Zappa.com

The Official Frank Zappa Messageboards
It is currently Fri Apr 16, 2021 4:45 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 93 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2003 6:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 16, 2002 9:41 pm
Posts: 998
Location: E--> CA, the dancinest place2b
[quote author=dallas alice link=board=general;num=1062243060;start=75#76 date=11/13/03 at 14:07:31] by far the most damaging drug in any of our nations is alcohlol - this stuff is legal yet results in millions of lost working hours ( hangover ) per year , it destroys familys, results in aggressive behavior swamping hospital resources on weekends - yet is perfectly legal. [/quote]<br><br>I agree.  I can't stand drunk people and the dumb things they do.  <br>

_________________
Nothing is what I want.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2003 5:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2003 1:00 am
Posts: 3155
Drugs are good for people who like them...simple isnt it?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2003 5:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2002 2:44 am
Posts: 2067
Location: sweden
I don't use drugs but I do listen to Drukqs ;)<br><br> -/dr_grogg<br><br>

_________________
Yeah, just as it used to be, but still not.....


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2019 7:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:18 pm
Posts: 8812
Location: Over there! (last)
Mike Luckovich
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:45 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 42077
Location: >>==> Wellington, Aotearoa, New Zealand.
The shocking face of addiction - two photos, seven months apart
10:03, October the 12th, 2019

Image
FACEBOOK
The photos of Cody Bishop were taken just seven months apart.

A US mother has posted on social media a shocking photo of her son decimated by heroin and meth.

Jennifer Salfen-Tracy has taken to Facebook to show the effects of addiction on Cody Bishop in photos taken just seven months apart.

The mother from Missouri says Bishop is living rough in Las Vegas and that she hasn't heard from him in two weeks.

"Hearing how bad he is doing is hard but not hearing at all is worse. The unknown is what makes a person not sleep at night," wrote Salfen-Tracy.

Salfen-Tracy admits she was hesitant on posting publicly.


"I have learned along this path that so many people and families deal with the same heartache but just do not talk about it.

"This is a true issue in our world today that we need to pull together and focus on to fix instead of the government worrying about and spending all their money on throwing each other under the bus."

The post has attracted a massive response with over 19,000 comments and 48,000 shares at the time of writing.

"This is not just a problem that my family faces but almost everyone knows someone who has a drug/heroin addiction. I pray for strength for those suffering and healing for their families and friends."

Salfen-Tracy finishes with a simple message.

"Cody if you see this please call us ... we love you."

Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/ ... nths-apart

_________________
Hey Punk, where you goin' with that passport in your hand?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 1:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 42077
Location: >>==> Wellington, Aotearoa, New Zealand.
Meth 'swamping' New Zealand as prices hit record lows
JOHN WEEKES·05:00, Oct 08 2019

Plunging methamphetamine prices in spite of massive seizures indicate the highly addictive drug is overwhelming New Zealand, a narcotics expert says.

Meth is selling for record low prices in Auckland, the Waikato and Wellington, according to Massey University researchers.

Associate Professor Chris Wilkins told Stuff meth sent to New Zealand was produced on an "industrial scale" in Mexico and several Asian countries.

"The kind of seizures they're seeing now are just beyond believable," Wilkins said as preliminary findings from the New Zealand Drug Trends Survey were released.

Image
NZ POLICE
Northland Police in June 2016 seized 449kg of meth.

Wilkins said record lows of $450 per gram in the three heavily populated North Island regions indicated vast quantities of meth were arriving, despite the efforts of authorities.

"They're just essentially swamped by the size of supply."

Enormous recent meth seizures included a 216-kilogram Waikato haul a fortnight ago and a 469kg shipment seized in Auckland earlier in September.

Massey researchers said lower meth prices in the three regions were also consistent with a proximity to highly concentrated domestic meth manufacturers.

After 10,966 people completed the survey, researchers warned vulnerable people, including first-time users and young people, were most at risk from falling prices.

The median price for a gram of meth was down nationwide, to $500 this year from $538 a year earlier.

"The shocking thing for us was the change in the price,", Wilkins said.

In the West Coast and Otago, prices had fallen from $800 a gram last year to $600 this year.

Canterbury's prices were down to $500 per gram.

Wilkins said high meth prices and low meth prices could both be socially destructive.

Image
AP/SUPPLIED
Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman's Sinaloa Cartel has been linked to New Zealand organised crime groups.

Low prices meant the drug was more accessible.

But high prices could trigger an increase in violent crime as people in the illegal trade grew more desperate to protect their interests, he said.

Meth prices in New Zealand were still high by global standards.

Drug experts last month told Stuff high local demand, abundant overseas supply, and retail prices coalesced to bring battle-hardened foreign networks to the domestic drugs trade.

And Customs investigations manager Bruce Berry told The Detail that whereas meth was once smuggled in 'to-order', it was now being imported in bulk and stockpiled.

Massey's Social And Health Outcomes Research And Evaluation (SHORE) and Whāriki Research Centre carried out the New Zealand Drug Trends Survey.

Nationwide, 29 per cent of meth users reported falling prices in the six months preceding the survey. Only 4 per cent reported increases.

In contrast to meth prices, researchers said cannabis, LSD and ecstasy prices appeared mostly stable.

AVERAGE METH PRICE

Northland $500
Auckland $400
Waikato $450
Bay of Plenty $500
Taranaki $500
Gisborne & Hawkes' Bay $500
Manawatu & Wanganui $600
Wellington $450
Tasman, Nelson & Marlborough $650
​Canterbury $500
Southland & West Coast $600
Otago $550

(SHORE & Whāriki Research Centre)

FOR HELP
Alcohol & Drug Helpline: alcoholdrughelp.org.nz / 0800 787 797
Narcotics Anonymous: nzna.org


Stuff

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/ ... ecord-lows

_________________
Hey Punk, where you goin' with that passport in your hand?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 6592
Location: Oregon
^^Would hate to see what would happen if the prices fell to as low as they are in the US^^

https://www.rehabcenter.net/the-average-cost-of-illegal-drugs-on-the-street/:
On average, the price of crystal meth is $80/gram.
An 8 ball, or 3.5 grams, is $200.
A single dose of meth is about .25g, or $20.

_________________
“Listen to everyone, read everything; believe absolutely nothing unless you can prove it in your own right!”


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: re: thmq
PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:19 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 7:29 pm
Posts: 10257
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 6592
Location: Oregon
Safe injection sites idea draws controversy
by KATU NewsTuesday, October 15th 2019

https://katu.com/news/recover-northwest/safe-injection-sites-idea-draws-controversy

PORTLAND, Ore. — It began with a question from the audience during Monday night’s KATU-PSU town hall on curbing Oregon’s opioid crisis.

“They treat it as a health crisis, not a criminal act. So, are there any plans to do anything like that here in Portland?”

The audience member was referring to a somewhat radical solution to the opioid crisis that’s being tried around the world, but not yet in the United States: Safe consumptions sites, also known as safe injection sites.

KOMO -- KATU’s sister station in Seattle -- reported on a place in Vancouver, British Columbia where drug users can safely use drugs in the presence of medical nurses and doctors.

Supporters feel it’s better to keep drug users alive -- in a safe environment with clean needles and resources -- until they are ready to quit. That’s when nurses can get addicts to treatment.

“There have been no fatal overdoses at a safe consumption space. None. Those save lives,” said Morgan Godvin, who was a panelist during the town hall.

Godvin was addicted to heroin for five years and was incarcerated on charges of “conspiracy to distribute heroin” when one of her best friends died from an overdose. She’s now a student at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health.

But not everybody is onboard with the idea, including lawmakers.

During an interview separate from the town hall, a former Washington state senator echoed what opponents worry about -- that the sites enable drug use and pave the way for crime.

“We’ll start attracting heroin addicts and users from all across the nation to our streets,” said Mark Miloscia, who represented constituents in Federal Way. “If you think it’s bad now, wait months after they start a heroin injection site in Seattle.”

There are roughly 200 safe consumption sites operating legally around the world; however, none are legally operating in the United States.

During the town hall, Haven Wheelock, a syringe exchange coordinator at Outside In, explained how this worldwide concept could become an American reality.

“A federal court judge ruled that safe consumption sites do not fall under the ‘crackhouse laws,’ which was something that has presented a huge barrier in policymakers actually being brave enough to kind of move this stuff forward,” she said.

The ruling: safe consumption sites such as the one in Vancouver, British Columbia, reduce drug use, they don’t facilitate it.

Watch the town hall:
https://katu.com/news/recover-northwest/safe-injection-sites-idea-draws-controversy?jwsource=cl

_________________
“Listen to everyone, read everything; believe absolutely nothing unless you can prove it in your own right!”


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 6592
Location: Oregon
It looks like weed, but it's not: Law enforcement warn of fentanyl disguised as cannabis
by Jim SpiewakMonday, October 21st 2019

Image
https://kutv.com/news/local/it-looks-like-weed-but-its-not-law-enforcement-warn-of-fentanyl-disguised-as-cannabis-10-22-2019

SALT LAKE CITY (KUTV) — A dangerous and deadly drug is popping up disguised to look like marijuana.

2News obtained an internal law enforcement bulletin describing the trend. The bulletin warned law enforcement agencies across the country to be aware of the potential dangers.

“I think a lot of death could come from this, I think — a lot of people stepping into the realm of overdose unexpectedly,” recovering addict Chris Ruflin said of the photos.

The bulletin states the substance tested positive for fentanyl, heroin, *SPAM*, and traces of meth.

"I think a lot of teenagers, I think a lot of the younger generation, is going to end up getting ahold of that,” Ruflin said.

These fakes have been seen in Ohio and Canada so far. 2News reached out to multiple law enforcement agencies in Utah, who all said they have not seen this product on the streets yet.

“When you start seeing something anywhere in the U.S., there's a good chance it's going to spread across the country,” said Sgt. Brandon Shearer with the Salt Lake City Police Department.

That's not only dangerous for drug users, but for unsuspecting officers who think they might be handling weed when it's actually fentanyl, which is much more deadly to the touch.

“You don't know where it came from, you don't know how it was made, and you're really taking a huge personal safety risk by taking those substances in,” Shearer said.
______________________________________________
:? If this is really true, it's very scary!!

_________________
“Listen to everyone, read everything; believe absolutely nothing unless you can prove it in your own right!”


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:17 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:25 pm
Posts: 6592
Location: Oregon
Police department issues hilarious warning for 'highly addictive' Girl Scout Cookies.
Updated: 2:11 PM PST Jan 15, 2020

https://www.ksbw.com/article/police-department-issues-hilarious-warning-for-highly-addictive-girl-scout-cookies/30537167#

Image

A Wisconsin police department shared a humorous Facebook post warning the public of "a highly addictive substance" coming to their area.

The "substance" being Girl Scouts Cookies, which the Kenosha Police Department jokingly says go by several street names, including Thin Mint, Shortbread, S’mores.

The post goes on to say how easy it is to get "hooked" on the treats and if someone comes in contact with any cookies, they should bring them to the station for "proper disposal."

_________________
“Listen to everyone, read everything; believe absolutely nothing unless you can prove it in your own right!”


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2021 12:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 42077
Location: >>==> Wellington, Aotearoa, New Zealand.
Image

_________________
Hey Punk, where you goin' with that passport in your hand?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 1:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 42077
Location: >>==> Wellington, Aotearoa, New Zealand.
Image

Ketamine Is Revealing a New Understanding of Depression and the Brain

Some experts view ketamine as a tool to unravel the biological causes of depression and, perhaps someday, cure it

Nearly all antidepressants work in line with what’s called the monoamine hypothesis of depression, which emerged in the 1950s. The hypothesis asserts that depression is caused by low levels of chemical messengers in the brain called monoamine neurotransmitters, which include serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline. The idea is simple: Increase levels of these neurotransmitters in the brain and reverse depression.

The drugs prescribed to do that fall into several categories, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). They all affect one or more of the monoamine neurotransmitters. These drugs cause monoamines to remain in the synaptic cleft — the space between neurons — for longer, and their success at treating depression is thought to be related to a variety of effects such as the birth of new neurons in a part of the brain called the hippocampus (an area responsible for learning, memory, and emotion) and the increased production of proteins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to build neural connections. These processes take time and may account for the lag typically associated with antidepressants. It can take anywhere from weeks to months to alleviate depression symptoms.

The problem is these drugs only work for about half of people.

A 2019 review published in the journal Neuron argues that by narrowly focusing on these neurotransmitters and their role in depression for the past several decades, scientists missed opportunities to identify other neurobiological causes of depression and, therefore, potential new treatments. The authors say “there had long been clues” that changes in the brain, beyond the monoamine neurotransmitters, were relevant to depression. For example, increased BDNF can be caused by signaling outside of the monoamine pathways. In fact, while antidepressants can increase this growth factor, it is likely more of a subtle change, as opposed to the large shift required to alleviate depression (which can be achieved by other treatments such as electroconvulsive therapy).

It’s no surprise then that typical antidepressants fail for many people. One of the most widely cited and largest studies on the effectiveness of common antidepressants, the STAR*D trial, showed that more than half of people treated with several different antidepressants still had persistent symptoms. “And a big proportion of them relapsed; clearly those antidepressant medications weren’t working as well as we thought they were,” says Robert McClure, MD, a psychiatrist and associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

When these drugs were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) they were based on data showing efficacy, he says. “But when these studies were repeated and done in a more scientific way and not in the context of, you know, a *SPAM* company having an agenda to try and get the treatment FDA approved, we discovered that these treatments are not as effective as we thought they were.”

Beyond the monoamine hypothesis

Depression treatments beyond the conventional drugs that target monoamine neurotransmitters include ketamine and psychedelics. Ketamine is not technically a psychedelic but an anesthetic, although it can cause hallucinatory and dissociative effects. There may also be overlap in the way they affect the brain, according to Carlene MacMillan, MD, psychiatrist and CEO and co-founder of Brooklyn Minds.

Drugs like ketamine can rapidly trigger neuroplasticity, the recreation and strengthening of connections between neurons, and the way the brain rewires itself. And they suppress the brain’s default mode network (DMN), areas thought to be associated with introspection and mind-wandering. When this nexus is quieted, “the more pre-conscious, emotional, and primitive parts of the brain can take center stage during the experience,” says MacMillan. “It is in this space that we see new connections and shifts in perspective occurring.”

An alternative way of thinking about psychedelics is described in the book How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan. Here, the brain is compared to a snowy hill covered in sled tracks. In this analogy, the sleds are thoughts. Over time, certain sled paths become well-worn, making it difficult to take any other route. These deep grooves signify the most traveled neural pathways, which happen to pass through the DMN. Psychedelics act like a fresh coat of snow, erasing the previous grooves. This allows for travel (or thoughts) in new directions and the creation of new pathways.

A game-changer

Ketamine is not a new drug. Developed in the 1960s, it rapidly became prevalent during the Vietnam war as an anesthetic. “You could administer ketamine during surgery and people would be completely unaware of what’s going on. And that’s done basically by shutting down the cerebral cortex,” explains McClure.

But it wasn’t until several decades later that scientists wondered if the drug might also be an effective antidepressant. Unlike the drugs that target monoamines, ketamine works through a different type of neurotransmitter called glutamate. The specific proteins on neurons that recognize and are affected by glutamate include the N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Agents like ketamine that blunt the activity of this NMDA receptor seemed to improve rodents’ stress responses. Then researchers at Yale University found that ketamine quelled major depression symptoms in people. In 2006, ketamine was discovered to do the same for those with treatment-resistant depression, people who had already (and unsuccessfully) tried over six antidepressants. It was also effective at silencing suicidal ideation.

“This was a huge game-changer,” says McClure. “There had been no new *SPAM* agents for depression in many, many years.”

Ketamine worked faster, too. “Anyone who has taken an oral antidepressant, like a serotonergic agent, knows that it’s going to take six weeks before it starts working,” says McClure. “Whereas if you use ketamine people can experience improvement in 24–48 hours.”

But because ketamine isn’t new and, therefore, patentable and monetizable, *SPAM* companies scrambled to develop other drugs that mimicked ketamine’s blockade of the NMDA receptor. In 2019, the nasal spray esketamine, or Spravato, was approved by the FDA.

“Response rates vary but are generally between 50 and 80% for people receiving ketamine [intravenous] infusions,” says MacMillan. Compared to traditional antidepressants, Spravato also works better. “A general range of response rate for esketamine after a month of intranasal treatments is 53–69%.”

McClure points out there have been no large head-to-head comparison trials so it’s difficult to say if one works better. Intravenous dosing is easier to tailor to the patient, although the nasal spray is more likely to be covered by insurance companies as intravenous ketamine is still considered “experimental.”

Not a cure, but a tool

Some experts view ketamine as a tool to unravel the biological causes of depression and, perhaps someday, cure it. “Ketamine provided us an unprecedented opportunity to study the brain rapidly switching from severe depression to improved mood within hours,” says Chadi Abdallah, MD, associate professor of psychiatry and chair in the neuropsychiatry of military post-traumatic stress syndrome in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine.

Exactly what ketamine does to the brain is still under investigation. But most scientists agree that it has to do with glutamate, the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain, and the strengthening of connections between neurons in areas implicated in depression. MacMillan likes to think of ketamine as fertilizing a garden. “Ketamine very quickly increases the activity of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the frontal part of the brain that is underactive in depression. This leads to new connections forming between neurons in that area and causing old ones to regrow.”

Synaptic loss caused by depression may disrupt certain brain networks that ketamine can restore, at least temporarily.

At Vanderbilt University, Lisa Monteggia, PhD, professor of *SPAM* and director of the Vanderbilt Brain Institute, and her lab are meticulously mapping out what happens when ketamine binds to the NMDA receptor and blocks its activity. According to Monteggia, these receptors are positioned to dramatically affect signaling between neurons because they lie right at the synapse where communication takes place. “That’s why you trigger these antidepressant effects, you’re at the right place to impact rapid neurotransmission changes.”

Her lab found that when ketamine dampens activity at these receptors, a flurry of events occurs, including a new, unconventional type of signaling, or plasticity, at the synapse through a different glutamate receptor called AMPA; this effect is called potentiation. “This potentiation is the antidepressant effect.”

But ketamine is not a cure. Rather, it’s a window. “We’re revealing it, not fixing it,” explains Monteggia of the antidepressant effect. Unfortunately, the antidepressant effects of ketamine on the brain are temporary. The new connections are short-lived with symptoms returning in around 10–14 days.

“We’re using ketamine, if you will, sort of like a rosetta stone to understand what is a rapid antidepressant effect,” says Monteggia, who stresses that depression is multifaceted and involves multiple genes, environmental factors, and brain circuits going awry. “It’s difficult to believe ketamine can come in and fix all these different circuits, but it may be able to sort of mask it because you just triggered this potentiation.”

Figuring out how to maintain these new synaptic connections is the challenge.

Clues may come from other areas of depression research. “It is thought that abnormally high inflammation in depression is causing the brain connection loss in the first place and subsequently the removal of ketamine-induced connections,” says Abdallah. He and his colleagues recently published a study that found that giving rapamycin, an anti-inflammatory drug, to people prior to intravenous ketamine, prolonged the antidepressant effects; at two weeks, remission rates were higher in the pre-treatment group.

Rapamycin may have protected new connections by reducing inflammation, but it does other things too that could potentially explain the findings. For example, it can increase autophagy, “the process through which cells remove toxic materials and dead elements in tissues,” says Abdallah. In other words, it helps to clear the neurons of any junk, which may also help to preserve new synapses.

It’s still too soon to tell whether this strategy or other efforts may preserve ketamine’s effects. McClure thinks inflammation and microbiome research may yield insight into depression and treatment. At UNC, he says they’re interested in biological markers or biomarkers, which are measurable features of a patient, such as particular protein levels, to explore other possible ways ketamine works. If reliable biomarkers can be teased out, they could offer insight into who is more likely to respond to particular treatments, like ketamine. “I think psychiatrists would really like to have predictors, either clinical characteristics or biomarkers, that we can use to predict who’s going to respond to which treatment.”

Most ketamine studies examine what happens after one infusion, but clinical protocols call for biweekly infusions for at least a month followed by maintenance ketamine treatments spaced farther apart. After the initiation series, the time between these booster treatments will largely be determined by the patient’s responsiveness. McClure says that a few studies found that continued ketamine treatment is necessary for continued remission. “This is not surprising since we know maintenance antidepressant treatment is necessary in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder in order to prevent relapse,” he says.

But neurobiology is only part of the puzzle. People with depression may benefit from psychotherapy either alongside or following ketamine treatment. Therapy with an experienced provider can help people make sense of the experience and apply newly gained insights to their lives; it is also recommended following psychedelic treatments. “Having therapy shortly after can take advantage of this window [of increased neuroplasticity] to spark changes in perspective,” says MacMillan. While lessening of depression symptoms is the hope for many, McClure cautions that change, even the good kind, can be stressful.

What’s next?

Like other drugs, ketamine will work wonders for some people and do nothing for others (about 30% will not respond). And some people, will fall somewhere in between.

But ketamine isn’t the end of the line. Scientists like Monteggia are busy mapping out the molecular pathway and synaptic effects of many treatments including psychedelics, transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy. Both MacMillan and McClure say that these treatments are also effective for many, but it’s crucial you find the right provider.

For Monteggia, synaptic potentiation is the critical element. The more drugs or treatments scientists can find to evoke it, the more potential options for treatments. When ketamine doesn’t work for people Monteggia says, “Perhaps they have some sort of synaptic abnormality through this pathway. Perhaps they may respond to another type of drug that triggers this potentiation” via a separate route. “There are so many different reasons they may not respond and so we have to appreciate that complexity. If we can think about treatment advances for those individuals that would be a real benefit.”

In the book The Noonday Demon, Andrew Solomon, PhD, professor of clinical psychology at Columbia University Medical Center, writes, “You don’t think in depression that you’ve put on a grey veil and are seeing the world through the haze of a bad mood. You think that the veil has been taken away, the veil of happiness, and that now you’re seeing truly.”

If depression makes you think you see everything the way it truly is, ketamine shows you, even if just for a little while, everything that could be.

If you or someone you know need help, consider calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1–800–273-TALK (8255) for English, 1–888–628–9454 for Spanish.

By Lauren Tanabe PhD (Medium). Illustration: Simone Noronha.

Source: elemental.medium.com

_________________
Hey Punk, where you goin' with that passport in your hand?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Drugs
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 5:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2016 6:46 pm
Posts: 1368
Location: USA
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 93 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group