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PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 11:57 am 
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BBP is absolutely right - one should never forget Babi Yar...

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 3:01 am 
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War is hell

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hey punk, where you going with that presidential pardon in your pocket? I, I don't recall.....


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 11:55 am 
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Babi Jar ... such a shame.

http://www.spiegel.de/einestages/massak ... 13959.html

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 2:35 am 
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http://naziswithcats.tumblr.com/

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2016 7:03 pm 
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That pic of Mengele in Buenos Aires is impressive. I didn't know it was proven that he was hiding in Buenos Aires. Most of the people here don't want to face the truth about nazis hidden in Argentina.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 9:20 am 
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Newly discovered diaries from Leningrad from between 1941 and 1945, during the siege:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/ ... -world-war

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:38 am 
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Part of the Wall of Atlantic near Arcachon France. These bunkers used to be about 500m inland.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:47 pm 
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^Interesting picture, Acadian!

Conal Footwear repeals work boots after a Reddit user posted a picture of the unusual yet familiar imprints it left behind.
http://edition.cnn.com/videos/living/20 ... dlewis.cnn

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:08 pm 
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BBP wrote:
^Interesting picture, Acadian!

Conal Footwear repeals work boots after a Reddit user posted a picture of the unusual yet familiar imprints it left behind.
http://edition.cnn.com/videos/living/20 ... dlewis.cnn


Oops!

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hey punk, where you going with that presidential pardon in your pocket? I, I don't recall.....


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:21 am 
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BBP wrote:
^Interesting picture, Acadian!



They are interesting! I'm still trying to work out which actual part of the bunkers are visible - have they tipped over completely as well as been completely submerged in sand?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2017 11:31 am 
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From today until at least January 25th, Schiphol Airport (Amsterdam, Netherlands) is closed down for a few minutes every day.
Reason: in nearby Rijsselhout, the Nazis built a fake airport with a landing strip and wooden airplanes to distract the allied bombers. Around 30 bombs are to be exploded - it's very likely there's still more after that.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 8:18 am 
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Interesting interview with Kristina Söderbaum:
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/a ... as-a-devil

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:13 am 
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BBP wrote:
Interesting interview with Kristina Söderbaum:
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/a ... as-a-devil


Interesting...

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 11:47 pm 
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Kruidvat pulls a kids' colouring book after this questionable drawing was found in it:
https://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2017/04/05/kruidvat-haalt-kleurboek-met-hitler-tekening-uit-de-schappen-a1553299

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 12:23 am 
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Caputh wrote:
BBP wrote:
^Interesting picture, Acadian!



They are interesting! I'm still trying to work out which actual part of the bunkers are visible - have they tipped over completely as well as been completely submerged in sand?


in the background of the pic you can see Europes highest (105m) sand dune.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:12 am 
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I did climb that one... very high on the list of things not to do when on holiday.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 4:27 am 
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Walt Handelsman
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 11:04 am 
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Mr. Nice Guy wrote:
Walt Handelsman
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he looks like a chemical engineer, wait, nope...just another douchebag pullin' he pencil.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 12:19 am 
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Colour photos from WW2:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2017/apr/19/the-second-world-war-in-colour-in-pictures

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:34 am 
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BBP wrote:


Great photos! :D

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:26 am 
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BBP wrote:


Thank you!!!

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 2:21 pm 
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Caputh wrote:



+1


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 1:39 am 
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Dutch newspaper Trouw (itself a newspaper borne from a WW2 resistance paper) has performed interesting archival research about pillaging by allied troops. It was largely swept under the rug in any research project (EG Loe de Jong wrote a 32-volume epic about WW2 in which he spends one page on this).
https://www.trouw.nl/home/een-zwarte-pa ... ~ad14f795/

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Last edited by BBP on Tue Jun 20, 2017 7:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 3:59 am 
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a little bit of my families WW2 history popped up on stuff the other day, a little inaccurate since my father Brian's oldest brother Donald Wilkie was not born in and never saw New Zealand.....

The comments at the bottom of the article were left by a couple of my cousins and correct the stories error(s)

New Zealanders laid to rest in Thailand

LAURA WALTERS

Last updated 08:18, April 26 2017

More than 100,000 labourers and POWs lost their lives during the construction of the Thailand-Burma railway during WWII. Including at least 13 Kiwis. Many of them died during the cutting of Hellfire Pass.

New Zealand wasn't officially part of the South East Asian conflict in WWII.

Stuff reporter Laura Walters visited the graves of 13 Kiwis who were taken as POWs and forced to work on the infamous Death Railway.

Donald Talbot Wilkie was just 19 when he was captured by the Japanese.

The rest of the Wilkie family managed to Singapore's burning harbour in a tiny ship when the part opf the British Empire fell.

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Wellington-born man Donald Talbot Wilkie was one of the POWs to lose his life on the railway. He was just 23.

His late-brother Martin later described seeing the British Empire burn.

Martin spoke of crowding onto the tiny boat as the harbour literally went up in flames, after being covered with burning petrol and oil. His other brother Ian described the boat cutting a shark in half - leaving it to eat its own guts - as they steamed away.

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Donald Talbot Wilkie was just 23 when he succumbed to disease and sickness on the railway

However, Donald from Wellington's Johnsonville - did not manage to escape South East Asia, he become a Prisoner of War mining engineer on what would become known as Death Railway.

The captured Kiwi expat - one of five children - spent four years as a prisoner of war in Thailand helping to build the ambitious Thailand-Burma Railway, along with about 60,000 allied POWs and 200,000 Asian labourers.

Before the 16-month construction was completed, more than 100,000 people would die - one for every wooden sleeper. Wilkie was one of those.

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The postcards Donald Talbot Wilkie sent to his family from the camps along the railway.

He now lies in Plot 4, D12 in Thailand's Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, with a dozen other Kiwis who somehow became captured after joining the conflict with Australian troops, or joining volunteer forces in Asia.

A few POWs were shot, some died from beatings, but most died from malaria, pellagra (niacin deficiency), dysentery or beriberi (thiamine deficiency).

Wilkie was based at Tha Sao camp, one of the six POW camps along the railway, but succumbed to illness on December 9, 1943, aged 23.

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13 Kiwis have been laid to rest at Kanchanaburi War Cemetery in Thailand.

Official records say he died of dysentery but his family was told it was cardiac (wet) beriberi - a thiamine deficiency caused by the limited diet of white rice and some salted vegetables, which can lead to heart failure.

It's possible Wilkie suffered from both diseases, despite being forced to send his family postcards with reassuring fallacies like "I am well" and "I am happy".

HELL ON EARTH

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Wilkie's former resting place in Thailand, before being moved to the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery.

Workers on the 415km railway, which stretched along the border between Burma (Myanmar) and Thailand, were forced to work up to 18 hours a day. They had to work despite the heat, disease, insufficient meals and poor clothing, which sometimes consisted of just a loincloth. They also had to contend with allied bombings of the railway.

The two most infamous sections of the railway are Hellfire Pass and the bridge on the River Kwai, made famous by the 1957 movie of the same name.

The bridge is now one of Thailand's top tourist attractions along with Hellfire Pass, or Konyu Cutting.

NEW ZEALAND PRISONERS OF WAR LAID TO REST IN THAILAND'S KANCHANABURI WAR CEMETERY:

Donald Talbot Wilkie

From Johnsonville, Wellington

Died of dysentery on December 9, 1943, aged 23

Plot 4, D12

Dennis Home Morrison

From Auckland

Died of exhaustion on June 1942

Plot 2, P63

Albert Lawrence Dunningham

From Epsom, Auckland

Died of malaria in 1945 (a month before the war ended)

Plot 6, F18

Alfred John Charles Cooper

From Karori, Wellington

Died of malaria, dysentery, scabies, tropical ulcers on Decemeber 31, 1942, aged 24

Plot 8, G70

Donald Sydney Anderson

From New Zealand

Died from drowning after plane came down on September 11, 1945, aged 23

Plot 8, J11

Hughie Gray

From Wellington

Died of beriberi on January 16, 1944, aged 27

Plot 1, F34

John Hanbury Gordon Lloyd

From Dannevirke

Died of cholera on July 21, 1943, aged 40

Collective grave 1 (cremated)

Mervyn Jones

From Gisborne

Died on September 2, 1943, aged 24

Plot 1, M8

Ronald Wensley Buttle

From Nelson

Died of cholera on June 26, 1943, aged 37

Buried with Australian Infantry Battalion 2/20

Norman Gilbert Burling

From Pongaroa

Died of dysentery and malnutrition on August 25, 1943, aged 38

Collective grave 1 (cremated)

Daniel Patterson Campbell

From Palmerston

Died June 29, 1943, aged 37

Alvin Messines Dingle

From New Zealand

Died after plane was gunned down on January 24, 1942, aged 24

Collective grave 10 (cremated)

Roderick Gordon

From Dunedin

Was executed by Japanese for being a spy (British Special Forces) on December 16, 1941, aged 35

Hellfire Pass was a major cutting, carried out mostly by hand, with some jackhammers. Cutting through the hard rock slowed down the railway's construction so further POWs and workers were brought in to speed up the process. The men were forced to work into the night, with the site lit by oil lamps and bamboo fires. The sight of skeleton-like men, hacking away at the rock in the flickering light gave an image the prisoners likened to hell.

THE HEROES

Despite the many atrocities along the railway, there were efforts to help the POWs and workers.

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A photo of allied prisoner of war.

Australian doctor Lieutenant-Colonel E E Dunlop, who became known as Weary Dunlop, is an iconic figure of the railway. The doctor's untiring efforts helping the sick and injured, with limited resources, have made him a hero.

And in the 1980s, Dunlop was one of a group of ex-POWs who helped reclaim Hellfire Pass from the jungle and preserve it as a place for people to visit and pay their respects. An Australian memorial and museum now marks the site.

Boonpong Sirivejabhand, a Kanchanaburi trader, also played his part in helping the allied effort during the railway's construction.

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Visitors can catch a train from the River Kwai Bridge station.

Boonpong won a contract to supply the Japanese with things needed to construct the railway and keep the camps running. But after seeing the atrocious conditions within the camps he began to smuggle medication and messages to the POWs. He also provided information from within the camps to allied forces on the outside.

His shop still exists in Kanchanaburi and his family have turned it into a small museum, with memorabilia and pictures of the local hero.

MISSING PIECES

Image

The bridge over the Kwai river was made famous by a 1957 movie. It's now one of the country's biggest tourist attractions.

Despite the enormous loss of life caused by the railway's construction, it's one of the lesser-talked-about parts of WWII, especially for New Zealanders.

But Andrew Snow, a researcher for the Thailand-Burma Railway Centre (TBRC) has made it his mission to help connect families with the stories of their loved ones who lost their lives in Thailand during the war.

Snow's father was one of the Australian POWs who survived but died when Snow was just five, leaving him with little information about his time in Thailand.

Image

Hellfire Pass earned its name from the hell-like images created by sick, skinny men working with drills and chisels by firelight.

One evening when his sister called him to tell him about a pilgrimage, of sorts, put on by the Aussie equivalent of AA.

Snow wanted to learn more about his father's experience so travelled to Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand. But upon his return to Australia, he realised he didn't know much more about his dad's personal journey. So he started his own research then returned to Thailand in 2009 to retrace his father's steps. And he's been there ever since.

"Sometimes these things just happen at the right time."

Snow says he's connected "hundreds and hundreds and hundreds" of families with their late relatives.

"Our main point of being is to get the information to people who would struggle to find it on their own," he says.

"It's the ultimate in job satisfaction."

Snow says he doesn't do the job for the money or the fame, he does it for the satisfaction of giving families a bit of information about what their loved ones went through. And to help give them closure.

It's not uncommon for people to break down in tears when he shares his knowledge with visiting families.

"They cry because they never knew. For 70 years, they have been waiting for somebody to tell them something about what happened," he says.

"It's filling in a little piece of the puzzle about this person."

It helps people understand why their fathers or husbands or brothers or sons returned mentally scarred.

Some men were forced to burn their best friends after they died. They had to hold down screaming mates as their limbs were amputated, or tropical ulcers scraped from their legs without anesthetic.

"You can't get into your head what that would do to people...

"Once people understand what happened, they understand why Dad stands in the room and stars at the wall…. Or why he fights the Japanese on the stairs at night."

FORGOTTEN WAR

Snow says there's not a lot of knowledge about the war in the east in New Zealand and Australia.

The fall of Singapore was seen as a "great shame" by politicians and allied countries avoided placing emphasis on this part of the war.

When POWs returned to their home countries, they didn't talk about it, he says.

"For a strange reason, they were embarrassed. They were caught up with a humiliating defeat."

Many didn't join their local RSA because they had no heroic battle stories to share with other vets. This means many missed out on that support and camaraderie.

While the Australian Government had set up a museum and memorial at Hellfire Pass to honour those who worked there and lost their lives, there was still a large lack of support from governments in this area, Snow says.

A few hundred men remained in unmarked graves in Thailand's war cemeteries.

New information held by the likes of TBRC could be used to help identify these fallen men, with some help from governments, he says, adding that the money and resources to do this are not forthcoming.

CONNECTING FAMILIES

Ambassador of Thailand to New Zealand Maris Sangiampongsa says many Kiwis are unaware New Zealand soldiers lost their lives in Thailand during the war.

Very few POWs laid to rest in Kanchanaburi have been visited by their families.

Sangiampongsa says he hopes raising awareness of the wartime connection between the two countries will lead to families seeking out their fallen relatives, and hopefully paying their respects at their graves.

The New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage, which is responsible for Commonwealth War Graves (CWG) sites in New Zealand and the Pacific, said official CWG records do not show any New Zealanders as being buried in CWG cemeteries in Thailand - Chungkai or Kanchanaburi.

A spokeswoman for the ministry said its annual contribution to the CWG Commission helps pay for maintenance in the other overseas CWGC cemeteries.

There are three New Zealand servicemen are listed as being buried in the Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery in Myanmar (Burma):

Kenneth Charles Rasmussen, died June 22, 1943, aged 20

Edgar James Roland McLachlan, died November 10, 1943, aged 23

Cecil Deryck Charters, died December 25, 1943, aged 29.


Image

The telegram informing the Wilkie family of Donald Talbot Wilkie's death.


- Stuff

Comments

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Tossydog

Donald Wilkie was my uncle, the elder brother of my mother Mary & his three brothers, Martin, Ian & Brian. They were the children of Lt. Donald Cook Wilkie & Amy Talbot Wilkie & were born in Malaya, Singapore & Burma.My grandparents moved the family to Penang where they lived happy young lives until the Japanese invasion began. They fled to Singapore, leaving young Donald behind as he had enlisted with the Malay Territorial Forces. They carried only one small suitcase each. Somehow they managed to get onto one of the last ships leaving Singapore as the Japanese troops reached the city. They zig zagged torpedoes & arrived safely in Fremantle. From there they made their way to New Zealand. Our family has never forgotten the bravery of our uncle who was only 23 years of age when he died, nor the sacrifices made by his many comrades forced to work on the infamous Burma Railroad. I visited Kanchanaburi with my mother & grandmother, (Donald's mother), in the mid 70's. It was a sad & sobering experience. So many young people buried there, all who gave their lives for our freedom. Rest peacefully knowing you have never been forgotten

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KathrynAmy

Donald Cook Wilkie is my uncle. He served as part of the legendary Malay Volunteer Force. His bravery in part made it possible for his family to escape the advancing Japanese forces. My father owes him a debt, as do I, the generation born because afterwards. They escaped on one of the last boats to make it out of Penang. Thank you for commerating him in this article. Some of us have been to visit his war grave.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9182889 ... n-thailand

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 7:39 am 
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A raid in Buenos Aires, Argentina caused police to stumble onto a stash of hidden Nazi artefacts:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... ecret-room

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