Zappa.com

The Official Frank Zappa Messageboards
It is currently Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:40 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 79 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 5:48 pm
Posts: 29948
Location: Somewhere in time
I love these cases, especially when everyone was so sure they were guilty they used them in a political ad, just more proof that the death penalty needs to be rescinded... :idea:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:27 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2003 3:45 am
Posts: 11770
Location: EINDHOVEN
Poor guys... :(

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2746321/Jack-Ripper-unmasked-How-amateur-sleuth-used-DNA-breakthrough-identify-Britains-notorious-criminal-126-years-string-terrible-murders.html
I can't believe it, really... although it's true that police swiped evidence of the Jack The Ripper-case to keep as souvenir...

_________________
Image
Join the PackardGoose forum! Send me a PM!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 4:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
^^
Very cool, or is it a conspiracy to clear the crown name? :mrgreen:







Image

JELLYFISH - Fast, Parallel k-mer Counting for DNA

JELLYFISH is a tool for fast, memory-efficient counting of k-mers in DNA. A k-mer is a substring of length k, and counting the occurrences of all such substrings is a central step in many analyses of DNA sequence. JELLYFISH can count k-mers using an order of magnitude less memory and an order of magnitude faster than other k-mer counting packages by using an efficient encoding of a hash table and by exploiting the "compare-and-swap" CPU instruction to increase parallelism.

JELLYFISH is a command-line program that reads FASTA and multi-FASTA files containing DNA sequences. It outputs its k-mer counts in an binary format, which can be translated into a human-readable text format using the "jellyfish dump" command. See the documentation below for more details.

Guillaume Marcais and Carl Kingsford, A fast, lock-free approach for efficient parallel counting of occurrences of k-mers. Bioinformatics (2011) 27(6): 764-770 (first published online January 7, 2011) doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btr011

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2015 7:28 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Row over human embryo gene editing

Image

A controversial Chinese study that reveals genes in human embryos have been modified for the first time has sparked fierce debate.

The research looked at genetic editing techniques - which in theory can be used to snip out faulty bits of genetic material that would otherwise lead to serious inherited diseases.

This is the first time it is known to have been attempted on early human embryos. But the results suggest it can cause new, unintended genetic errors.

Experts are questioning whether the procedure - which, if taken further, could lead to genetic changes being passed on to future generations - has crossed ethical, moral and legal lines.
Discarded embryos

The study was published in the less well-known journal Protein and Cell, by a team of scientists from the Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou.

There are claims that more established journals such as Nature and Science rejected it on ethical grounds.

Researchers say they collected faulty human embryos incapable of leading to live births, from discarded stores at fertility clinics.

Using gene editing complexes they then tried to cut out and replace a gene responsible for a serious blood disorder.

But in many cases the procedure failed. And in some embryos, new genetic mutations, so-called off-target effects, arose in unexpected places.

Scientists suspect this was down to the gene editing technology working in places it was not intended to.

Researchers concluded these off-target effects "need to be investigated thoroughly" before any attempts to take the procedure to the clinic.
'Unpredictable effects'

There have been strong reactions to this paper on several grounds.

Many focus on what would happen if embryos modified in this way were implanted in wombs and allowed to develop into live births.

This could mean dangerous, newly created genetic changes are passed on from one generation to the next.

And others argue the technology could be exploited to alter genes for cosmetic reasons.

Dr Yalda Jamshidi, at St George's University Hospital, said: "In theory, replacing the defective gene with a healthy one would be the ideal solution.

"Researchers have been working on developing techniques to accomplish this for many years.

"However, altering genes in human embryos can have unpredictable effects on future generations."

Others have questioned whether these techniques are even legal under current laws.

Prof Robin Lovell Badge, at the Crick Institute, says such procedures could be legal in the UK if granted a licence after careful consideration by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority.

But it would be illegal to then implant the embryos into a woman for further development.

Meanwhile in the US, it would not be possible to do this with federal funding. But finances from private companies and charities could be used in states that do not ban the procedure, he says.

As gene editing methods become simpler and more widely available, some scientists argue firm global governance is needed.

And they say regulations must make clear the difference between gene editing used in reproductive cells rather than cells that are not passed on.

Several trials are underway attempting to modify non-reproductive cells as an approach to treat cancer, for example.

But how international regulations would be enforced on technology that is easily accessible and developing at a fast pace, is unclear.

Some experts have gone even further, calling for a moratorium on further studies while science and society decide how far the technology should be allowed to go.
Genetic hopes

But despite the uproar, not everyone is against the research.

They argue that studies which bring us incrementally closer to eliminating life-limiting genetic diseases must be allowed to continue.

Prof Lovell Badge says he is fully supportive of research being carried out on early human embryos in laboratory settings - especially on embryos that are not required for reproduction and would otherwise be discarded.

If the techniques work, he says, there are many questions that could be asked about the role of specific genes in early human development.

And should the technology be proven safe and effective with further trials, the nature of the argument could change.

Prof Darren Griffin, at the University of Kent, argues if these obstacles are overcome, the next consideration is whether it crosses a moral boundary to apply it to patients.

"Equally, some will ask if the procedure is safe, do we have a moral imperative to make sure that we do it?"

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32446954

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 10:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 10:42 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

Image

Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2015 5:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Why does it hurt when I pee?

'Super-gonorrhoea' outbreak: Everything you need to know

As an outbreak of a drug-resistant strain of gonorrhoea spreads, Dr Verity Sullivan explains everything you need to know about the infection


Image
Electron micrograph of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, also know as [img]Gonococococcus[/img]

Gonorrhoea. The very word puts a shiver down most spines. But what actually is it and do you need to be worried about it?

Otherwise known as “The Clap,” (thought to come from the French word “clapier” which means brothel or because an old-school treatment was to “clap” a gonorrhoea infected penis with a heavy object in order to cure the infection *scream*) gonorrhea is a bacterial infection that can be passed on through unprotected oral, vaginal and anal sex.

It’s a clever little bug that doesn’t always show symptoms and I see patients daily who carry the infection without even realising. And numbers are on the up. A report by Public Health England has shown cases of gonorrhoea to have risen by 19 per cent in 2014 amongst heterosexuals and a whopping 32 per cent in gay men.

A new strain

Gonorrhoea requires two antibiotics given together to effectively treat, which must be accessed at a sexual health clinic or GP. One is given by an injection (ceftriaxone) and another in the form of tablets (azithromycin). But a new strain of the bug which is resistant to the azithromycin component of this treatment has been identified in 16 patients in the North of England, raising a national alert.

Whilst 16 people doesn’t sound like a lot, there’s no doubt that more people carrying the strain are yet to be identified. And with plenty of people having unprotected sex, it’s a no brainer that the bug will be passed on to more. The prospect of no effective treatment for an infection that affects over 30,000 people a year is terrifying for professionals and patients alike. Untreated gonorrhoea can lead to a whole host of problems if left to its own devices, such as chronic pain and infertility.

The cases identified up North are being treated with an alternative medication but the onus now is on the public to take their sexual health seriously.

So how can you do your bit?

Firstly be aware of the symptoms of gonorrhoea. For the ladies this includes a change in your regular discharge, any unusual bleeding down below, pain during sex or when having a pee. For the gents: discharge from the penis or bottom, pain when peeing and pain in the testicles. If you’re showing any of these symptoms, don’t delay: head to your sexual health clinic and get it checked out.

If you don’t have symptoms, remember gonorrhoea may still be lurking and testing is super straight-forward: just a urine sample for the boys (and a swab from the throat or bottom if you’re gay) and a self-taken vaginal swab for the girls. Getting a sexual health check is free and straight forward: have a look at NHS Choices, Family Planning Association or sxt.org to find a clinic near you and remember your GP may also offer tests.

If you’re found to have gonorrhoea, further tests will be taken to look at the infection more closely and to ensure we’re giving you the right treatment. We’ll then repeat a test in 2-weeks’ time to check that it’s all cleared up. We can also give you advice on telling your recent sexual partners, as they will need to be tested and treated too.

As for protecting yourself for the future, I can’t stress enough the importance of wearing condoms with new partners (you can get a wide selection for free from your local clinic or GP, including latex-free options for sensitive bits) and having regular sexual health checks if a new set of genitals comes into the mix. You’ll be doing your bit to safeguard the health of yourself and the public, which is really something to be proud of.

Image
Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea.
They can make your balls feel like a pair of maracas...


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/11874559/Super-gonorrhoea-outbreak-Everything-you-need-to-know.html

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 9:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 7:29 pm
Posts: 10177
Image


the vapor shark dna 200 is a power regulated digital switch-mode dc-dc
converter for personal vaporizers; the dna 200 runs from a 3 cell lithium
polymer battery, and features cell-by-cell battery monitoring and integrated
balance charger

the usb port and software can be used to customize or monitor the user
experience; the most advanced personal vaporizer controller ever made; the
vapor shark dna 200 is vaping down to a science

features
• patented wattage control
• temperature protection
• preheat
• digital user controls
• oled screen
• onboard buttons
• synchronous rectification for maximum battery life
• minimal heat generation
• stealth mode
• power locked mode
• resistance lock
• 8 profiles
• cell balancer
• onboard 25 amp smt fuse


specifications
output power: 1 watt - 200 watts
output voltage: 0.5 volts - 9.0 volts
output current: 50.0 amps, continuous
output current: 55.0 amps, instantaneous peak
temp sensing wire: 0.10 ohm cold
kanthal wire: 0.20 ohm
temp limit: 200°f - 600°f
input voltage: 9.0 volts - 11.1 volts
input current: 0.5 amps - 23.0 amps
screen power: 18 milliamps
power down: 25 µamps
efficiency: 97%
board weight: 15 g
footprint: 0.71" x 2.80"
thickness: 0.32"
screen size: 0.91" oled



Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 2:16 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Genetic Engineering Will Change Everything Forever – CRISPR-Cas9
Designer babies, the end of diseases, genetically modified humans that never age. Outrageous things that used to be science fiction are suddenly becoming reality. The only thing we know for sure is that things will change irreversibly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAhjPd4uNFY

^^
Check this first, so you can understand the implications of these breaking news:

CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time

The move by Chinese scientists could spark a biomedical duel between China and the United States.

David Cyranoski

15 November 2016


Image
Gene-editing could improve the ability of immune cells to attack cancer.

A Chinese group has become the first to inject a person with cells that contain genes edited using the revolutionary CRISPR–Cas9 technique.

On 28 October, a team led by oncologist Lu You at Sichuan University in Chengdu delivered the modified cells into a patient with aggressive lung cancer as part of a clinical trial at the West China Hospital, also in Chengdu.

Earlier clinical trials using cells edited with a different technique have excited clinicians. The introduction of CRISPR, which is simpler and more efficient than other techniques, will probably accelerate the race to get gene-edited cells into the clinic across the world, says Carl June, who specializes in immunotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and led one of the earlier studies.

"I think this is going to trigger ‘Sputnik 2.0’, a biomedical duel on progress between China and the United States, which is important since competition usually improves the end product,” he says.

June is the scientific adviser for a planned US trial that will use CRISPR to target three genes in participants’ cells, with the goal of treating various cancers. He expects the trial to start in early 2017. And in March 2017, a group at Peking University in Beijing hopes to start three clinical trials using CRISPR against bladder, prostate and renal-cell cancers. Those trials do not yet have approval or funding.
Protein target

Lu’s trial received ethical approval from a hospital review board in July. Injections into participants were supposed to begin in August but the date was pushed back, Lu says, because culturing and amplifying the cells took longer than expected and then the team ran into China’s October holidays.

The researchers removed immune cells from the recipient’s blood and then disabled a gene in them using CRISPR–Cas9, which combines a DNA-cutting enzyme with a molecular guide that can be programmed to tell the enzyme precisely where to cut. The disabled gene codes for the protein PD-1, which normally puts the brakes on a cell’s immune response: cancers take advantage of that function to proliferate.

Lu’s team then cultured the edited cells, increasing their number, and injected them back into the patient, who has metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer. The hope is that, without PD-1, the edited cells will attack and defeat the cancer.
Safety first

Lu says that the treatment went smoothly, and that the participant will get a second injection, but declined to give details because of patient confidentiality. The team plans to treat a total of ten people, who will each receive either two, three or four injections. It is primarily a safety trial, and participants will be monitored for six months to determine whether the injections are causing serious adverse effects. Lu’s team will also watch them beyond that time to see if they seem to be benefiting from the treatment.

Other oncologists are excited about CRISPR’s entry onto the cancer scene. “The technology to be able to do this is incredible,” says Naiyer Rizvi of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Antonio Russo of Palermo University in Italy notes that antibodies that neutralize PD-1 have successfully put lung cancer in check, boding well for a CRISPR-enabled attack on the protein. “It’s an exciting strategy,” he says. “The rationale is strong.”

But Rizvi questions whether this particular trial will succeed. The process of extracting, genetically modifying and multiplying cells is “a huge undertaking and not very scalable”, he says. “Unless it shows a large gain in efficacy, it will be hard to justify moving forward.” He doubts it will be superior to the use of antibodies, which can be expanded to unlimited quantities in the clinic. Lu says that this question is being evaluated in the trial, but that it’s too early to say which approach is better.

Nature
doi:10.1038/nature.2016.20988

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:28 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:52 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
DNA clues to why woolly mammoth died out

By Helen Briggs BBC News


The last woolly mammoths to walk the Earth were so wracked with genetic disease that they lost their sense of smell, shunned company, and had a strange shiny coat.

Image
Breakthroughs in ancient DNA sequencing give a window into the past

That's the verdict of scientists who have analysed ancient DNA of the extinct animals for mutations.

The studies suggest the last mammoths died out after their DNA became riddled with errors.

The knowledge could inform conservation efforts for living animals.

There are fewer than 100 Asiatic cheetahs left in the wild, while the remaining mountain gorilla population is estimated at about 300. The numbers are similar to those of the last woolly mammoths living on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean around 4,000 years ago.

Image

More

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 4:19 am
Posts: 12690
Location: the siege perilous
matty told hatty about a thing she saw...

_________________
el mapian poetry sucks


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 6:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 8:33 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 2:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
This one goes to GG:

The Strange Sheep that Baffled Scientists

A rare mutant sheep with straight, silky wool is helping unravel the mysteries of human hair.


When a farmer in Otago, New Zealand, saw a bizarre-looking lamb in his flock, he first assumed a wild goat had snuck in and impregnated one of his ewes. The newborn had a lamb-shaped body yet was coated with straight, lustrous wool, more like the hair of an angora goat than a typical sheep. News of the “geep” (or sheep-goat hybrid) soon reached the local papers but, when scientists saw photos, they immediately suspected the baby animal was something else. For decades they had been hoping to study a rare woolly mutant called a “Felting Lustre” mutant: a sheep which has straight, fine wool instead of the usual crimped stuff. MORE

Image

Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 5:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 23324
Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
This one goes to GG:

The Strange Sheep that Baffled Scientists

A rare mutant sheep with straight, silky wool is helping unravel the mysteries of human hair.


When a farmer in Otago, New Zealand, saw a bizarre-looking lamb in his flock, he first assumed a wild goat had snuck in and impregnated one of his ewes. The newborn had a lamb-shaped body yet was coated with straight, lustrous wool, more like the hair of an angora goat than a typical sheep. News of the “geep” (or sheep-goat hybrid) soon reached the local papers but, when scientists saw photos, they immediately suspected the baby animal was something else. For decades they had been hoping to study a rare woolly mutant called a “Felting Lustre” mutant: a sheep which has straight, fine wool instead of the usual crimped stuff. MORE

Image

Image


Cheers Mr. G_G, very interesting, since childhood I've stayed on friends and relatives farms and can remember having seen, what they called freak sheep, as far back as the 1960's.
They were usually killed for dog food, one of my cousins had one named Baaarry as family pet for about ten years, Baaarry thought he was a dog, luckily for Baaarry the dogs thought he was a dog too.....

_________________
hey punk, where you going with that presidential pardon in your pocket? I, I don't recall.....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 7:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 5:48 pm
Posts: 29948
Location: Somewhere in time
Gray_Ghost on a farm in the 60's with Freaky sheep...there's a joke in there somewhere... :mrgreen:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2017 1:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 4:19 am
Posts: 12690
Location: the siege perilous
Image

_________________
el mapian poetry sucks


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2017 5:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 23324
Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Image

Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

_________________
hey punk, where you going with that presidential pardon in your pocket? I, I don't recall.....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Image

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 9:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
Not the son of Mr Green Genes...

DNA proves Dalí is NOT the father of Spanish psychic

A DNA test done on the remains of Salvador Dali show he is not the father of a Spanish psychic claiming to be his illegitimate daughter who asked for his exhumation, the Dali Foundation said Wednesday.


Image

Genetic matter taken from the exhumed remains of the surrealist artist Salvador Dalí prove that he was not the father of a woman who claimed to be his secret love child.

"The DNA tests show that Pilar Abel is not Dali's daughter," the foundation said in a statement.

The DNA samples were taken from the artists "skin, nail and two long bones" after Dalí was exhumed from the tomb at the museum in his Spanish hometown of Figueres in July, when it was revealed that his moustache had remained intact and in the ten-past-ten position.

A huge fortune

Pilar Abel, a 61-year-old who long worked as a psychic in Catalonia, claimed her mother had a relationship with the artist when she worked in Cadaques, a picturesque Spanish port where the painter lived for years.

A Madrid judge last month granted her a DNA test to find out whether her allegations are true.

If Abel had been confirmed as Dalí's only child, she could have been entitled to 25 percent of the huge fortune and heritage of one of the most celebrated and prolific painters of the 20th century, the woman's lawyer Enrique Blanquez said.

Dalí's estate, which includes properties and hundreds of paintings, is entirely in the hands of the Spanish state.

The Salvador Dalí Foundation which manages the estate says it was worth nearly €400 million ($460 million) at the end of 2016.

In an interview in June, just days after a court ordered the exhumation, Abel said her grandmother had told her she was Dalí's daughter when she was seven or eight years old. Her mother admitted it much later.

Abel is from the city of Figueras, like Dalí, and she said she would often see him in the streets.

"We wouldn't say anything, we would just look at each other. But a glance is worth a thousand words," she said.

'Known in the village'

A question has always hung over his sexuality, with some claiming he was a closet homosexual who preferred to watch others having sex rather than taking part.

But according to Abel's lawyer Blanquez, his affair was "known in the village, there are people who have testified before a notary".

Born on May 11, 1904 in Figueras to a bourgeois family, Dalí developed an interest in painting from an early age.

In 1922 he began studying at the Fine Arts Academy in Madrid where he developed his first avant-garde artistic ideas in association with poet Federico Garcia Lorca and the filmmaker Luis Buñuel.

Soon he left for Paris to join the surrealist movement, giving the school his own personal twist and rocketing to fame with works such as "The Great Masturbator."

Returning to Catalonia after 12 years, he invited French poet Paul Eluard and his Russian wife Elena Ivanovna Diakonova to Cadaques.

She became his muse -- he gave her the pet name Gala -- and remained at his side for the rest of her life.

They never had children and she died in 1982, seven years before Dalí's death.

https://www.thelocal.es/20170906/dna-proves-dal-is-not-father-of-spanish-psychic

MGG explains the principles of DNA paternity tests:

They are based in Mendel's 1st Law, which states that our genes are composed of pairs of factors, each factor randomly inherited from each progenitor (who, in turn, have also two factors, but have to roll the dice on which of the pair members they will eventually transmit to you).

So say, mother has a genetic profile KL and the son LM. Then for a paternity inclusion the alleged father has to have a profile MX, where X is anything. You do this for several genes until you're [statistically] sure. Exclusions are easy. But in the case of inclusion (putative father is compatible with son), you have to ask yourself, what are the odds of someone not your kin having, by chance, a similar/compatible genetic profile. After examining around six or seven genes these odds drop to around a one in dozens of millions. When you don't have the living alleged father, you need close family members to reconstruct the father's possible profile, which seemed not to be the case for Dali.

Genetics, it's hip!

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:51 pm
Posts: 23324
Location: >>==> Wellington New Zealand
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
Not the son of Mr Green Genes...

DNA proves Dalí is NOT the father of Spanish psychic

A DNA test done on the remains of Salvador Dali show he is not the father of a Spanish psychic claiming to be his illegitimate daughter who asked for his exhumation, the Dali Foundation said Wednesday.


Image

Genetic matter taken from the exhumed remains of the surrealist artist Salvador Dalí prove that he was not the father of a woman who claimed to be his secret love child.

"The DNA tests show that Pilar Abel is not Dali's daughter," the foundation said in a statement.

The DNA samples were taken from the artists "skin, nail and two long bones" after Dalí was exhumed from the tomb at the museum in his Spanish hometown of Figueres in July, when it was revealed that his moustache had remained intact and in the ten-past-ten position.

A huge fortune

Pilar Abel, a 61-year-old who long worked as a psychic in Catalonia, claimed her mother had a relationship with the artist when she worked in Cadaques, a picturesque Spanish port where the painter lived for years.

A Madrid judge last month granted her a DNA test to find out whether her allegations are true.

If Abel had been confirmed as Dalí's only child, she could have been entitled to 25 percent of the huge fortune and heritage of one of the most celebrated and prolific painters of the 20th century, the woman's lawyer Enrique Blanquez said.

Dalí's estate, which includes properties and hundreds of paintings, is entirely in the hands of the Spanish state.

The Salvador Dalí Foundation which manages the estate says it was worth nearly €400 million ($460 million) at the end of 2016.

In an interview in June, just days after a court ordered the exhumation, Abel said her grandmother had told her she was Dalí's daughter when she was seven or eight years old. Her mother admitted it much later.

Abel is from the city of Figueras, like Dalí, and she said she would often see him in the streets.

"We wouldn't say anything, we would just look at each other. But a glance is worth a thousand words," she said.

'Known in the village'

A question has always hung over his sexuality, with some claiming he was a closet homosexual who preferred to watch others having sex rather than taking part.

But according to Abel's lawyer Blanquez, his affair was "known in the village, there are people who have testified before a notary".

Born on May 11, 1904 in Figueras to a bourgeois family, Dalí developed an interest in painting from an early age.

In 1922 he began studying at the Fine Arts Academy in Madrid where he developed his first avant-garde artistic ideas in association with poet Federico Garcia Lorca and the filmmaker Luis Buñuel.

Soon he left for Paris to join the surrealist movement, giving the school his own personal twist and rocketing to fame with works such as "The Great Masturbator."

Returning to Catalonia after 12 years, he invited French poet Paul Eluard and his Russian wife Elena Ivanovna Diakonova to Cadaques.

She became his muse -- he gave her the pet name Gala -- and remained at his side for the rest of her life.

They never had children and she died in 1982, seven years before Dalí's death.

https://www.thelocal.es/20170906/dna-proves-dal-is-not-father-of-spanish-psychic

MGG explains the principles of DNA paternity tests:

They are based in Mendel's 1st Law, which states that our genes are composed of pairs of factors, each factor randomly inherited from each progenitor (who, in turn, have also two factors, but have to roll the dice on which of the pair members they will eventually transmit to you).

So say, mother has a genetic profile KL and the son LM. Then for a paternity inclusion the alleged father has to have a profile MX, where X is anything. You do this for several genes until you're [statistically] sure. Exclusions are easy. But in the case of inclusion (putative father is compatible with son), you have to ask yourself, what are the odds of someone not your kin having, by chance, a similar/compatible genetic profile. After examining around six or seven genes these odds drop to around a one in dozens of millions. When you don't have the living alleged father, you need close family members to reconstruct the father's possible profile, which seemed not to be the case for Dali.

Genetics, it's hip!


I hope the money grabbing fantasist has to pay for the desecration of Mr. Dali's grave.....

_________________
hey punk, where you going with that presidential pardon in your pocket? I, I don't recall.....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2003 2:41 pm
Posts: 16340
slime.oofytv.set wrote:
Image


the vapor shark dna 200 is a power regulated digital switch-mode dc-dc
converter for personal vaporizers; the dna 200 runs from a 3 cell lithium
polymer battery, and features cell-by-cell battery monitoring and integrated
balance charger

the usb port and software can be used to customize or monitor the user
experience; the most advanced personal vaporizer controller ever made; the
vapor shark dna 200 is vaping down to a science

features
• patented wattage control
• temperature protection
• preheat
• digital user controls
• oled screen
• onboard buttons
• synchronous rectification for maximum battery life
• minimal heat generation
• stealth mode
• power locked mode
• resistance lock
• 8 profiles
• cell balancer
• onboard 25 amp smt fuse


specifications
output power: 1 watt - 200 watts
output voltage: 0.5 volts - 9.0 volts
output current: 50.0 amps, continuous
output current: 55.0 amps, instantaneous peak
temp sensing wire: 0.10 ohm cold
kanthal wire: 0.20 ohm
temp limit: 200°f - 600°f
input voltage: 9.0 volts - 11.1 volts
input current: 0.5 amps - 23.0 amps
screen power: 18 milliamps
power down: 25 µamps
efficiency: 97%
board weight: 15 g
footprint: 0.71" x 2.80"
thickness: 0.32"
screen size: 0.91" oled



Image


One price I saw was 190.00. Lots of money just to blow flavored smoke out of your mouth.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 12:41 pm
Posts: 16525
Location: Behind a ultra-avant laminated, simulated replica-mahogany desk
If you are using it to substitute raw smoke, your good health is worth it. It is priceless, you know... Although I was kind of surprised to learn that tobacco or even nicotine itself is carcinogen. I used to think only the byproducts of combustion alone were the carcinogen part of the smoke.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 79 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group