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PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2016 8:13 pm 
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Maybe a choice between Shiek and Joe's Garage to add to the essential list. That was an important stretch there with a lot of great comedy material with great bands, really great production, and among the best selling albums of his career.


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PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2016 9:04 pm 
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Thinman wrote:
… and do yourself and everybody else a favour and study this: http://www.globalia.net/donlope/fz/ and this: http://www.lukpac.org/~handmade/patio/vinylvscds/index.html


That is the bible, and most answere about FZ material can be found there.

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PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2016 11:53 pm 
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thread title correction suggestion: NAME YOUR FAVORITE FRANK ZAPPA ALBUMS

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PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2016 11:15 pm 
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Those whole thread has given me a headache.


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PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 1:59 am 
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i agree.
and i am tired of this kind of thing.
it is offensive and insulting. maybe not in that order, but you get the... actually...
piss on it. i am deleting my account in 2 hours and 25 minutes.

last straw.

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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 5:35 am 
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wakawazoo wrote:
What I don't get is that you start talking about FZ albums for the uninitiated and then you put virtually every studio release in chronological order. Sounds more like you're reviewing Zappa albums.

However, for the uninitiated I'd reccomend:

Freak Out!
Overnite Sensation
Hot Rats
One Size Fits All


Absolutely, but then if the listener is more inclined to lean towards classical compositions and orchestral music that's in tune with Edgard Varese I'd probably add 'London Symphony Orchestra Vol 1 and 2' to that list or at least Lather as it's got a bit of everything.


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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 5:37 am 
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lapsed maps wrote:
thread title correction suggestion: NAME YOUR FAVORITE FRANK ZAPPA ALBUMS


NOPE. That's not what it's about. The thread is about putting together some albums for those who would consider obtaining a large collection featuring the bulk of Frank's music without going broke in the process. Perhaps I should shorten it to a smaller list as mentioned but to me, this is as small as I could possibly make it and I have to agree leaving out Roxy & Elsewhere was extremely difficult.


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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 5:38 am 
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lapsed maps wrote:
i agree.
and i am tired of this kind of thing.
it is offensive and insulting. maybe not in that order, but you get the... actually...
piss on it. i am deleting my account in 2 hours and 25 minutes.

last straw.



?????


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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 5:45 am 
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oh cool, we're friends.

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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 3:53 pm 
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vivalapsych wrote:
Those whole thread has given me a headache.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2016 12:58 am 
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Bob's favorite FZ album


http://www.fresnobee.com/entertainment/ ... 75330.html

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2016 11:07 pm 
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The last time I was asked for a recommendation I told him to get:
Hot Rats
Zoot Allures
Sleep Dirt

The person in question had heard something from ZA, so that was the starting point here.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2016 3:04 am 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaMF5UblQAI

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:21 am 
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A Beginner’s Guide to the Surreal Music of Frank Zappa
By: Wil Lewellyn

https://www.treblezine.com/beginners-guide-frank-zappa/

The discography of Frank Zappa is much like the parable of the blind men and the elephant. Depending on the album you start with, your first impression of what Zappa does will be wildly different. With a career spanning from the Mothers of Invention’s 1966’s psych-rock Freak Out! album to the orchestral Yellow Shark released a month before he died in 1993, delving into his massive catalog might seem daunting. But If you are looking to get into Zappa you have come to the right person. The first album I heard was Frank Zappa Vs the Mothers of Prevention during an acid trip in high school. It piqued my interest—I found a double cassette of Joe’s Garage when I came down, and now 25 years later I am writing this guide to getting into Frank that does not require an eight-hour hallucination. Little did I know, aside from smoking a couple joints in the 60s, Frank was not into drugs, which might come across as a a surprise, considering how crazy his music can get.

The important of Zappa can not be overstated. He influenced a long list of artists including Phish, the Dixie Dregs, Mr. Bungle, Primus, Merzbow, Psychic TV, John Zorn, George Clinton, Brian Eno, Weird Al, Alice Cooper, Devo, Kraftwerk and Jimi Hendrix. Even Paul McCartney claimed Sgt Pepper’s was The Beatles’ Freak Out!. The broad range of the musicians he inspired reflect the even greater range of sounds Zappa dabbled in. Though his dabbling was what others would consider mastering.

For this beginner’s guide, I am not digging into his posthumous albums, instead focusing a little more on his solo work than his time with the Mothers, though they were certainly important. Here we go…

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Hot Rats
(1969; Bizarre/Reprise)

This is Zappa’s second solo album without the Mothers of Invention, though Mothers keyboardist Ian Underwood does appear on it, and Jean Luc Ponty and Captain Beefheart also make appearances on this album. But Zappa composed, arranged and produced the entirety of it. He also gives an instrumental reinterpretation of “Mr. Green Genes” from the Mothers album Uncle Meat. As one of the first albums to use 16-track recording, Hot Rats features many layers to create an almost orchestral feel. This is what big band might sound like in the world of Dr. Seuss.

At times Hot Rats sounds like it’s wandering off into free jazz, and the album does in fact lean in more of a jazz direction than it does rock. There are few bursts of electric guitar even amidst some of the jamming. There are glimpses into how he can get down with funk groove, and the instrumentation flows smoothly despite the quirky time signatures. “Peaches En Regalia” is has become modern day jazz standard, and aside from “Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow” might be Zappa’s most well-known song. What’s most important about the album is how it samples his musical styles. It showcases his phenomenal guitar playing, while capturing some of the best tones of his career.

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Apostrophe
(1974; Discreet)

I never got why people considered this time period to be more centered on humor, because it’s always been an element of Zappa’s music from the beginning. Though admittedly there was more absurdity in the detailed narratives on this, Zappa’s most commercially successful album. The first three songs are based off of a dream Zappa had where he was an Eskimo, including opener “Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow.”

This albums features players I think of as Zappa All-Stars: George Duke, Ruth Underwood and Napoleon Murphy Brock, who have all contributed to some of his best work. Duke certainly help bring out more of the soulful funk elements that can be heard here. This aspect of their sound is what makes “Cosmik Debris” not only one of the best songs on this album, but of Zappa’s career. And while Zappa’s vocal style has always been more sarcastically spoken, on this album he actually showcases more of his singing ability.

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One Size Fits All
(1975; Discreet)

This is the final album that Zappa recorded with the Mothers of Invention. You might ask why I chose to include their last record and not the earlier, more psychedelic garage prog records released in the ’60s. The short answer is that this album is more refined, showcasing more of a jazz sound. Also the lines were blurred between what was the Mothers and what was Zappa’s solo band as at this point the same musicians were playing in both.

There is more rock n roll swagger to “Can’t Afford No Shoes,” and Zappa employs funky grooves on “San Ber’dino”. “Andy” has one of George Duke’s best vocal performances and falls more in line with progressive rock in terms of acrobatics without sacrificing songwriting. The almost gospel feel of “Sofa 2” takes a turn for the weird when Zappa adds his wacky vocal.

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Zoot Allures
(1976; Warner Bros.)

Originally this was going to be a double album, but Zappa edited down to a single LP. One of the reasons it stands out among his many albums is that it shows what Zappa’s unique songwriting can do with a heavy metal motif. His association with the genre goes back to when he signed Alice Cooper to his Straight Records Label for Easy Action. The metal influence can be felt in the fiery energy of his guitar solos. The most metallic song on the album isthe heavy thumb of “Ms Pinky” and perhaps to a lesser extent, the lyrics of “The Torture Never Stops.” Granted when we’re discussing metal here, this is in the mid-’70s, so the earliest incarnations. Musically “The Torture Never Stops” owes more to blues, though this certainly is one of Zappa’s darker songs.

This album feature one of the best Zappa drummers, Terry Bozio of Missing Persons. While Patrick O’Hearn and Eddie Jobson from his touring band are on the album cover they did not actually play on the album. Zappa, always the conductor of his bands, has them lay back more and give the guitars more room to breathe, thus creating an album that I might point someone toward if they were looking for some of his best yet most tasteful guitar heroics. Zappa had few peers when it came to his guitar playing, Jimi Hendrix and John McLaughlin coming the closest.

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Ship Arriving Too Late to Save a Drowning Witch
(1982; Barking Pumpkin)

This 1982 album find Zappa going down an oddball new wave road. One half of the album was recorded in the studio the other half was live. The bass line to the opener “No Not Now” is rubbery funk played by Arthur Barrow and provides a groove to offset the zany vocals. I am a big fan of his ’80s band and would argue the lineup of Steve Vai, Ike Willis, Chad Wackerman, Scott Thunes, Tommy Mars and Ray White is better or comparable to any other combination of players Zappa employed.

Zappa’s daughter Moon Unit co-wrote and provides the vocal to “Valley Girl,” where she mocks the stereotypical Los Angeles teen age girl. The vocals to “I Come From Nowhere” are bizarrely catchy (especially under the influence). The live side of the album sheds the bulk of the new wave influence and goes on more of a jazz tangent, with Zappa employing a more lounge-lizard vocal in his narrative. This along with the more jammy quality is a sharp contrast to the studio side of the album. An angular dissonance haunts the instrumental “Envelopes,” and “Teenage Prostitute” finds Zappa merging hard rock with opera.

Also Recommended: His first album with the Mothers of Invention, 1966′s Freak Out!, is recommended to get perspective on where it began, with more accessible songs as well as plenty of peculiar experiments. The double album Joe’s Garage tells an interesting story of a band and their exploits with robot sex, and has my two favorite Zappa songs on it, “Why Does it Hurt When I Pee” and “Outside Now.” Over-Nite Sensation is also pretty user friendly, with songs that might have hovered in the periphery of progressive rock fans.

Advanced Listening: His live series of double albums called You Can’t Do That on Stage highlights his stellar live shows with the fourth album covering his ’80s band being the standout. I also would say any guitar player with aspirations of playing progressive rock needs to listen to Shut Up and Play Yer Guitar as it finds Frank tackling the styles of guitarists like Santana, Clapton and Hendrix and showing he can hold his own.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:07 pm 
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The more I have listened to Tinseltown recently the more I have felt it's an underrated album and quite a good starting point for people.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:42 am 
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My first introduction to the wonderful world of FZ was through Joe's Garage, act 1.

My older brother had borrowed the album off someone and absolutely hated it. He then proceeded to let me listen to it to 'demonstrate' its undeniable horribleness...
Much to his surprise (and disgust?) his futile attempt made me a Zappafficionado. Within weeks I had bought Joe's Garage act 1, JG acts 2 and 3, You Are What You Is and Zappa In New York. I still have them on vinyl and CD as well (in several different incarnations...).


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 3:27 am 
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wakawazoo wrote:
What I don't get is that you start talking about FZ albums for the uninitiated and then you put virtually every studio release in chronological order. Sounds more like you're reviewing Zappa albums.

However, for the uninitiated I'd reccomend:

Freak Out!
Overnite Sensation
Hot Rats
One Size Fits All

Good list. I guess to kind of stretch out from the safe, I would add Perfect Stranger.


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