rock is either oddly shaped, like two meatballs stuck together, or it’s not one rock but rather two boulders closely orbiting around each other.

“IT REALLY IS LIKE FINDING A NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK.”

We still don’t know for sure, and the new images from New Horizons don’t give us much more clarity. Right now, Ultima Thule still appears as just a light speck in the New Horizons images, since the vehicle is about 100 million miles away from the object. The rock is also particularly hard to find as Ultima Thule was photographed against an incredibly bright field of stars, making it hard to see the faint, tiny object.
“It really is like finding a needle in a haystack,” Hal Weaver, a New Horizons project scientist, said in a statement. “In these first images, Ultima appears only as a bump on the side of a background star that’s roughly 17 times brighter, but Ultima will be getting brighter – and easier to see – as the spacecraft gets closer.”

New Horizons is currently hurtling toward Ultima Thule at a speed of more than 31,000 miles per hour, and it’s scheduled to fly by the rock at 12:33AM ET on January 1st, 2019. The spacecraft will continue to take pictures of the object until then, which will help the mission team refine the vehicle’s trajectory. But just seeing Ultima Thule now, even as a blurry speck, is good news because it means that the object was right where scientists expected it to be.

The New Horizons images were taken around the same time that another NASA spacecraft, OSIRIS-REx, also spotted its celestial target for the first time. That vehicle is currently on its way to an asteroid named Bennu in order to grab a sample from the rock’s surface and bring it back to Earth. OSIRIS-REx also has a big milestone coming up around the same time as the Ultima Thule flyby: on December 31st, OSIRIS-REx will insert itself into orbit around Bennu, which will be the start of a year-long mapping campaign to figure out the best place to grab a sample from the asteroid’s surface.


Just four months remain until New Horizons and OSIRIS-REx get up-close views of their deep space destinations. NASA will have a lot of missions to help ring in the new year.


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 6:32 pm 
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New Horizons Just Sent Back The First Images of The Mysterious Object It'll Reach on New Years

BY MATT WILLIAMS, THE UNIVERSE TODAY
AUGUST 31, 2018
In July of 2015, NASA's New Horizons mission made history when it became the first spacecraft to conduct a flyby of Pluto.

Since that time, the spacecraft's mission was extended so it could make its way farther into the outer Solar System and become the first spacecraft to explore some Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs).

It's first objective will be the KBO known as 2014 MU69, which was recently given the nickname Ultima Thule ("ultima thoo-lee").

Earlier this month (on August 16th), the New Horizons spacecraft managed to capture an image of Ultima Thule for the first time using its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI).

This came as a bit of a surprise to the mission team, given that the object is still 172 million kilometres (107 million miles) away and against a dense background of stars. At its current speed, New Horizons will rendezvous with the object on New Year's Day, 2019.

First views of Ultima Thule (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)
The image was the composite of 48 images taken by the team in their first attempt to find Ultima Thule (left) and a magnified view (right) of the region in the yellow box taken by LORRI. These images were transmitted back to Earth using NASA's Deep Space Network over the next few days.
After subtracting the light of the background stars, they were able to see light reflected from Ultima Thule – a KBO which orbits our Sun at a distance of roughly 6.5 billion kilometres (4 billion miles).

As Hal Weaver, the New Horizons project scientist and LORRI principal investigator from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL), explained in a recent NASA press release:

"The image field is extremely rich with background stars, which makes it difficult to detect faint objects. It really is like finding a needle in a haystack.
In these first images, Ultima appears only as a bump on the side of a background star that's roughly 17 times brighter, but Ultima will be getting brighter – and easier to see – as the spacecraft gets closer."


This first detection is important because observations conducted by New Horizons over the next four months will help the mission team refine the spacecraft's course towards Ultima.

It also indicated that the team already has a good idea of Ultima's orbit since the KBO was precisely where the mission scientists predicted it would be (using data gathered by the Hubble Space Telescope).

When the New Horizons mission reaches Ultima, it will be the first time any spacecraft has explored a small object in the Kuiper Belt and will also be the farthest exploration of any body in the Solar System in history.

New Horizons already set that record back in July of 2015 when it made its flyby of Pluto, exceeding the previous record by about 1.6 billion km (1 billion miles).
Speaking of breaking records, these images also broke the previous two records for the most distant image ever taken.
Back in December of 2017, New Horizons had already broken that record when it took pictures of the "Wishing Well" star cluster at a distance of 6.12 billion kilometres (3.79 billion miles).

This exceeded the record-setting "Pale Blue Dot" image taken by the Voyager 1 probe in 1990 – at a distance of 6.06 billion kilometres (3.75 billion miles).
As Alan Stern, New Horizons Principal Investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, declared:

"Our team worked hard to determine if Ultima was detected by LORRI at such a great distance, and the result is a clear yes. We now have Ultima in our sights from much farther out than once thought possible. We are on Ultima's doorstep, and an amazing exploration awaits!"

The New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to make its historic rendezvous with Ultima at 04:33 UTC on 1 January 2019. The data it gathers on this KBO will also tell scientists a great deal about the formation and early history of the Solar System.

Just four months to go, and we will be witnessing history in the making!

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 7:00 am 
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Plook wrote:
maybe that quiff pushed that gas to the edge of the solar system... :mrgreen:

BTW did that asteroid hit the earth yet... :shock:


I've just checked.....we're ok!

Imagine the super computers exploding their collective data caps and the deafening shouts of more sciencing more sciencing echoing through the halls of academia if the New Horizons spacecraft had bounced off the hydrogen wall and began returning to Earth.....

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 1:21 pm 
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Gray_Ghost wrote:
Plook wrote:
maybe that quiff pushed that gas to the edge of the solar system... :mrgreen:

BTW did that asteroid hit the earth yet... :shock:


I've just checked.....we're ok!

Imagine the super computers exploding their collective data caps and the deafening shouts of more sciencing more sciencing echoing through the halls of academia if the New Horizons spacecraft had bounced off the hydrogen wall and began returning to Earth.....


I'll let Donald know he can come out of his bunker now


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 3:21 pm 
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This week on the International Space Station, alarms alerted the occupants of an air leak. They quickly narrowed down the problem to one of the Soyuz capsules docked at the station (ironically, these capsules are meant to act as lifeboats if there is a problem with the station and the astronauts need to abandon ship).

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst found the hole in the capsule's skin, and plugged it temporarily with his finger. Then he took this picture of the hole:
Image

Ultimately, they finished the repair with glue and - of course - duct tape.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:04 am 
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Location: in the tiny dirt somewhere
Update on the space station leak:

Turns out it wasn't caused by a meteorite after all. It was caused by a drill, during manufacturing process. Rather than report it, the worker who caused the hole apparently tried to fix the problem himself.

So - quite literally - it was a failed coverup...

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 1:02 pm 
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When I fix stuff at home he gets ANGRY. He does not understand the power of Liquid Nails and Duct tape...........

Proof now that my methods works- from NASA (do you think I should point this out to Donald ;D)


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