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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 3:28 am 
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When I first saw the original Do you ever dream about Frank?, back in the day, I thought it was kind of silly, because untill then, I haven't ever dreamed about FZ... But somewhere in the middle of the way, that happened in fact! I don't really remember what, just talking with him or something...

Last night just before wakening, I've dreamed I was meeting and talking to legendary drummer Tonny Williams (at his middle 70's re-incarnation). That was almost certainly triggered by Tinseltown Banana's post at What Are you Listening to... thread, which I've checked moments before going to bed...

Dreams can be quite personal or can be simply totally random... Sometimes they can be mysterious too...

If you feel like commenting on something you have dreamed last night or in the past, please tell us your story.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:30 am 
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For the past few weeks, I've been having this recurring dream about pencils transforming into sausages. What could it mean?

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:37 am 
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BBP wrote:
For the past few weeks, I've been having this recurring dream about pencils transforming into sausages. What could it mean?


you gotta stop chewing the erasers! :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:50 am 
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I always have weird dreams, lordy knows why.
I had a dream the other night, that I was at my friends Mum's Funeral. In this dream, it made perfect logical sense, that the person who was about to "die" (technically in this world should have been dead already, on the day of her funeral) chose their own clothes, and chatted to the family before their untimely demise. All her family were there in this dream, all dressed in black and mourning her like she had already gone. The rules in this world (ie, my dream), meant that all humans got to a certain age and then were issued with notification that they would be leaving the Earth. They met the end, by climbing into a type of washing machine herself, all dressed in her finery (one was installed in everyones house) and the machine just span her round and ground her down until she was just rubble. Then we placed her "remains" in the coffin and had a Funeral service for her.
If that aint weird, I don't know what is. :shock:

I also had a dream that my ex was a tramp, and walked the streets desperate and drinking too much. Maybe that was just wishful thinking on my part though hahaha (just kidding). :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:03 am 
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Yeah, Apsy, you have pointed out one of the very interesting aspects of dreams: they have their own universe with their own laws, and everything makes sense in that world, no matter how bizarre they are. Nicely put...

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:05 am 
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aspy_2nd_bunch wrote:
I always have weird dreams, lordy knows why.


well, ever had a normal dream ?!? most dreams are fucked up! :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:46 am 
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timm0 wrote:
aspy_2nd_bunch wrote:
I always have weird dreams, lordy knows why.


well, ever had a normal dream ?!? most dreams are fucked up! :wink:


Oh yeah! I can't count the number of times I dreamed I was late for school!

And once I dreamed I was at the bus station in Eindhoven and found a Euro there. The very day after, when I was at said bus station, I found a euro! Not on exactly the same spot, but not too far away!
(cue X-files theme)

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 9:25 am 
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Last night I dreamed I saw the bombers,
Up there flying shotgun in the sky,
Turning into butterflies above a hopeful nation.
[Joni Mitchell's dream, not mine!]

BBP wrote:
Oh yeah! I can't count the number of times I dreamed I was late for school!


I too have the "late for school" dream . . . CONSTANTLY. But because I was a schoolteacher for 8 years, I am the teacher in the dream showing up late to a hallway full of kids who can't get into my classroom cuz the door is locked. I was never TRULY late when I was a teacher, but I was always terrified of it cuz I'm just a late bastard--I'll be 10 minutes late for my own funeral! But there were mornings when I'd get there about 1 minute before class began and the kids would be in the hall waiting.

I haven't taught in nine years, but I still have the dream and I'm still a late bastard.

Joni Mitchell's dream is much better.

vcf

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:11 am 
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i still have dreams wherein i find that i have rejoined the military again even though it's been 30 years since i served actively. i get so angry at myself in the dream for doing so that i wake myself up. i have also died a few times in my dreams which according to legend cause you to die for real. i do notice that the older i have gotten the more realistic my dreams have become.

has anybody ever heard of taking control of your actions in dreams? i read of this in Castenada's books many years ago and was able to do it to a degree after much practice. very weird. you begin by forcing yourself to look at your hands in the dream. once you can do that you can begin to look around, but the key is not to look at anything for too long or it will change. it takes quite an effort, but it can actually be done.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:19 am 
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For over a year I had different variations of one particular dream: I was somehow high above the earth watching this incredibly huge, violent storm slowly move across the planet. It looked a lot like that "spot" on Jupiter which is a storm and I felt terrified beyond words seeing it move towards me and where I was on earth.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:39 am 
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jimmyzen wrote:
has anybody ever heard of taking control of your actions in dreams?


when I was probably around 10-12 years old, I had the experience of learning I was dreaming twice. One time, I would start to take advantage of it and fly; the movement sensation was more like swimming underwater than to superman... Now, everytime I become aware I am dreaming, I wake up automatically :cry:

______________________________________________________________

The Biology of Dreams

Heidi Adler-Michaelson

"Just as dreams are unreal in
comparison with the things seen in waking life, even
so the things seen in waking life in this world are unreal in
comparison with the thought-world, which alone in truly real
."- Hermes


Since the beginning of their existence, heterotrophic organisms have been defined by the need for sleep. Humans accept it (more or less willingly) when they are infants and embrace every opportunity for it as college students and adults. It does not take a lot of psychological or biological background to tell that it is critical to human life. Our bodies simply stop functioning after a long period of time without it and the more we get the better we feel. But what if sleep is not only necessary for the body but the mind as well?
This is the origin of the dream. If one studies the fundamentals of biology she is sure to learn that nothing exists if it is unnecessary for survival because it would have regressed over the course of billions of years. What then is the importance of sleep to the human mind? One might think that sleep is the same as being unconscious but people take sleeping pills to knock themselves out and wonder why they still feel horrible or even worse the next morning. In fact, sleep is full of mental activity. During sleep muscles tense; blood pressure, pulse, and temperature rise; and various senses are alert (4). Random thoughts occur throughout the night, sometimes even taking on some scheme. This phenomenon is called a dream.
What is a dream? It would be pretentious of anyone to assume that modern psychology or biology have grasped all the complexities of dreams. Yet, especially in the past two centuries, many theories stand and observations have been made. There are at least three indicators that someone is dreaming.
The first indicator is called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. As the name indicates, the eyes of the sleeper move back and forth at rapid speed during her sleep. If one is to wake someone up indicating this rapid eye movement, the sleeper is sure to tell of the vivid dream(s) she just experienced (4).
The second indicator of dreaming has to do with the EEG (electroencephalogram) system. If one takes a closer look at a sleepers brain wave pattern in REM sleep, there are striking similarities to the pattern at an awake stage (7). It consists of desynchronized minimal waves in both cases (3).
The third indicator that someone is dreaming is if they are paralyzed. In fact, paralysis is thought to protect the dreamer from acting on their dreams. This paralysis is due to certain neurons in the frontal lobes of the brain. The activity of the brain during this stage of sleep begins in a structure called the pons which is located in the brain-stem. The pons send messages to shut off the neurons in the spinal cord which results in an almost full body paralysis (2).
The first REM session occurs c. 90 minutes after falling asleep and then in 90 minute intervals after that. Depending on how long one sleeps, she can have between four and six REM sessions each night. (2).The first session is very short no longer than five minutes. Each succeeding REM session get longer and the average person's longest dream can be up to thirty minutes long. (1).
Psychology has made some early advancements in the subject of dreams dating back to the Austrian neurologist who developed Psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud. His theories have oftentimes been taught as the truth which is always a problem. His successors today believe that dreams serve as mental relief and problem solving. In the past decades, however, biologists have made considerable advances in the field of dreams. They state that the most important function of dream sleep is the growth of the brain. This is a result of the observation that infants dreams four times as much as adults. Neurobiologists have discovered that "neurons (brain cells) sprout new axons and dendrites (nerve fibers) during dream sleep. This brain growth gives us a stronger network of brain circuits which allow us to have greater intellect...Although many brain chemicals are involved in sleep and dreaming, two very important ones are the neurotransmitter serotonin and a brain hormone called melatonin. Both are produced by the pineal gland of the brain" (1). Melatonin is meant to calm the brain and induce sleep. Serotonin on the other hand triggers the brain to dream.
Since I wrote about the effect of alcohol on the fetus in my last paper, I thought it might be interesting to consider the effect it has on sleep and dreams. The neurotransmitter, as I hope I've made quite clear, is crucial to the dreaming process. Alcohol causes the level of Serotonin in the brain to drop considerably which results in what appears to be dreamless sleep. This is sleep without REM activity. On the other hand, when alcoholics try to withdraw, many experience delirium tremens (DTs) (2). These nights are characterized by shaking, sweating and hallucinations. Many biologists believe that the mind takes the opportunity of the absence of alcohol and overproduces serotonin which results in the hallucinations.
It is important to understand that not sleeping can be harmful on at least two levels and can lead to hallucinations while one in awake. Generally one's body will compensate for lack of dream sleep one night by dreaming more the following night until the normal quota is reached. Unless you are an alcoholic who does not sleep in which case you will quite literally "loose your mind" (2).
As with any field of science, there is a fair amount of controversy surrounding dreams, some of which has been presented already. Furthermore, as with any field of scientific research, it is safe to assume that the controversy will never end. There are many theories but one in particular I would like to concentrate on. David Maurice, Ph.D. is a professor of ocular physiology in the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia-Presbyterian Medial Center. He is one of the many that questions the wide-spread belief that REM sleep exists mainly to process memories of the previous day. Maurice hypothesizes that "while sleep humans experience REM to supply much-needed oxygen to the cornea of the eye...[He] suggests that the aqueous humor—the clear watery liquid in the anterior chamber just behind the cornea—needs to be 'stirred' to bring oxygen to the cornea." In addition he states that "[w]ithout REM our corneas would starve and suffocate while we are asleep with our eyes closed" (5).
The reason for Maurice's engagement in this field of study began some years back when he started observing animals. He says: "I wondered why animals born with sealed eyelids needed REM or why fetuses in the womb experience a great amount of REM" (5).
David Maurice then developed his hypothesis after learning about a young man who had an accident and whose eyes had been immobilized as a result. His corneas had become laced with blood vessels to supply the corneas with oxygen. We know that when eyes are shut, oxygen can reach the cornea from the iris solely by way of the stagnant aqueous humor. Maurice did the calculations and found that the oxygen supplied under these conditions would be insufficient. This ultimately formed his hypothesis that REM must bring oxygen to the brain somehow.
As I indicated in the beginning, the functions of dreams are still unclear and heavily under debate. Dreaming may play a role in the restoration of the brain's ability to cope with tasks such as focused attention, memory, and learning. Dreaming may "just" be a window to hidden feelings. Almost everything is possible and we may never know. We do know that "You have, within yourself, an ability to make yourself experiences no one else has ever had. And hence to see things no one has ever seen and learn things no one has ever learned" (6). Maybe it is as important to individualize dreams as it is to analyze the general population's dreams. We might just by able to learn about ourselves and in the process, learn about others as well which the beauty of science is, after all. Whether the thought is soothing or uncomfortable, as you continue to sleep and dream you must know that the controversy of the biology of dreams is one that won't ever go to sleep.

References

1)Geocities Biology Page, a rich resource from Geocities
2)21st Century Biology, a rich resource from by Lauren Brownlee
3)General Psychology I- Introductory Psychology, a rich resource from the University of Connecticut
4)Ask A Scientist, a rich resource from United States Department of Energy
5)Columbia University Biology Page, a rich resource from Maury M. Breecher
6)Serendip page, a rich resource from Bryn Mawr College
7)Sleep Stages from upenn, a rich resource from the University of Pennsylvania

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 11:29 am 
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Superb post Mr_green_genes. Very interested in dreams myself.

Had one the other night where I was onstage in a big band set up (just as Frank would) except I was trying out for John Zorn! For some reason he put me on a shitty drumkit in front of the drummer. I was pissed off a little, as I am (trying to become) a bassist. I played along where I was supposed to, fucked up a few bits, song ended. Thought I done ok but I still felt that even though I had got to give it a shot, I still had no answer as to whether or not I was "good enough". I have been wondering a lot lately about whether there's any point in my literally daydreaming of becoming a bassist for a Zappa or a Zorn or whoever but there was definitely some meaning behind it.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 12:42 pm 
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forgot my name

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 12:47 pm 
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aspy_2nd_bunch wrote:
I always have weird dreams, lordy knows why.
I had a dream the other night, that I was at my friends Mum's Funeral. In this dream, it made perfect logical sense, that the person who was about to "die" (technically in this world should have been dead already, on the day of her funeral) chose their own clothes, and chatted to the family before their untimely demise. All her family were there in this dream, all dressed in black and mourning her like she had already gone. The rules in this world (ie, my dream), meant that all humans got to a certain age and then were issued with notification that they would be leaving the Earth. They met the end, by climbing into a type of washing machine herself, all dressed in her finery (one was installed in everyones house) and the machine just span her round and ground her down until she was just rubble. Then we placed her "remains" in the coffin and had a Funeral service for her.
If that aint weird, I don't know what is. :shock:

I also had a dream that my ex was a tramp, and walked the streets desperate and drinking too much. Maybe that was just wishful thinking on my part though hahaha (just kidding). :wink:

sounds like the giver

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 1:16 pm 
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jimmyzen wrote:
has anybody ever heard of taking control of your actions in dreams?


a lucid dream, yes.. i have done this a few times, it's fun. 8)

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 1:38 pm 
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IwantTokillYourmomma wrote:
aspy_2nd_bunch wrote:
I always have weird dreams, lordy knows why.
I had a dream the other night, that I was at my friends Mum's Funeral. In this dream, it made perfect logical sense, that the person who was about to "die" (technically in this world should have been dead already, on the day of her funeral) chose their own clothes, and chatted to the family before their untimely demise. All her family were there in this dream, all dressed in black and mourning her like she had already gone. The rules in this world (ie, my dream), meant that all humans got to a certain age and then were issued with notification that they would be leaving the Earth. They met the end, by climbing into a type of washing machine herself, all dressed in her finery (one was installed in everyones house) and the machine just span her round and ground her down until she was just rubble. Then we placed her "remains" in the coffin and had a Funeral service for her.
If that aint weird, I don't know what is. :shock:

I also had a dream that my ex was a tramp, and walked the streets desperate and drinking too much. Maybe that was just wishful thinking on my part though hahaha (just kidding). :wink:

sounds like the giver


Huh?

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 1:41 pm 
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its a popular junior high book about a utopian society

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:00 pm 
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Yeah..that book is one that transcends it's age market. Sort of like the Little Prince, which I always find in "children's" sections of the bookstore.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:04 pm 
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IwantTokillYourmomma wrote:
its a popular junior high book about a utopian society


Ahh right, I've never heard of it you see. Sorry. :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:56 pm 
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ahh...wasnt too good anyhow..

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 3:49 pm 
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I won't disagree with you, because compared to other novels it's very lacklustre, but it sure opened a lot of kids minds in middle school. Others were just 'What the fuck..?'


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:09 pm 
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Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
jimmyzen wrote:
has anybody ever heard of taking control of your actions in dreams?


when I was probably around 10-12 years old, I had the experience of learning I was dreaming twice. One time, I would start to take advantage of it and fly; the movement sensation was more like swimming underwater than to superman... Now, everytime I become aware I am dreaming, I wake up automatically :cry:
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
when I was probably around 10-12 years old, I had the experience of learning I was dreaming twice. One time, I would start to take advantage of it and fly; the movement sensation was more like swimming underwater than to superman... Now, everytime I become aware I am dreaming, I wake up automatically :cry:
I was a little older when my flying dreams occurred and although it was as you described - more like swimming underwater - I never went higher than the rooftops of the buildings and telephone wires and if I felt or myself losing height I'd have to kick my legs to regain my distance from the ground. Of course everywhere I flew was a familiar area to me and I never wanted to lose height. It even seemed that once I lost too much distance from the ground the flying dream was regrettably over. :cry: This was the only enjoyable dreaming I ever experienced at all -- the rest of my "dream life" was hell and horror and involved the worst elements my mind could possibly come up with. Especially common was the very frequent phenomenon of my dreams beginning as if I were watching TV or seeing a movie which would suddenly become real and were no longer TV shows or movies. I wonder how many other people have experienced dreams that began like that?

--Bat :smoke:
______________________________________________________________

The Biology of Dreams

Heidi Adler-Michaelson

"Just as dreams are unreal in
comparison with the things seen in waking life, even
so the things seen in waking life in this world are unreal in
comparison with the thought-world, which alone in truly real
."- Hermes


Since the beginning of their existence, heterotrophic organisms have been defined by the need for sleep. Humans accept it (more or less willingly) when they are infants and embrace every opportunity for it as college students and adults. It does not take a lot of psychological or biological background to tell that it is critical to human life. Our bodies simply stop functioning after a long period of time without it and the more we get the better we feel. But what if sleep is not only necessary for the body but the mind as well?
This is the origin of the dream. If one studies the fundamentals of biology she is sure to learn that nothing exists if it is unnecessary for survival because it would have regressed over the course of billions of years. What then is the importance of sleep to the human mind? One might think that sleep is the same as being unconscious but people take sleeping pills to knock themselves out and wonder why they still feel horrible or even worse the next morning. In fact, sleep is full of mental activity. During sleep muscles tense; blood pressure, pulse, and temperature rise; and various senses are alert (4). Random thoughts occur throughout the night, sometimes even taking on some scheme. This phenomenon is called a dream.
What is a dream? It would be pretentious of anyone to assume that modern psychology or biology have grasped all the complexities of dreams. Yet, especially in the past two centuries, many theories stand and observations have been made. There are at least three indicators that someone is dreaming.
The first indicator is called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. As the name indicates, the eyes of the sleeper move back and forth at rapid speed during her sleep. If one is to wake someone up indicating this rapid eye movement, the sleeper is sure to tell of the vivid dream(s) she just experienced (4).
The second indicator of dreaming has to do with the EEG (electroencephalogram) system. If one takes a closer look at a sleepers brain wave pattern in REM sleep, there are striking similarities to the pattern at an awake stage (7). It consists of desynchronized minimal waves in both cases (3).
The third indicator that someone is dreaming is if they are paralyzed. In fact, paralysis is thought to protect the dreamer from acting on their dreams. This paralysis is due to certain neurons in the frontal lobes of the brain. The activity of the brain during this stage of sleep begins in a structure called the pons which is located in the brain-stem. The pons send messages to shut off the neurons in the spinal cord which results in an almost full body paralysis (2).
The first REM session occurs c. 90 minutes after falling asleep and then in 90 minute intervals after that. Depending on how long one sleeps, she can have between four and six REM sessions each night. (2).The first session is very short no longer than five minutes. Each succeeding REM session get longer and the average person's longest dream can be up to thirty minutes long. (1).
Psychology has made some early advancements in the subject of dreams dating back to the Austrian neurologist who developed Psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud. His theories have oftentimes been taught as the truth which is always a problem. His successors today believe that dreams serve as mental relief and problem solving. In the past decades, however, biologists have made considerable advances in the field of dreams. They state that the most important function of dream sleep is the growth of the brain. This is a result of the observation that infants dreams four times as much as adults. Neurobiologists have discovered that "neurons (brain cells) sprout new axons and dendrites (nerve fibers) during dream sleep. This brain growth gives us a stronger network of brain circuits which allow us to have greater intellect...Although many brain chemicals are involved in sleep and dreaming, two very important ones are the neurotransmitter serotonin and a brain hormone called melatonin. Both are produced by the pineal gland of the brain" (1). Melatonin is meant to calm the brain and induce sleep. Serotonin on the other hand triggers the brain to dream.
Since I wrote about the effect of alcohol on the fetus in my last paper, I thought it might be interesting to consider the effect it has on sleep and dreams. The neurotransmitter, as I hope I've made quite clear, is crucial to the dreaming process. Alcohol causes the level of Serotonin in the brain to drop considerably which results in what appears to be dreamless sleep. This is sleep without REM activity. On the other hand, when alcoholics try to withdraw, many experience delirium tremens (DTs) (2). These nights are characterized by shaking, sweating and hallucinations. Many biologists believe that the mind takes the opportunity of the absence of alcohol and overproduces serotonin which results in the hallucinations.
It is important to understand that not sleeping can be harmful on at least two levels and can lead to hallucinations while one in awake. Generally one's body will compensate for lack of dream sleep one night by dreaming more the following night until the normal quota is reached. Unless you are an alcoholic who does not sleep in which case you will quite literally "loose your mind" (2).
As with any field of science, there is a fair amount of controversy surrounding dreams, some of which has been presented already. Furthermore, as with any field of scientific research, it is safe to assume that the controversy will never end. There are many theories but one in particular I would like to concentrate on. David Maurice, Ph.D. is a professor of ocular physiology in the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia-Presbyterian Medial Center. He is one of the many that questions the wide-spread belief that REM sleep exists mainly to process memories of the previous day. Maurice hypothesizes that "while sleep humans experience REM to supply much-needed oxygen to the cornea of the eye...[He] suggests that the aqueous humor—the clear watery liquid in the anterior chamber just behind the cornea—needs to be 'stirred' to bring oxygen to the cornea." In addition he states that "[w]ithout REM our corneas would starve and suffocate while we are asleep with our eyes closed" (5).
The reason for Maurice's engagement in this field of study began some years back when he started observing animals. He says: "I wondered why animals born with sealed eyelids needed REM or why fetuses in the womb experience a great amount of REM" (5).
David Maurice then developed his hypothesis after learning about a young man who had an accident and whose eyes had been immobilized as a result. His corneas had become laced with blood vessels to supply the corneas with oxygen. We know that when eyes are shut, oxygen can reach the cornea from the iris solely by way of the stagnant aqueous humor. Maurice did the calculations and found that the oxygen supplied under these conditions would be insufficient. This ultimately formed his hypothesis that REM must bring oxygen to the brain somehow.
As I indicated in the beginning, the functions of dreams are still unclear and heavily under debate. Dreaming may play a role in the restoration of the brain's ability to cope with tasks such as focused attention, memory, and learning. Dreaming may "just" be a window to hidden feelings. Almost everything is possible and we may never know. We do know that "You have, within yourself, an ability to make yourself experiences no one else has ever had. And hence to see things no one has ever seen and learn things no one has ever learned" (6). Maybe it is as important to individualize dreams as it is to analyze the general population's dreams. We might just by able to learn about ourselves and in the process, learn about others as well which the beauty of science is, after all. Whether the thought is soothing or uncomfortable, as you continue to sleep and dream you must know that the controversy of the biology of dreams is one that won't ever go to sleep.

References

1)Geocities Biology Page, a rich resource from Geocities
2)21st Century Biology, a rich resource from by Lauren Brownlee
3)General Psychology I- Introductory Psychology, a rich resource from the University of Connecticut
4)Ask A Scientist, a rich resource from United States Department of Energy
5)Columbia University Biology Page, a rich resource from Maury M. Breecher
6)Serendip page, a rich resource from Bryn Mawr College
7)Sleep Stages from upenn, a rich resource from the University of Pennsylvania

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:40 pm 
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Batchain1001 wrote:
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
jimmyzen wrote:
has anybody ever heard of taking control of your actions in dreams?


when I was probably around 10-12 years old, I had the experience of learning I was dreaming twice. One time, I would start to take advantage of it and fly; the movement sensation was more like swimming underwater than to superman... Now, everytime I become aware I am dreaming, I wake up automatically :cry:

I was a little older when my flying dreams occurred and although it was as you described - more like swimming underwater - I never went higher than the rooftops of the buildings and telephone wires and if I felt or myself losing height I'd have to kick my legs to regain my distance from the ground. Of course everywhere I flew was a familiar area to me and I never wanted to lose height. It even seemed that once I lost too much distance from the ground the flying dream was regrettably over. :cry: This was the only enjoyable dreaming I ever experienced at all -- the rest of my "dream life" was hell and horror and involved the worst elements my mind could possibly come up with. Especially common was the very frequent phenomenon of my dreams beginning as if I were watching TV or seeing a movie which would suddenly become real and were no longer TV shows or movies. I wonder how many other people have experienced dreams that began like that?

I believe this type of flying memory, which is almost like willing yourself to float above the ground is either memories from being in the womb or being carried as a newborn.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:45 pm 
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A rare phenomenon which I find particularly unnerving is waking from a dream to a bad situation which itself turns out to be a dream.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 6:18 pm 
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polydigm wrote:
A rare phenomenon which I find particularly unnerving is waking from a dream to a bad situation which itself turns out to be a dream.
Oh, yes! I've had more than one "dream within a dream" and believed I'd actually woken up from some hellish thing only to find myself in another horrifying dream.
One dream I had absolutely no recollection of even after just waking from it I had when I was 17 and I was hollering as loud as I could ever holler during the thing, "Ma! Ma! Wake me up! Ma! Please wake me up! Wake me up, Ma!!!"
My mom was downstairs a good distance from me and she all but flew up the stairs, opened my bedroom door and did what I was screaming for her to do! She remarked that I sounded like a raving lunatic and that the whole fucking neighborhood probably heard me. But she just couldn't believe that I had no idea what I was dreaming while I was screaming like that. I told her, "Nope! Not a thing!" She'd never heard of anything like it.

--Bat :roll:

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