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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:09 am 
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baddy wrote:
Plook wrote:
I want some of this stuff explained, to my satisfaction:

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These are red arrows :)
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This is a temporary lane divider left over from canal construction.
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This is two pictures of the same thing.
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This is a Martian rock lizard tryin' to get a 69 goin' with another Martian rock lizard :)
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:)


ah sorry I littered


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:54 am 
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Some of the photo analysis by online investigators seems a little over the top, but for the most part Mars seems to be littered with debris from an ancient civilization that was destroyed in a cataclysmic disaster... :idea:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:22 pm 
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Nixon's 18 minutes.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:44 pm 
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Mr. D J Trump's tax return(s)

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:02 pm 
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DB Cooper.

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 10:55 pm 
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^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Plook in shorts and under the right light.....DB Cooper ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:23 pm 
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NASA'a Curiosity rover is currently hunkered down in low-power mode while it weathers a huge Martian dust storm. But it was able to take and transmit this selfie (which is actually a composite of several photographs):
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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:49 pm 
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Notice how clear the freaking photos are when there isn't any ancient alien stuff laying around and who wouldn't pull right up to the thing in the last two photos in my above post that looks mechanical as all hell...all of you would have drove that freaking rover right up to that thing to get a good look, NASA bales out in the opposite direction as quick as possible, then come back two weeks later (Sol 51 & Sol 64) and take another crappy picture from to far away... :?


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 8:02 pm 
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New picture from the Juno orbiter shows the turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere:
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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 11:09 pm 
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Mars will come closer to Earth in the coming weeks than it has been in 15 years

JEREMY BERKE
Last updated 17:10, June 18th, 2018
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NASA
The planet Mars is shown in this Nasa Hubble space telescope view taken May 2016 when it was 80 million kilometres from Earth. In July it will be only 57 million km away.

Mars will look brighter in the night sky over the next six weeks than it has appeared in 15 years.

That's because the red planet will be at its closest point to Earth since 2003 throughout June and July, as our planet passes between Mars and the sun.

On July 31, when Mars will be at its brightest, it will be 57.6 million kilometres away from Earth, according to The Weather Channel.
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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS via AP
This composite image made from a series of January 2018 photos shows a self-portrait of Nasa's Curiosity Mars rover on Vera Rubin Ridge. The Curiosity rover runs on nuclear power and is located in an area of Mars that has been less affected by the dust storm that is currently walloping Mars.

Mars will be easily visible to the naked eye throughout July, outshining all but the brightest stars as it gets to its closest point.

The reason for this is a phenomenon called perihelic opposition. In simple terms, opposition is when Earth passes directly between Mars and the sun. Last month, Jupiter was in opposition to our planet, swinging within 658 million km of Earth.
Image
NASA/JPL-Caltech/TAMU
Simulated images show what Nasa’s Opportunity rover saw as a global dust storm on Mars blotted out the sun in June 2018.

Mars opposition happens every two years or so – the last one came in May 2016. But this year is special because within a few weeks of the opposition, the red planet will also hit its closest point to the sun in its orbit, a point called the perihelion.

Perihelic opposition occurs only once every 15 to 17 years, when Earth's and Mars' orbits align to bring the two planets close together, according to Nasa.

But while Mars may look bright and beautiful from your backyard, the reality on the planet is much less friendly. A dust storm is currently walloping Mars, covering around 10 billion acres of the red planet's surface. That's an area equivalent to the size of North America and Russia, and it takes up a quarter of Mars' surface area.

"The storm is one of the most intense ever observed on the Red Planet," Nasa said in a press release.

Nasa put its solar-powered Opportunity rover in sleep mode to ride out the storm, but its unclear whether the ageing rover will be able to function again after the storm ends.

The image below shows a series of pictures that Nasa simulated from the perspective of the Opportunity rover. They give a sense of what the sun and sky have looked like from Mars' surface – at the brightest time of the day – as the storm has worsened. In the far-right picture, the sun is entirely blotted out to Opportunity.

Nasa's newer Curiosity rover runs on nuclear power and is located in an area of Mars that has been less affected by the dust storm, so it seems to be doing fine.

The animation below shows the dust storm spreading (it's that orangeish blob), with the locations of the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers labelled.

Animation here :arrow: https://giant.gfycat.com/SaneQuaintBlackmamba.mp4

This story fist appeared in BusinessInsider.com au

- BusinessInsider.com.au

https://www.stuff.co.nz/science/1048005 ... n-15-years

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 12:28 am 
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Gray_Ghost wrote:
Mars will come closer to Earth in the coming weeks than it has been in 15 years

Get ready to duck!

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 2:00 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 2:26 am 
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and not only but also

Mars close and bright, coincides with 'longest lunar eclipse of century'
MICHAEL DALY
Last updated 15:00, June 27 2018
Image
STEVE LLYOD
The so-called 'super blood blue' moon early this year. There's another lunar eclipse in late July and it coincides with a particularly bright Mars.

The Moon and Mars will be putting on a show in July, even if New Zealand doesn't get to see all of the event being dubbed the longest lunar eclipse of the century.

"It will be something worth getting up early to go and see," Otago Museum director and astronomer Dr Ian Griffin said.

According to Nasa, the Moon will be in full eclipse - or totality - for 103 minutes. But the Moon will enter totality not long before setting in this country, on the morning of July 28.

The Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand website shows the total eclipse starting in New Zealand at a few seconds before 7.30am. The Sun then rises in Wellington just a minute later at 7.31am, while the Moon sets a few more minutes after that at 7.38am.
Image
NASA
Much of Africa and Asia will get to see the full lunar eclipse in late July, but in New Zealand the Moon will be setting about the time totality starts.

New Zealand does see the earlier stages of the eclipse, with the Moon entering the penumbra - or light shadow - at 5.14am and the umbra - dark shadow - at 6.24am.

Within days of the eclipse Mars will also be making its closest approach to the Earth in 15 years, getting to just 57.6 million kilometres away. By comparison, the average distance between Earth and Mars is 225 million kilometres. At their furthest from each other, the two planets can be around 400m km apart.

Otago Museum's Griffin will be part of joint project between the museum and Canterbury University at Mt John Observatory, Lake Tekapo to take photographs of Mars in the last week of July and post them on the internet. He is hoping to see the lunar eclipse from the observatory, depending on the weather.

"Because it's the full moon, the Moon sets when the Sun rises. We will actually be able to see the total eclipse as the Moon is setting, and the Moon will set in total eclipse, which will be a real cool view," Griffin said.

"Also that week, Mars is at the closest it's been since 2003, so Mars will be really bright in the sky."

Already Mars is unusually bright. "If you go out after sunset, about 8pm, it's rising in the eastern sky. It's incredibly bright and incredibly red," Griffin said.

"On the night of the lunar eclipse, Mars is quite close to the Moon (in the sky). At the end of the night you have a bright red-coloured Mars close to a red-coloured Moon in the sky," he said.

Mars is red because it is covered in a layer of dust mainly made up of iron, which has rusted. The Moon can appear red during an eclipse - and is sometimes referred to as a blood moon - because during an eclipse sunlight passes through Earth's atmosphere and is refracted onto the Moon, creating the blood-red colour.

"Basically when Mars is opposite the Sun in the sky, which it will be in late July, it rises at sunset and sets at sunrise." It would be "very very bright" during the last week of July.

It would be possible to see the eclipse throughout New Zealand, provided the sky was clear, Griffin said. "All you need on that morning, because the Moon's quite low in the sky, you will need an unobstructed view to the horizon, and you well also need good weather."

Mars close approaches happen about every 26 months, and is the point where Mars and Earth are closest to each other in their orbits around the Sun. The 2003 close approach was the closest in nearly 60,000 years, with the two planets within 55.8m km of each other.

- Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/105037 ... of-century

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 7:11 am 
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Interstellar object 'Oumuamua' is 'unexpectedly' speeding up, leaving Nasa scientists baffled
Olivia Tobin
8 hrs ago
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© Provided by Independent Print Limited
The first known interstellar object to travel through our solar system is unexpectedly speeding up, and scientists don’t know why.

Nasa have said observations from their Hubble Space Telescope have confirmed the interstellar object, Oumuamua, has had an “unexpected boost in speed and shift in trajectory as it passes through the inner solar system.”

Marco Micheli of ESA’s (European Space Agency) Space Situational Awareness Near-Earth Object Coordination Centre in Italy said: “Our high-precision measurements of ′Oumuamua’s position revealed that there was something affecting its motion other than the gravitational forces of the Sun and planets.”

The boost has left scientists scratching their head as to what could be causing the increase in speed, but early analysis shows some theories.

Analysing the trajectory of the interstellar visitor, co-author Davide Farnocchia of the Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) said the speed boost was consistent with the behaviour of a comet.

He said: “This additional subtle force on ′Oumuamua likely is caused by jets of gaseous material expelled from its surface,”

“This same kind of outgassing affects the motion of many comets in our solar system.”
Image
© GETTY
Interstellar visitor Oumuamua

Karen Meech, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii’s Institute of Astronomy, said she was learning lots from the interstellar object’s behaviour.

She said: “'I’m amazed at how much we have learned from a short, intense observing campaign. I can hardly wait for the next interstellar object!"

Oumuamua, less than half a mile in length, now is farther away from our Sun than Jupiter and traveling away from the Sun at about 70,000 mph as it heads toward the outskirts of the solar system. In only another four years, it will pass Neptune’s orbit on its way back into interstellar space.

http://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/techandsc ... ocid=ientp

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 8:22 am 
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Full thrust lets get outta here... :idea:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 11:56 pm 
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Plook wrote:
Full thrust lets get outta here... :idea:


on the galactic surfboard

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:29 am 
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In a cosmic first, scientists detect 'ghost particles' from a distant galaxy
SARAH KAPLAN
Last updated 06:03, July 13 2018
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FELIPE PEDREROS/NSF
The IceCube Lab under the stars.

When the sun was young and faint and the Earth was barely formed, a gigantic black hole in a distant, brilliant galaxy spat out a powerful jet of radiation.

That jet contained neutrinos - subatomic particles so tiny and difficult to detect they are nicknamed "ghost particles."

Four billion years later, at Earth's South Pole, 5160 sensors buried about two kilometres beneath the ice detected a single ghostly neutrino as it interacted with an atom.

Scientists then traced the particle back to the galaxy that created it.

The cosmic achievement, reported on Thursday by a team of more than 1000 researchers in the journal Science, is the first time scientists have detected a high-energy neutrino and been able to pinpoint where it came from.

It heralds the arrival of a new era of astronomy in which researchers can learn about the universe using neutrinos as well as ordinary light.

This is physics at its most mind-boggling and extreme.

Researchers compared the breakthrough to the 2017 detection of ripples in space time caused by colliding dead stars, which added gravitational waves to scientists' toolbox for observing the cosmos.
Image
SHELLEY TAN/WASHINGTON POST
What are "ghost particles"?

Neutrinos are so small that they seldom bump into atoms so humans can't feel them.

They don't shed light, so our eyes can't see them. Yet these very qualities make them invaluable for conveying information across time and space, scientists say.

Light can be blocked and gravitational waves can be bent, but neutrinos are unscathed as they travel from the most violent events in the universe into a detector at the bottom of the Earth.

Scientists call the kinds of signals they can detect through space, like radio waves or gravitational waves or now neutrinos, "messengers."

If you're trying to understand complex and chaotic phenomena happening billions of light-years away, it's helpful to have a messenger like a neutrino: one that doesn't get lost.

"They're very clean, they have simple interactions, and that means every single neutrino interaction tells you something," said Heidi Schellman, a particle physicist at Oregon State University and computing coordinator for a different neutrino detection project, the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, who was not involved with the new research.

Neutrinos arrive on Earth at varying energy levels, which are signatures of the processes that created them.

By pairing neutrino detections with light observations, Schellman said, scientists will be able to answer questions about distant cataclysms, test theories about the composition of the universe, and refine their understanding of the fundamental rules of physics.

The high-energy neutrino reported Thursday was created in the fast-moving swirl of matter around a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy.

When this black hole generates a brilliant jet of radiation, and that jet is aimed directly at Earth, scientists call the galaxy a "blazar."

Subsequent analysis revealed this blazar had also produced a flare of more than a dozen neutrino events several years earlier.

The new discovery, from the South Pole neutrino detector called IceCube, has also solved a mystery that stumped scientists for generations: What is the source of mysterious cosmic rays? These extremely energetic particles have been detected raining down from space since 1912, but researchers could not figure out what phenomenon could produce particles moving at such high speeds.

Astroparticle physicist and IceCube spokesman Darren Grant said it's as though scientists have spent 100 years listening to thunder with their eyes closed and never known what caused the booming sound.

It wasn't until they looked up and saw lightning that the spectacle finally made sense. Both sound and light - or in this case, cosmic rays and neutrinos - are coming from the same event.

"That's why this is exciting," Grant said of the neutrino detection. "It's a brand new vision on what's happening in the universe."

Our universe is suffused with neutrinos, so named because they are uncharged (or "neutral") and infinitesimally puny (about a millionth of the mass of an electron).

They are created in nuclear reactions - at power plants, in the centre of the sun, and amid even more extreme events - when protons accelerate, collide and then shatter in a shower of energetic particles.

Neutrinos are the second most abundant type of particle in the universe, after photons (light particles). If you held your hand toward the sky, about a billion neutrinos from the sun would pass through it in a single second.

But you wouldn't feel their presence, because these ethereal particles rarely interact with normal matter. Unless a neutrino bumps right up against another particle, it passes through matter undisturbed and undetected.

And the reality is, most of what we call "matter" is just empty space.

If a hydrogen atom were the size of Earth, the proton at its centre would fit inside the Ohio State football stadium. The electron orbiting it would be even smaller, and a neutrino could be compared to a lone ant.

Neutrinos are said to come in "flavours" - called electron, muon and tau - and on the rare occasions that they collide with other matter they generate corresponding charged particles.

Many neutrino detectors work by looking for the flash of light emitted by these charged particles as they move through water or ice.

Flavoured specks that are found everywhere yet felt by no one; matter that seems solid but is actually mostly empty - this is the bizarre science of particle physics.

It's difficult to wrap your mind around, and almost hard to believe.

Yet scientists assure us they are not just making things up. Since the 1950s, when neutrinos were detected for the first time, researchers have observed low-energy versions of these ghostly particles coming from the sun and a 1987 supernova in a nearby galaxy.

Maps of neutrinos emanating from the surface of the Earth have even been used to identify the sites of nuclear reactors.

But high-energy neutrinos, generated only in extreme environments where protons are accelerated to astonishing speeds, have been challenging to pin down.

To be detected, a neutrino had to form long ago in a far away cataclysm, travel across intergalactic space, fly through our galaxy, enter our solar system, sail on to Earth, and then happen to interact with a particle minding its own business in the ice below the South Pole.

And, in a process that seems just as improbable, in the time since the neutrino left its source 4 billion years ago, life on Earth had to arise, expand, and evolve to the point that a few enterprising Homo sapiens were willing to go to the extreme effort of detecting it.

"It's crazy," said Chad Finley, an astroparticle physicist at Stockholm University who spent 10 years coordinating the effort to pinpoint neutrinos' origins for the IceCube team. "These are particles that seldom interact with anything. That has to be the unluckiest neutrino ever."

On the other hand, he mused, he and his colleagues are some pretty lucky humans.

This was the detection scientists were dreaming of when the National Science Foundation began building the US$279 million IceCube Neutrino Observatory in 2005.

Working during the South Pole summer, when the sun never sets and temperatures hover at a balmy -27 degrees Celsius, scientists and engineers melted dozens of kilometre-deep holes in the ice and dropped strings of spherical sensors into them. (Neutrino detectors are typically buried or submerged to filter out other cosmic signals that would obscure the tiny particles.)

The result was a grid array of sensors spread across a cubic kilometre of glacier and capable of catching a ghost.

The sensors record the energy level and direction of the flash of light emitted by the charged particle created when a neutrino crashes into other matter.

From that information, scientists can extrapolate the energy level of the neutrino and where it came from.

Since the observatory was completed in 2010, IceCube scientists have detected dozens of high-energy neutrinos coming from outside the solar system. But they were never able to connect those particles with a source that could be observed by conventional telescopes.

Establishing such a connection was a "holy grail of the field," Finley said, in large part because of the link between neutrinos and the enigma of cosmic rays.

These are extremely energetic protons and atomic nuclei moving through space at almost the speed of light.

They're considered one of the threats to humans on a potential mission to Mars: During the months-long journey through space, cosmic rays would damage the cells of astronauts and could cause radiation sickness.

But unlike neutrinos, cosmic rays have a charge, which means their path can be deflected by magnetic fields. This allows Earth's magnetic field to protect us from these powerful particles, but it also makes it impossible for scientists to figure out where the particles come from.

Extensive research suggests that whatever process accelerates protons to such speeds also generates high-energy neutrinos. So if IceCube could figure out where neutrinos were coming from - a task made simpler by the fact that neutrinos are such dependable "messengers" - they'd know the source of cosmic rays as well.

"Neutrinos are the smoking gun," Finley said.

On Sept. 22, an alert went out to the international astronomy community: IceCube had seen the signature of a muon neutrino coming from just above the right shoulder of the constellation Orion in the night sky.

Swiftly, scores of scientists began pointing their telescopes in that direction, staring at the right region of the universe in every wavelength of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Researchers using Nasa's Fermi space telescope saw a burst of gamma rays coming from the presumed source. Gamma rays are associated with the particle acceleration that produces both neutrinos and cosmic rays.

Other observatories saw flares of X-rays, radio waves and visible light. Taken together, these observations revealed a blazar - a giant elliptical galaxy with a spinning supermassive black hole at its core.

As a blazar spins, twin jets of light and charged particles - one of which is aimed toward Earth - spurt from its poles.

The blazar was given the catchy name "TXS 0506+056" - the first known source of a high-energy neutrino, and a possible answer to the century-old cosmic ray mystery.

As a matter of due diligence, Finley suggested that the IceCube team go back through their old data to examine whether any other neutrinos had come from the same direction.

He didn't expect to find anything - neutrinos react so rarely that finding more from a single source would be like lightning striking twice in the same spot.

So he was shocked to discover that IceCube had recorded more than a dozen neutrino events from what they now knew was the same blazar between late 2014 and early 2015.

It was so improbable that Finley found himself repeating the words uttered by Isidor Isaac Rabi, a Nobel prize-winning US physicist, when he discovered the muon: "Who ordered that?"

Combined with gravitational wave detection and traditional light astronomy, the observation of a neutrino from a known source gives researchers three ways to observe the cosmos, and they say we're now in the era of "multi-messenger astrophysics." (Since gravitational waves are often described as the way we "hear" the universe and light is how we "see" it, some scientists wondered whether neutrinos would be how we "smell" it.)

Of all these "senses," neutrinos are in some ways the most reliable.

High-energy light from distant sources rarely makes it to Earth, because photons are so reactive they get lost along the way. Neutrinos, on the other hand, will travel in a straight line right from their origin point to a detector.

"It's an absolutely beautiful messenger," Grant said.

Neutrinos' ghostly quality also means they can be used to probe celestial objects light can't penetrate.

Schellman pointed out that astronomers using regular telescopes can't see beneath the surface of the sun, but 30 years of observations of the low-energy neutrinos that emanate from our star's centre have allowed scientists to peer into its core.

By looking at their energy levels, researchers could understand the fusion process that creates the neutrinos and generates the sun's energy.

This research also revealed that it takes 100,000 years for energy at the center of the sun to make it to the surface, "which means the sun is going to keep working for at least 100,000 years," Schellman said.

So that's one disaster Earthlings don't have to worry about.

The neutrinos detected by IceCube are millions of times more energetic than those coming from the sun, but they offer the same kinds of insights into the intense environments from which the particles emanate.

The telescopes looking at TXS 0506+056 could only capture what happened on the surface of the blazar; the neutrinos carry signatures of the processes at its very centre.

It's in these extreme settings that the laws of nature are stretched to their limits. What neutrinos reveal about the acceleration of charged particles and the voracious behaviour of black holes could help scientists refine the rules of physics - or rethink them.

And there are even more energetic neutrinos out there - ones that make the powerful IceCube particles look practically wimpy. To Schellman, this suggests that other, even more chaotic and cataclysmic, sources of neutrinos are still waiting to be found.

"There are things we don't even know about yet," she said. "This is just the start."

- The Washington Post

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 7:13 pm 
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Nasa works out precisely how fast universe is expanding – and finds bizarre result that could understanding of cosmos
Andrew Griffin
5 hrs ago

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Scientist have made the most precise measurement of the universe's expansion ever – and found a very strange result indeed.

The Nasa research used two space telescopes to work out exactly how quickly the universe was growing. Discovering that important number could help understand where the cosmos came from and where it is going.

But the new precise measurement actually leads to more confusion than it dispels. There seems to be a strange mismatch in the way the universe is expanding – a discovery that could suggest there is an entirely new physics underpinning the universe, waiting to be found.

The mysterious results could be caused by dark matter, dark energy being even more exotic than previously thought, or an unknown new particle in the tapestry of space, Nasa said.

Scientists have long been attempting to work out the rate the universe is expanding – known as the Hubble constant – as precisely as they possibly can. Discovering how quickly it has been growing since the big bang 13.8 billion years ago could answer the most fundamental questions about where the universe came from and where it is going.

But as the measurements have become more precise, they have also become more different. The results that come out of the different ways of measuring the rate of expansion are at odds with each other.

Scientists have initially been concerned that the discrepancy was the result of an error in one or more of the ways that they are trying to measure the constant. But the new research suggests that is not the case, and that the measurements are correct – but that something undiscovered is changing the way the universe is expanding.

One measurement comes from ESA's Planck mission, which mapped the universe as it looked only 360,000 years after it came into being. By looking at that map, scientists can work out the speed at which the universe came to be where it is today.

But the new Nasa research shows that the expansion rate calculated from that data does not match up with the universe as we see it around us. The new data from the Hubble Space Telescope does not match up with the calculations from the Planck mission.

"The tension seems to have grown into a full-blown incompatibility between our views of the early and late time universe," said team leader and Nobel Laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. "At this point, clearly it's not simply some gross error in any one measurement.

"It's as though you predicted how tall a child would become from a growth chart and then found the adult he or she became greatly exceeded the prediction. We are very perplexed."

http://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/world/nas ... ocid=ientp

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 7:50 pm 
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Tonight in the western sky: Venus and the Moon...
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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 10:51 pm 
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Excellent! 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 2:25 am 
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There is a dark Maroon Sofa out there somewhere :smoke:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:07 am 
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Venus was much closer to the lower crest from Nor Cal...very awesome... :!:


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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:32 am 
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Nice MTF, sometimes the most simple is the most pretty :)

If you check it out tonight, the Moon will be a little thicker and to the left of Venus, it shows ya how far the Moon moves along the ecliptic (path the Sun, Moon, and outer planets trace every day), and phases night to night :)

With a scope, Venus being an inner planet goes through phases during it's orbit, mimicking Moon phases. The amount of one day of moon travel can be seen by comparing where it was last night in relation to Venus, (Venus position changes very little night to night.

If you want to see the plane of the solar system, draw an imaginary line from venus to the point on the horizon where the sun just set, that's the plane of orbit of all the planets.

More Venus fun, can you spot venus in the daytime? Watch the point where the sun just set and compare Venus' relative position...then the next day look that distance to the left of the sun with binoculars until you find Venus, then lower them a little and search that spot naked eye. It's not easy as your eves don't know what to focus on until you spot it, then your focus locks in.

CAUTION, do NOT let the sun creep into binocular field even for a second, it can blind you.


------------------------------

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, (a few years back, lol). Jupiter was actually out of the frame's upper left corner and available for a 5 - planet line up, but it ruined the composition putting it in. Mercury's elusive, but no match for a time exposure :)



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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 12:48 pm 
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There is a place where Trump makes sense
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 Post subject: Re: Space Is Deep
PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 3:49 am 
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It’s a busy night sky this July, so make sure you look up
TANYA HILL
Last updated 04:57, July 17 2018

The Longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century is set to coincide with bright Mars at its closest to Earth in 15 years.

The next fortnight will be a real treat for stargazers - there are five planets to see in the evening sky, Mars is looking the best we’ve seen in 15 years, and on the morning of July 28 there will be a total lunar eclipse.

We are currently in the midst of a five-planet season due to Jupiter and Saturn being on the same side of the Sun.

Look to the sky after sunset, and if you have a good view of both the eastern and western horizons you’ll see the planets stretched out in a line. Mars and Saturn will be rising in the east, Jupiter will sit high overhead, and bright Venus and faint Mercury will be setting in the west.

Image
STEVE LLOYD
The Blood Moon from January 31, 2018. Our second chance to see an eclipsed Moon this year is coming up on July 28.

Just after sunset, you will be able to spot all 5 in a row stretching from east to west at about about 6pm-6:30pm, Josh Kirkley from Auckland's Stardome Observatory and Planetarium said.

Over the next few years there will be more moments when all five planets visible to the naked eye can be seen together. But eventually Jupiter and Saturn will drift apart and once that occurs it will be another decade before the five planets come together once more.

The Moon begins its tour of the planets on Sunday, July 15. It’ll be a thin crescent low in the western sky and is a great signpost for Mercury which will be just to the left of the Moon with bright Venus sitting above.

The following night the Moon will be near Venus (as shown in the image above). Then on July 19, the First Quarter Moon will sit below the bright star Spica.

On July 21, the gibbous Moon will have made its way to Jupiter and by July 25 it will meet up with Saturn.

The Full Moon completes the tour on July 27 when it joins Mars shining at its best and brightest.

RED PLANET, RED MOON

Each month when we see the Full Moon, we are seeing the Moon “in opposition”. This means the Moon is directly opposite the Sun, rising as the Sun sets and setting as the Sun rises.

On July 27, not only is the Moon in opposition but Mars is too, and it’s a highly favourable one that brings Mars much closer to Earth than average.

Mars makes its closest approach to Earth on July 31 at a distance of 58 million km and its rapid increase in brightness over the past few weeks has been amazing to see.

Until early September, Mars will outshine Jupiter and become the third-brightest object in the night sky, behind the Moon and Venus (a graph of Mars’ brightness is here).

The reason that Mars can vary in brightness so much is because it’s our neighbour in space and it follows quite an elliptical orbit. Throughout 2017, Mars was fairly dull as it was on the opposite side of the Sun to Earth, and therefore at its most distant.

But even at each opposition the distance between Earth and Mars can vary by almost 50 million km, because of the two planets’ elliptical orbits. 2018 is definitely one of the best.

With Mars a striking red in the night sky, what else could be better than teaming up with a blood-red Moon.

INTO THE SHADOW

When we look to the skies during the early hours of July 28, red Mars will be sitting just above and to the left of the eclipsed Moon.

Across the Southern Hemisphere everyone will see the Moon enter Earth’s shadow at the exact same moment. In fact, everyone on the night side of Earth will see the eclipse together.

The eclipse will begin with the Moon in the western sky and the Moon will set as the eclipse progresses. As the Moon sets, the Sun will rise so the later part of the eclipse will occur against the brightening dawn sky.

The exact time of Moonset depends on location, with the Moon setting (and the Sun rising) earlier at more northern latitudes.

The advantage of seeing the eclipsed Moon low to the horizon is that the Moon illusion will come into play. Our brains will trick us into thinking that the Moon is larger than normal, which is why the rising and setting Moon can be particularly breathtaking.

LUNAR TRIFECTA

Lunar eclipses are generally slow and leisurely events, but this one tops them all by being the longest eclipse of the 21st century.

Totality will last for 1 hour and 43 minutes, just 4 minutes short of the longest possible duration. Three things have come together to make this possible.

First, and most importantly, this eclipse will see the Moon move through the centre of Earth’s shadow, making for a long and deep eclipse.

Second, the eclipse occurs during an “apogee” Moon, when the Moon is at its most distant from Earth.

For those who remember Kepler’s Second Law, being at its most distant means that the Moon is moving at its slowest. Therefore, it will spend 5-10 minutes longer in Earth’s shadow compared with a perigee Moon, when the Moon is at its closest approach to Earth and moving more rapidly.

Finally, an extra few minutes are picked up because this eclipse is occurring near aphelion, which is when Earth is furthest from the Sun and occurs in early July.

What’s interesting is that when Earth is furthest from the Sun, Earth’s “umbral shadow” lengthens and widens.

The umbra is the darkest part of Earth’s shadow and is the region the Moon must move through to make an eclipse (there are also penumbral eclipses, when the Moon passes only through the lighter, penumbral shadow, but it is almost impossible to make out any real change to the Moon’s brightness in this case).

It’s completely safe to watch a lunar eclipse and no special equipment is needed to see it. This is our last chance to see a total lunar eclipse until May 2021, although we will catch a partial lunar eclipse next July.

So get ready for some great planet-watching over the next fortnight, and remember to set your alarm early on July 28 to see the eclipse and catch a true natural wonder.

Tanya Hill is Honorary Fellow of the University of Melbourne and Senior Curator (Astronomy) at Museums Victoria.

This article was originally published on The Conversation.

Clips and stuff https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/105521782 ... ou-look-up

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