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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 5:47 pm 
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I never listened to Misfits a lot. I know their sound is heavy.

There's already two metal threads.

Keep it here or there or anywhere. :smoke:

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:53 am 
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I hear that Glenn Tipton ins't doing to well. He not playing the encores anymore. :cry:

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:26 am 
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Looks like I'm doin' the metal thing one more time.


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There will be 30,000 of us packed into this soccer stadium on Sept. 14th 2019. I've got a riser seat about 1/3rd of the way back. The band plays a lot of older material, including most of the Live After Death(1984) setlist.
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Europe 2018

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Last edited by coevad on Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:48 am 
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i'd much rather go to this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whZuz5Dwtw8

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 6:59 am 
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^^ plenty of abandoned parking lots with perfectly good & re-usable concrete.

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:09 am 
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^Have fun you two. 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:36 am 
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Milton Bradley wrote:
^^ plenty of abandoned parking lots with perfectly good & re-usable concrete.

truth be told...
abandoned parking lots with perfectly good & re-usable concrete have nothing to do with my interest in going.

not to mention (as i commence to mention), that parking lot is far from abandoned.




#yes,timetravel

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:41 am 
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coevad wrote:
^Have fun you two. 8)

wait...
you won't be there too!?!?




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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:15 pm 
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Tool
Hooker With A Penis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qtIdhpw6hc

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 12:07 pm 
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Iron Maiden - For The Greater Good Of God
https://youtu.be/Ns-fQRnm9sk

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2018 12:19 pm 
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Flight Of Icarus - https://youtu.be/p4w2BZXL6Ss

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:54 am 
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OZZFEST NYE L.A.Forum

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:38 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:54 pm 
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Greetings,

I'd like to share some original work.

'Blood Ripple' - a track from the new Haiduk album - Exomancer.

Check it out!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1lW1MkZqkw

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 4:10 am 
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haiduk wrote:
Greetings,

I'd like to share some original work.

'Blood Ripple' - a track from the new Haiduk album - Exomancer.

Check it out!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1lW1MkZqkw

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meh.

music = a bit too mechanical and shiny.
vocals = run of the mill cookie monster predictability.
possible genre title = cheese march metal.

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2019 5:33 am 
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Dave Mustaine: Megadeth frontman diagnosed with cancer
By Mark Savage BBC music reporter

https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-48674208

Megadeth have cancelled most of their upcoming tour as frontman Dave Mustaine undergoes treatment for throat cancer.

Mustaine announced his diagnosis on the metal band's website, but said he was optimistic about his treatment plan.

"It's clearly something to be respected and faced head on - but I've faced obstacles before," he said.

"I'm working closely with my doctors, and we've mapped out a treatment plan which they feel has a 90% success rate. Treatment has already begun."

Although the majority of Megadeth's tour dates have been cancelled, the recently-announced "Megacruise" will take place as scheduled in October "and the band will be a part of it in some form", Mustaine wrote.

Billed as "five days and nights of heavy metal decadence and debauchery," the cruise is due to feature concerts, masterclasses and meet-and-greets with the band.

Mustaine added that the group would continue to work on the follow-up to their Grammy-winning 2016 album Dystopia while he receives treatment.

"I'm so thankful for my whole team - family, doctors, band members, trainers, and more," he said. "I'll keep everyone posted."

'Cancer doesn't stand a chance'

Fans and fellow artists were quick to send messages wishing Mustaine the best.

Anthrax's Scott Ian said: "Please join me in sending all of our most powerful positive mind bullets to my brother Dave. You got this my friend, you can beat it - like you beat me in arm-wrestling! Kick its ass and get healthy!"

"Prayers and positive vibes out to my friend. Cancer doesn't stand a chance fighting this guy!" added Mike Portnoy of Dream Theater and Sons of Apollo.

"Tout le monde is with you, Dave," said Lacuna Coil frontwoman Cristina Scabbia. "We all love you and are with you."

Mustaine's Megadeth bandmate David Ellefson wrote: "Praying for my friend Dave Mustaine for a full and speedy recovery!"

The star's daughter, Electra, added: "I would do and give anything for this man. Dad, I love you so so much. You've taught me what love should look like, taught me reliability, perseverance, commitment... and mostly, strength.

"On days when you can't, I will give you mine."

Mustaine formed Megadeth in 1983 after an acrimonious split with Metallica, where he was the original lead guitarist.

The band were pioneers of what came to be known as "thrash metal", playing faster and louder than their contemporaries, with an emphasis on Mustaine's lightning-fast guitar skills.

Their independently-released debut Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good! won them a major recording contract with Capitol Records, who released the platinum-selling Peace Sells... But Who's Buying? in 1986.

The band's early success was marred by Mustaine's drug addiction, culminating in an arrest for driving under the influence in 1990.
Nerve damage

After entering a rehabilitation programme and getting clean, Mustaine refocused his attention on the band, culminating in the release of 1992's Countdown to Extinction - the band's most commercially-successful album, and a sign that metal still had an audience in the midst of grunge.

The album's title track also won an award from the Humane Society in 1993 for raising awareness for animal rights issues.

However, the band nearly came to an end in 2002, when Mustaine fell asleep with his arm over the back of a chair - causing severe radial nerve damage.

Doctors told him he might regain 80% of his movement back - but he'd never play guitar again. Undeterred, the star went through 18 months of painful therapy and got himself back on stage by 2004.

Their last album, Dystopia, was released in 2016, and the title track earned the band their first-ever Grammy, for best metal performance.

Earlier this year, Megadeth released the career retrospective Warheads on Foreheads, and were set to celebrate the 35th anniversary of Killing Is My Business... and Business Is Good! before Mustaine's cancer diagnosis.

In his statement, the frontman vowed he would be "back on the road asap".


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:07 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:32 am 
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Bruce turned 61 last week.

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sun Aug 11, 2019 1:12 pm 
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Finland’s Heavy Metal Knitting Championship Is The Real Purl Jam
One contestant noted, “It’s ridiculous but it’s so much fun.”

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/heavy-metal-knitting-finland_n_5d27b8bae4b0060b11e9c9a1
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JOENSUU, Finland (AP) — Armed with needles and a yarn of wool, teams of avid knitters danced Thursday to the deafening sounds of drums beating and guitars slashing at the first-ever Heavy Metal Knitting World Championship in eastern Finland.

With stage names such as Woolfumes, Bunny Bandit and 9″ Needles, the participants shared a simple goal: to showcase their knitting skills while dancing to heavy metal music in the most outlandish way possible.

“It’s ridiculous but it’s so much fun,” said Heather McLaren, an engineering PhD student who traveled from Scotland for a shot at the “world title.” ″When I saw there was a combination of heavy metal and knitting, I thought ‘that’s my niche.’”

The competition took place in a packed square in the small town of Joensuu close to the Russian border. An eclectic group of around 200 people watched the performances, from families with young children and elderly to the less conspicuous heavy metal fans donning leather-jackets and swirling their long hair to the fast-paced rhythm of the music.

A niche musical genre in many countries, heavy metal is more mainstream in Finland, with several bands household names frequently played on the radio. Its popularity grew further in 2006 when the Finnish band Lordi won the Eurovision Song Contest dressed as monsters.

Today, Finland has the highest number of heavy metal bands per capita in the world with over 50 bands per 100,000 people. Even former U.S. President Barack Obama commented on this rich tradition while welcoming his Finnish counterpart to the White House in 2016.

“In Finland it’s very dark in the wintertime, so maybe it’s in our roots. We’re a bit melancholic, like the rhythm,” said Mark Pyykkonen, one of three people judging the competition.

While combining heavy metal music with knitting might not seem an obvious match, the organizers say it’s similar to other unusual events in Finland, such as world championships in air guitar, swamp soccer, and wife carrying — Finnish ways of goofing around and making the most of the long summer nights in these northern latitudes.

“We have such dark and long winters,” said Mari Karjalainen, one of the founders of the event. “This really gives us lots of time to plan for our short summers and come up with silly ideas.”

Thursday’s competition saw participants from nine countries, including the United States, Japan, and Russia, put on inspired performances full of theatrics, passion and drama and the jury struggled to agree upon a winner.

Finally, it was a Japanese performance by the five-person Giga Body Metal team that clinched the title with a show featuring crazy sumo wrestlers and a man dressed in a traditional Japanese kimono.

“It’s a great release,” said Elise Schut, a 35-year-old nurse from Michigan who performed with her 71-year-old mother and 64-year-old family friend, Beth Everson, who added that “knitting is such a meditative activity but now it’s energetic and heart pumping.”

After the success and fun of this first championship, the organizers announced they would repeat it next summer, adding Heavy Metal Knitting to the already long list of weird and yet hilarious Finland summer gatherings.


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 6:36 am 
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Celtic Frost’s Tom G. Warrior says Metallica butchered his band’s song, criticizes James Hetfield

by Jon Hadusek
on August 16, 2019, 1:34pm
https://consequenceofsound.net/2019/08/celtic-frost-tom-g-warrior-metallica-butchered-song/

"I don't support people who go hunting bears for a hobby"

Celtic Frost leader Tom G. Warrior had choice words for Metallica in a new interview with Rolling Stone, lambasting the band for Kirk Hammett and Rob Trujillo’s cover of “The Usurper” at a Swiss concert earlier this year. Warrior also criticized Metallica’s James Hetfield for “hunting bears for a hobby.”

“They butchered it, and it was humiliating,” said Warrior of Metallica’s live rendition of the Celtic Frost classic. “Why don’t they leave their millionaire fingers off it? They’ve long lost the ability to play true metal in my opinion. Maybe I should go onstage and do a really miserable version of ‘Hit the Lights’ with, like, 200 mistakes to set the balance.”

In the interview, Warrior — a vegan and a proponent of animal rights — also called out Metallica’s James Hetfield, who is a member of the National Rifle Association and an avid hunter. Hetfield also provided narration for the History channel series The Hunt, which is about hunting the Kodiak brown bear, and moved out of his native Bay Area because of “political elitism.”

Celtic Frost leader Tom G. Warrior had choice words for Metallica in a new interview with Rolling Stone, lambasting the band for Kirk Hammett and Rob Trujillo’s cover of “The Usurper” at a Swiss concert earlier this year. Warrior also criticized Metallica’s James Hetfield for “hunting bears for a hobby.”

“They butchered it, and it was humiliating,” said Warrior of Metallica’s live rendition of the Celtic Frost classic. “Why don’t they leave their millionaire fingers off it? They’ve long lost the ability to play true metal in my opinion. Maybe I should go onstage and do a really miserable version of ‘Hit the Lights’ with, like, 200 mistakes to set the balance.”

In the interview, Warrior — a vegan and a proponent of animal rights — also called out Metallica’s James Hetfield, who is a member of the National Rifle Association and an avid hunter. Hetfield also provided narration for the History channel series The Hunt, which is about hunting the Kodiak brown bear, and moved out of his native Bay Area because of “political elitism.”

“This is completely personal … but even if they had done a fantastic job [covering the song], I could puke all over it because I don’t support people who go hunting bears for a hobby,” Warrior added. “I cannot respect a person like that, even if it’s a genius musician.”

Tom G. Warrior started Celtic Frost in 1984, but the band hasn’t been active since 2008. He recently started a new outfit called Triumph of Death, who perform classics from his pre-Celtic Frost band Hellhammer.

Needless to say, Metallica probably won’t be covering anymore of Warrior’s music any time soon. Check out Hammett and Trujillo’s rendition below.

https://youtu.be/xtUh1QHJGP0


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 5:27 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 3:02 pm 
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Hear Motorhead Frontman Lemmy Kilmister’s Lost Country Duet ‘The Mask’
Track will appear on Lynda Kay’s upcoming album Black & Gold

By Kory Grow
August 22, 2019 4:09PM ET

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4LKdEcDGdM&feature=youtu.be

Lemmy Kilmister started writing the outlaw country song “The Mask” in 1979 — the same year he put out the screaming, hard-rock albums Overkill and Bomber with his band Motörhead — but didn’t finish it until three decades later. Now, a decade after that – and a couple of years after his death – the song is finally seeing the light of day.

Kilmister completed the song in 2009 with country singer Lynda Kay, who plays herself on the Amazon Prime series Goliath. The recording was thought to be lost but was recently rediscovered. It features Kilmister singing in a way that shows off his full voice, as opposed to the gruff grunts of Motörhead, and it is now the lead single off Kay’s upcoming album Black & Gold. A rare heart-on-sleeve love song by Kilmister, the lyrics concern a couple whose “love was doomed.” The LP is due out tomorrow, August 23rd.

In other Motörhead news, the music that Kilmister actually did put out in 1979 will be getting a reappraisal in a new box set, titled 1979, that collects the Overkill and Bomber albums along with live performances and outtakes. The collection is due out October 25th.

Shortly after Kilmister’s 2015 death, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich paid tribute to him in an interview with Rolling Stone. “Lemmy was like a godfather, a parental figure,” he said. “He was someone you felt completely safe with. You were never judged. You were never intellectualized. You were never questioned. You were always just welcomed in to whatever level that they were capable of. … It made you feel like you were a part of something that was so much bigger than you, and it was such a safe and invigorating place for kids like myself, because it gave us a purpose.”


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:11 am 
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Eyehategod Drummer Aaron Hill Knifed and Robbed in Mexico
July 8th, 2019 at 10:33am
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https://www.metalsucks.net/2019/07/08/eyehategod-drummer-aaron-hill-knifed-and-robbed-in-mexico/

Eyehategod’s Aaron Hill has been assaulted and robbed in Guadalajara, Mexico, informador.mx reports.

The 35-year-old drummer was attacked by three men and a woman not far from the Forum Independence, the very venue where the band was scheduled to play. The assailants reportedly brandished a knife, and left Hill with a five centimeter (roughly two inches) wound on his left side. Luckily, he’s said to be doing okay.

According to the show’s promoter, Show No Mercy, the band “have a driver at their disposal,” but given the close proximity of the group’s hotel to the venue, Hill opted to walk.

You can read Show No Mercy’s entire statement on the matter below (please excuse the poor English translation). Everyone here at MetalSucks is relieved to hear Aaron is alright, and we wish him a full and speedy recovery!

“Today while Aaron Hill walked to the venue he suffered a robbery. They have a driver at their disposal; but they were touring the city all afternoon so he preferred to walk to the venue, for his hotel is very close; when 4 people, 2 Blocks, intercepted and took away their belongings While one of them threatened him and made him a 5 cm wound on the left side. He is well, however it was not possible to continue with the show.

“It should be mentioned that neither forum independence, nor nms, nor Aaron are responsible for this event; for it is not possible that you can not walk safe on the street willing to enjoy your Sunday.

“We appreciate the support of red cross and police Guadalajara for the attentions.

“Enrique Alfaro we hope that this crime will not go unpunished and we can enjoy our city with tranquility.

“During the week we will let you know the refund process.”


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2019 7:31 am 
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On the Sinister Majesty of Black Sabbath
With a new box set collecting the original lineup’s first eight albums, we pay tribute to the lords of this world
By Kory Grow

September 12, 2019 1:10PM ET
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When Black Sabbath first attempted to tour America in 1970, they had a Hell of a time. “We had to face the mayor of [every] town,” drummer Bill Ward once recalled. “We were banned all the time. They were afraid of us. They thought we were going to put a spell on you.”

Although Mick Jagger and Sammy Davis, Jr. had already publicly flirted with satanism, Black Sabbath — whose members all wore crosses to ward off evil — were much too scary for the United States. Their self-titled debut album sported a witchy woman on its cover, their eponymous song detailed an ill-fated dalliance with a demon (“Please God help me!”), and, in the U.K., their label took things one hooved step further by printing an inverted cross on the inside sleeve with a passage about a dead, black swan floating upside down in a lake as a preamble for what was inside. The group had nicked its name from a 1963 Boris Karloff horror movie, and both its name and fright-flick lyrics sparked confusion and new mythologies nearly everywhere they went.

Over the years, rumors have abounded that Church of Satan founder Anton Szandor LaVey hosted a parade in their honor in San Francisco that year (not true, the Church’s High Priest, Magus Peter H. Gilmore tells Rolling Stone — though there was a Sabbath float in a gay pride parade in the Golden Gate City that year), and then there were whisperings that the Manson Family were fans of the band, which makes no sense since the Tate-LaBianca murders were a year earlier. And then there were the misunderstandings that had nothing to do with black magic: Ozzy Osbourne recalled in his autobiography how when the band played Philadelphia, a group of African American concertgoers were disappointed the band didn’t live up to their expectations. “You guys ain’t black,” one of them told Osbourne. Black Sabbath were a mystery, and it was the mythology of Black Sabbath that built heavy metal.

Many bands can claim responsibility for the genre’s bludgeoning guitar lines and intensely intense vocals (Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin are obvious go-to’s, and critic Lester Bangs once curiously cited the Velvet Underground’s White Light/White Heat as a starting point), but the group most responsible for metal as the world knows it today is Black Sabbath. The song “Black Sabbath,” the first track on their first album, begins with eerie sound effects of rain and church bells (a brilliantly gothic detail that foreshadowed the darkness to come) before exploding with guitarist Tony Iommi’s lumbering, Godzilla stomp of a riff and Osbourne pleading to heaven to deliver him from Satan — lyrics he based on a nightmare bassist Geezer Butler had had. They wanted to feel scared and they wanted you to feel scared. Over the next eight years, they used that song as a prototype for new sounds — speeding it up, funking it up, stretching it out, wringing the blues out of it, inverting it into lucious folk music — essentially creating the Rosetta Stone for metal with their early discography.

The band’s first eight albums, the ones made by Osbourne, Iommi, Butler, and Ward, are still vital, enigmatic, and inspiring. On an album like Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, the band transitions from the blunt-force riff pugilism of the frightening title cut (dig that almost Black Flaggy breakdown, “Nowhere to run to … “) to the intricate, contemplative “Sabbra Cadabra” within a few minutes — and it makes perfect sense.

Those albums, compiled into Rhino’s new limited-edition LP box set, The Vinyl Collection: 1970 – 1978, represent the multifaceted essence of not just Black Sabbath but metal and hard rock as a whole, proving why they weren’t just the first but also the greatest metal band. And vinyl is the best way to experience the music since you can ponder the quixotic artwork (who is the witch on the cover of Black Sabbath? why are there airmen on Never Say Die? what was Bill Ward smoking when he wore see-through red tights for the cover of Sabotage?) and feel the pacing and admire the grooves of the music as the LP spins on the turntable. (And to sweeten people’s appreciation, the box set also includes replica tour programs from the Seventies, which oddly include Osbourne and Iommi sniping at each other in the interviews within — it shows how the prickly pair made the band’s chemistry work.)

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But it’s the music that remains most powerful. You can hear the breakneck thrashing of Metallica and Slayer in “Children of the Grave” and “Symptom of the Universe,” the manic riffs of the Sex Pistols and Ramones are steeped in “Paranoid,” and the downer-rock groundwork of grunge reverberates through songs like “War Pigs” and “Into the Void.” Although Black Sabbath went on to record brilliant albums with Ronnie James Dio and Ian Gillan in the Eighties, the group’s original lineup sowed the seeds for a whole musical culture in the previous decade on their first eight LPs.

The reason the music was so game-changing — and so excellent — was because it was a reflection of who these four men were offstage. The band members have each made much of their working-class backgrounds, growing up in post-War Birmingham, England. Iommi accidentally lopped off the fingertips of his fretting hand, forcing him to relearn the guitar and draw inspiration from Gypsy-jazz virtuoso Django Reinhardt. Osbourne came from a big family and worked as a car-horn tuner and in a slaughterhouse before spending time in jail for burglary; eventually his dad bought him a PA, setting him on the road to music making. Butler grew up in an Irish-Catholic household but suffered from undiagnosed depression causing him to feel like an outcast. And Ward had a humble upbringing where his parents encouraged his drumming. When they formed Black Sabbath (né Earth, smartly né the Polka Tulk Blues Band) in 1968, they all were avowed fans of the blues and heavy rock like Jimi Hendrix and Cream but as Butler once said, “We just took it one step heavier.”

The secret to Black Sabbath’s sound in the beginning was that they wanted to be big. The first original song they they remember writing was “Wicked World,” a skittery blues number about what an abomination the planet was in 1969 with poor people dying in the gutter. But it’s on the second song they wrote, “Black Sabbath,” where they consecrated their approach. Iommi and Butler (formerly a guitar player) colluded to make the riff sound massive, like more than the two of them playing at once, and Ward approached his instrument not so much like Ginger Baker but like an expressionist painter, adding drama to each of Osbourne’s pleas for salvation. The first single they put out, included in the box set as a bonus cut on its mono-only Monomania compilation, was a cover of American hard rockers Crow’s “Evil Woman,” a chunky blues number advising cruel-hearted ladies to steer clear of the band members. It was two years after Fleetwood Mac’s “Black Magic Woman” (and the same year as Santana’s) and two years before Eagles’ “Witchy Woman” — and none of this means anything since Black Sabbath courted every kind of women throughout the Seventies, regardless of their evil affiliations.

And then there was their look. If the peace and love generation dressed themselves like an acid trip, Black Sabbath were like a PCP nightmare with their garish clothes, Osbourne’s fringe jacket, and their mid-Seventies wizard garb. They looked as scary as they sounded. You knew that their racket was unwittingly born of a beautiful dysfunction, a natural urge that came out of the four of them together.

Music critic Lester Bangs infamously closed his Rolling Stone review of the album Black Sabbath (which was incidentally released in the U.K. on a Friday the 13th) with the punchline that Sabbath were “just like Cream! But worse.” He eventually became a fan as the group became more nuanced, but he missed out on the directness that separated them from Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce. Where Cream had a song like “Sunshine of Your Love,” Sabbath used a similar riff for Black Sabbath’s “N.I.B.” and infused it with dark psychedelia and a thicker wallop. Their music was much more barebones and much more like a slap in the face; Cream were genteel London noblemen by comparison.

Butler wrote lyrics about H.P. Lovecraft–inspired trippiness (“Behind the Wall of Sleep”), astral projection and love (“Planet Caravan”), war (“War Pigs,” “Hand of Doom,” “Children of the Grave”), and feeling like an outcast (“Paranoid”). He avowed the band’s love of Jesus Christ in the wake of a British sorcerer allegedly hexing them (“After Forever”) and his love of drugs (“Sweet Leaf”). “Into the Void,” one of the band’s heaviest early songs, was an elegy for a dying planet: “Back on earth the flame of life burns low/Everywhere is misery and woe/Pollution kills the air, the land, the sea/Man prepares to meet his destiny.” It was the opposite of megahits in 1971 like Three Dog Night’s “Joy to the World” and the Bee Gees’ “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart.”

“Sabbath was everything the Sixties weren’t,” Metallica frontman James Hetfield once beamed. “Their music was so cool because it was completely anti-hippie.”

In their defiance, Sabbath embraced nuance. Just look at the grooves of 1970’s Paranoid or 1971’s Master of Reality, and the folky ballads are immediately noticeable next to ragers like “Lord of This World,” as are effects like the gurgly voiced “I am Iron Man” that opens one of their most famous songs or the choking weed cough of “Sweet Leaf.” It’s a paradox of detail and dudeliness. A mono version of the Master track “Into the Void” on Monomania is even thicker and heavier than the one on the record, and you can feel the power they were starting to tap into with their music on the way the verse riff on “After Forever” returns with an extra dimension of bass-guitar smackdown. They were masters of their own reality.

On 1972’s unimaginatively titled Vol. 4, the group broke new ground and recorded some of their most creative sounds. It was the band’s proud cocaine moment (“We wish to thank the great COKE-Cola Company of Los Angeles,” read the liner notes) and they paid tribute to their powdery muse on “Snowblind.” But there was a new depth of sound on the weighty “Wheels of Confusion” and thumping “Supernaut.” The ballad “Changes” featured a piano and a mellotron with an orchestral string sound, and it was disarmingly fragile. The record closes with “Under the Sun,” a tune that grinds slower and slower and slower as it ends until you’re looking up from the dirt. “Life is one long overdose,” Osbourne sings.

The group had leveled up, and its music would grow more and more complex on 1973’s Sabbath Bloody Sabbath and their last masterpiece, 1975’s Sabotage (which sports a deceptively corny album cover despite the impossibly hard-hitting riff on “The Thrill of It All”). Sabbath Bloody Sabbath’s “Killing Yourself to Live” is like a Black Sabbath glossary that finds Osbourne screeching, “I’m telling you, believe in me” — and you want to with all the blues riffs, Sgt. Pepper psychedelia and its surprising breakdown. In the middle of it he whispers “smoke it” in one speaker, and “get high” in the other, and you don’t know if it’s peer pressure or an admonition. That album’s “Who Are You?” is a buoyant synth track Osbourne dreamt up, complete with a proto-industrial rattle, and the record as a whole variously features Iommi playing synth, flute, organ, bagpipes, and piano, while Ward expanded his repertoire to bongos and timpani.

And on Sabotage, they invert the folky, Latin jazz jam at the end of “Symptom of the Universe” by pairing one of their heaviest-ever songs, “Hole in the Sky,” with a quirky acoustic jam called “Don’t Start Too Late.” And once again, you can see in the grooves how complicated a song like the gloomy “Megalomania” on Sabotage is by the way the rungs contort. “Symptom,” too, contains some of Butler’s trippiest lyrics, in which he asks you to “take [him] through the centuries to supersonic years” and “swim the magic ocean I’ve been crying all these years,” making it one of the band’s biggest headfucks. The megagothic “Supertzar” is an instrumental piece Iommi dreamt up, complete with a 55-voice choir, and it was majestic enough for the band to use it to open their shows on the tours that followed.

Drink, drugs, and too many years on the road got the better of them on their two final releases of their initial run, 1976’s Technical Ecstasy, and 1978’s ironically titled swan song for Osbourne, Never Say Die!, and the music is noticeably less inspired but still rocks as hard (if not a little harder) than Led Zeppelin’s two final albums. Oddly, the Never Say Die! single “A Hard Road,” with its slick swagger got them back on Top of the Pops, eight years after they played “Paranoid” on the U.K. music show, making them pop stars. But the intra-band bacchanalia proved too much for the group and they oustered Osbourne for his herculean drug use (even though they were all using), ultimately giving him the opportunity to defy all odds and become a bigger solo star than the band in the Eighties all while they started over with Ronnie James Dio and inspired a new wave of heavy metal fans with their Heaven and Hell album.

At their peak — whether that’s their first trilogy of heavy-hitting albums or the technical ecstasy of their work in the mid-Seventies — Black Sabbath were the touchstone for everything that followed. Although the band members have each scoffed at the metal tag over the years, they’ve never denied their influence on the genre and the bands whom they have inspired.

In the five decades since they formed, Black Sabbath’s music has been interpreted in many different ways. Metallica reveled in the complexity of their mid-Seventies recordings. Megadeth zeroed in on the hits (“Paranoid” and “Never Say Die”) and thrashed them up. Pantera surprisingly tackled the ballad “Planet Caravan.” Van Halen, who went out on their first big tour supporting Sabbath, once flirted with calling themselves Rat Salad after an instrumental on Paranoid. Cypress Hill, Ice-T and Busta Rhymes all sampled Sabbath. And the band Sleep is basically a Sabbath tribute band, formed at a time when the band was less fashionable. Moreover, Weezer, Green Day, Charles Bradley, Blondie, Foo Fighters, Replacements, the Roots, Beastie Boys and Courtney Love, among dozens of others, have covered their songs. Without these eight records, music would sound drastically different.

Weirdly, some of the band members don’t fully appreciate the work they put into their records. “I was always disappointed with our albums because of the fact that we were a fucking great live band,” drummer Bill Ward said in the liner notes to the 1998 live album Reunion. “I felt we always lost something by trying to record what we did.” But long after the original lineup fell apart, it’s what they put on their LPs that cemented their legend.

Since 1979, the original members of Black Sabbath have reunited and broken up and carried on with solo records. Everything finally came full circle in 2013, when they released 13 (sadly without Ward and not included in the box set) showing they still had it in them to conjure their dark spirits for tracks like “Damaged Soul” and “God Is Dead?” that could have come out anytime in the Seventies. The album was a worldwide smash, notching the Number One positions in the U.S. and U.K. The determination, and the willingness to work through their differences, harks back to a lyric on Vol. 4’s “Under the Sun,” and one that captures the spirit of the band:

“Just believe in yourself you know you really shouldn’t have to pretend/
“Don’t let those empty people try to interfere with your mind/
“Just live your life and leave them all behind”


Long may this message echo through centuries into supersonic years. Hail Black Sabbath, Lords of This World!


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Fucking Metal!
PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 5:17 pm 
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Iron Maiden kicked ass as usual last Saturday!

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